Group 4 Created with Sketch.

Philosophy Books

All Audio
Updated On: Jul 18, 2022
Total Stations: 166
Total Audio Titles: 2,334

Popular "Philosophy Books" Stations

Chandogya Upanishad Audiobook The word Upanishad (upa-ni-shad) consists of, "Upa" means "near;" "ni" means "down;" "shad" means "to sit." Thus, Upanishad is to sit down near the teacher to discuss, learn, practice, and experience. There are some 200 or more Upanishads. Some are lost and are only known about because of being referenced in other Upanishads. The Chandogya-upanishad belongs to the Sama-veda. It ranks among the oldest Upanishads, dating to the Brahmana period of Vedic Sanskrit (before the 8th century BC). It figures as number 9 in the Muktika canon of 108 Upanishads. It is part of the Chandogya Brahmana, which has ten Prapathakas (Parts). The first two Prapathakas of the Brahmana deal with sacrifices and other forms of worship. The other eight Prapathakas and their Khandas (Chapters) constitute the Chandogya Upanishad. The 11 principal Upanishads to which Sankara appeals in his great commentary on the Vedanta-Surtras are: Chandogya, Talavakara or Kena, Aitareya, Kaushitaki, Vajasaneyi or Isha, Katha, Mundaka, Taittirtiyaka or Taittiriya, Brihadaranyaka, Svetasvatara, and Prasna. They are also called the 11 classical Upanishads or the fundamental Upanishads of the Vedanta Philosophy. The Upanishadic literature is not a religious scripture and is free from dogma and doctrines. It is not a part of any religion but is a philosophy for all times and for all. German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, impressed by the Upanishads, called the texts "the production of the highest human wisdom". (Summary by Jothi)

Listen to Chandogya Upanishad. Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from Chandogya Upanishad. You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chandogya Upanishad on the fly.
God and my Neighbour Audiobook "I have been asked why I have opposed Christianity. I have several reasons, which shall appear in due course. At present I offer one.
I oppose Christianity because it is not true.
No honest man will ask for any other reason. But it may be asked why I say that Christianity is not true; and that is a very proper question, which I shall do my best to answer." Thus states the author in one of the first chapters of this book, and subsequently he lays down his apology, drawing his conclusions from numerous books published by believers and unbelievers alike, and, of course, from the bible itself. (Summary by Availle, with a quote from the book.)

Listen to God and my Neighbour. Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from God and my Neighbour. You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save God and my Neighbour on the fly.
Our Knowledge of the External World: As a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy Audiobook Bertrand Russell gave the Lowell Lectures in March and April of 1914; these lectures produced 'Our Knowledge of the External World'. Russell attempts to analyze the relationship of the crude data of our senses to the notions of physics such as space, time, and matter. Russell takes his analysis to illustrate the method of logical analysis used to such wonderful effect by thinkers in the late nineteenth-century to the notions of continuity, infinity, and the infinitesimal. These analyses effected a new epoch of clarity in the philosophy of mathematics; Russell hopes that a similar new age of clarity can be effected in the rest of philosophy through logical analysis; here, he undertakes the first stages of this analysis in the philosophy of physics. Summary by Landon D. C. Elkind.

Listen to Our Knowledge of the External World: As a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy. Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from Our Knowledge of the External World: As a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy. You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Our Knowledge of the External World: As a Field for Scientific Method in Philosophy on the fly.
On War (Volume 1) Audiobook A classic work on military strategy by a veteran of the Napoleonic Wars. The author's style is dialectical: he makes two strong but opposing statements and then draws them together to describe many facets of war. Free of technical jargon, and suitable for modern readers. This audiobook is based on a 1909 English translation.
In section 2, the reader Timothy Ferguson was assisted by Linda Ferguson.

Listen to On War (Volume 1). Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from On War (Volume 1). You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save On War (Volume 1) on the fly.
Anthropology Audiobook Immanuel Kant gave a series of lectures on anthropology 1772-1773, 1795-1796 at the University of Königsberg, which was founded in 1544. His lectures dealt with recognizing the internal and external in man, cognition, sensuousness, the five senses, as well as the soul and the mind. They were gathered together and published in 1798 and then published in English in The Journal of Speculative Philosophy in 1867, volumes 9-16. Therefore, several texts will be used for this book. I was able to find sections 1-37 and then section 43, and sections 47-57. It seems that sections 38-42, 44-46 are not available. This is book one of his longer works.
My favorite quotes

If someone has purposely caused a disaster, and it is questionable whether he is at all, or in what degree he is to be, blamed for it, and whether or not he was insane at the time of the commission of the deed, the court should not refer him to the medical facility – the court itself being incompetent to decide upon such a case – but to the philosophical faculty. On this ground the question whether the accused was in the possession of all the faculties of his understanding and judgment, is altogether of a psychological nature….
Helmont says, that, after having taken a certain dose of “napell” – a poisonous root, he felt as if he thought in his stomach. Many people have experimented with opium to such an extent that they finally felt their minds weaken when they neglected to use this stimulant of their brain.
(Summary by Craig Campbell)
Links to texts:
Sections 1-2
Sections 3-4
Sections 5-7
Section 8
Sections 9-10
Sections 11-13
Sections 14-15
Sections 16-19
Section 20
Sections 21-22
Sections 23-26

Listen to Anthropology. Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from Anthropology. You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Anthropology on the fly.
The Majesty of Calmness Audiobook Change your life by changing your thoughts. The Majesty of Calmness is your guide to attracting prosperity, manifesting opportunities, and managing stress—all while discovering the values most precious to you. (Summary by Andrea Fiore)

Listen to The Majesty of Calmness. Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from The Majesty of Calmness. You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save The Majesty of Calmness on the fly.
Representative Men Audiobook A series of biographical lectures originally published in 1850. Each chapter is a philosophical treatment of the life of an intellectual. The six representatives are Plato, Swedenborg, Shakespeare, Montaigne, Napolean and Goethe. (Introduction by S. Kovalchik)

Listen to Representative Men. Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from Representative Men. You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Representative Men on the fly.
Parva Naturalia Audiobook I - On Sensation and the Sensible
II - On Memory and Recollection
III - On Sleeping and Waking
IV - On Dreams
V - On Prophecy in Sleep
VI - On Longevity and Shortness of Life
VII - On Youth and Old Age, Life and Death
VIII - On Respiration ( Summary Adapted from Wikipedia )

Listen to Parva Naturalia. Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from Parva Naturalia. You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Parva Naturalia on the fly.
The Genealogy of Morals Audiobook In 1887, with the view of amplifying and completing certain new doctrines which he had merely sketched in Beyond Good and Evil (see especially Aphorism 260), Nietzsche published The Genealogy of Morals. This work is perhaps the least aphoristic, in form, of all Nietzsche's productions. For analytical power, more especially in those parts where Nietzsche examines the ascetic ideal, The Genealogy of Morals is unequalled by any other of his works; and, in the light which it throws upon the attitude of the ecclesiast to the man of resentment and misfortune, it is one of the most valuable contributions to sacerdotal psychology. (summary by the editor of the Samuel translation)

Listen to The Genealogy of Morals. Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from The Genealogy of Morals. You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save The Genealogy of Morals on the fly.
The Moral Equivalent of War Audiobook The Moral Equivalent of War, the last public utterance of William James, is significant as expressing the opinions of a practical psychologist on a question of growing popular interest. For the past fifteen years the movement for promoting international peace has been enlisting the support of organizations and individuals the world over. That this is a question on which much may be said for the opposition, James, though a pacificist, admits with his usual fair-mindedness, pointing out that militarism is the sole nourisher of certain human virtues that the world cannot let die, and that until the peace party devises some substitute, some moral equivalent, for the disciplinary value of war, their utopian goal is neither desirable nor possible. His own solution is advanced not as a practical measure, but merely as an illustration to show that the world is full of opportunities for the peaceful development and continuation of the martial qualities of human life.

This essay was written for general dissemination as a publication of the American Association for International Conciliation, February, 1910. As it not only presents a peace program but defines as well the most familiar arguments of the war party, no militarist article has been included, although it may be mentioned that a suggestive apology for war is to be found among De Quincey's Essays and also in Ruskin's Crown of Wild Olive. Additional documents on conciliation, approaching the question from innumerable points of view, are published by the Association mentioned above.
(Summary by Harrison Ross Steeves and Frank Humphrey Ristine, editors.)
Edited and with an introduction by Harrison Ross Steeves (1881-1981) and Frank Humphrey Ristine (1884-1958)

Listen to The Moral Equivalent of War. Vurbl's free classic audiobook experience allows you to easily snip and save your favorite quotes or moments from The Moral Equivalent of War. You can even make a playlist with all your favorite chapters, quotes or moments, so that you can revisit and easily share your audiobook experience with friends and family. How many times do you read a book and highlight a quote or wish you wrote it down? With Vurbl's snippet tool, you can snip and capture that quote in seconds and add it to your station. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save The Moral Equivalent of War on the fly.

Popular "Philosophy Books" Playlists

Free Streaming Audio: Top Philosophy Audiobooks Open your mind and listen in on some of the best Philosophy Audiobooks. From literary Fiction Classics like Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky to Nonfiction pieces from Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, dive into these audiobooks from some of the best philosophical texts. Explore topics of existentialism, ethics, determinism, and more. From short stories to first chapters, plays, selected works, and entire books work through this playlist at your own pace to really process these philosophical texts. Vurbl Classic Audiobook Picks

All "Philosophy Books" Audio

Fave Line Couldn't agree more.
Chapter III - Logic This short book is part of the Philosophies Ancient and Modern series, which attempts to make Western philosophy more accessible to the general public.In this volume, George Stock provides a concise primer on Stoicism, the ancient philosophy that maintained that the universe is governed entirely by fate, and that humans can achieve happiness only by cultivating a calm acceptance of the vicissitudes of life. Among the Stoics of the Greek and Roman world were its founder, Zeno, the former slave Epictetus, and the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius. George Stock discusses not only the Stoic ethics, but also less well-known aspects of Stoicism, such as its division of the branches of philosophy, its account of logic, and its natural philosophy.
(Summary by Leon Mire)

Listen to Chapter III - Logic. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter III - Logic and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter III - Logic on the fly.
Chapter 3 | Abschnitt 40 - 61 | Free Audiobook Nach heutigen Erkenntnissen (linguistisch, Zitierbelege etc.) entstand das Daodejing um 400 v. Chr.Laozi (chin. 老子, Lǎozǐ, W.-G. Lao Tzu „‚Alter Meister‘“), ein legendärer chinesischer Philosoph, soll im 6. Jahrhundert v. Chr. gelebt haben. Je nach Umschrift wird der Name auch Laotse, Lao-Tse oder Lao-tzu geschrieben.Erstveröffentlichung der Übersetzung 1910.Das Daodejing (chin. 道德經, Dàodéjīng) (ältere Umschrift: Tao Te King) ist eine Sammlung von Spruchkapiteln, die dem legendären Weisen Lǎozǐ zugeschrieben wird. Die Entstehungsgeschichte ist ungewiss und Gegenstand sinologischer Forschung. Ungeachtet weiterer Übersetzungen bedeuten Dào „Weg, Prinzip“ und „Sinn“, und Dé „Kraft, Leben“ und „Charisma, Tugend, Güte“. Jīng bezeichnet einen Leitfaden bzw. eine klassische Textsammlung. Die beiden namengebenden Begriffe stehen für etwas Unaussprechliches, auf dessen eigentliche Bedeutung das Buch hindeuten möchte. Aus diesem Grund werden sie auch oft unübersetzt belassen. Das Werk gilt als die Gründungsschrift des Daoismus. Obwohl dieser verschiedene Strömungen umfasst, die sich vom Dàodéjīng erheblich unterscheiden können, wird es von den Anhängern aller daoistischen Schulen als kanonischer, heiliger Text angesehen. (Zusammenfassung von Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 3 | Abschnitt 40 - 61 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 3 | Abschnitt 40 - 61 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 3 | Abschnitt 40 - 61 on the fly.
Chapter 10 Pascal's Pensées is widely considered to be a masterpiece, and a landmark in French prose. When commenting on one particular section (Thought #72), Sainte-Beuve praised it as the finest pages in the French language. Will Durant, in his 11-volume, comprehensive The Story of Civilization series, hailed it as "the most eloquent book in French prose." In Pensées, Pascal surveys several philosophical paradoxes: infinity and nothing, faith and reason, soul and matter, death and life, meaning and vanity—seemingly arriving at no definitive conclusions besides humility, ignorance, and grace. Rolling these into one he develops Pascal's Wager. (Summary from Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 10. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 10 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 10 on the fly.
Chapter 7 | Lesson VII. Power of Deduction | Free Audiobook One of three seminal philosophical works by the twelfth century Japanese Shogun, Yoritomo-Tashi. (From the Preface) He knows how to clothe his teachings in fable and appealing legend, and his exotic soul, so near and yet so far, reminds one of a flower, whose familiar aspect is transmuted into rare perfume.
By him the sternest questions are stripped of their hostile aspects and present themselves in the alluring form of the simplest allegories of striking poetic intensity.
When reading his works, one recalls unconsciously the orations of the ancient philosophers, delivered in those dazzling gardens, luxuriant in sunlight and fragrant with flowers.
In this far-away past, one sees also the silhouette of a majestic figure, whose school of philosophy became a religion, which interested the world because it spoke both of love and goodness.
But in spite of this fact, the doctrines of Yoritomo are of an imaginative type. His kingdom belongs to this world, and his theories seek less the joys of the hereafter than of that tangible happiness which is found in the realization of the manly virtues and in that effort to create perfect harmony from which flows perfect peace.
He takes us by the hand, in order to lead us to the center of that Eden of Knowledge where we have already discovered the art of persuasion, and that art, most difficult of all to acquire—the mastery of timidity.
Following him, we shall penetrate once more this Eden, that we may study with Yoritomo the manner of acquiring this art—somewhat unattractive perhaps but essentially primordial—called Common Sense. - Summary by B. Dangennes.

Listen to Chapter 7 | Lesson VII. Power of Deduction . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 7 | Lesson VII. Power of Deduction and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 7 | Lesson VII. Power of Deduction on the fly.
Chapter 9 | Section VI. Of Qualities Useful to Ourselves, Part I | Free Audiobook David Hume, an eminent Scottish philosopher, historian, and essayist, explores the nature and foundation of Morals in this book, which was written as a popular summary of Book III in A Treatise of Human Nature. Hume states: “There has been a controversy started of late, much better worth examination, concerning the general foundation of Morals; whether they be derived from Reason, or from Sentiment; whether we attain the knowledge of them by a chain of argument and induction, or by an immediate feeling and finer internal sense; whether, like all sound judgement of truth and falsehood, they should be the same to every rational intelligent being; or whether, like the perception of beauty and deformity, they be founded entirely on the particular fabric and constitution of the human species.” (Excerpted from Section I – Of the General Principles of Morals) (Summary from the text and adapted from Wikipedia by lubee930)

Listen to Chapter 9 | Section VI. Of Qualities Useful to Ourselves, Part I . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 9 | Section VI. Of Qualities Useful to Ourselves, Part I and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 9 | Section VI. Of Qualities Useful to Ourselves, Part I on the fly.
Chapter 10 | 10 Mischievously Overworking It | Free Audiobook Bennett asks us to consider our brains as the most wonderful machine, a machine which is the only thing in this world that we can control. As he writes: "I am simply bent on calling your attention to a fact which has perhaps wholly or partially escaped you -- namely, that you are the most fascinating bit of machinery that ever was."As ever, his prose is honeyed, his thoughts inspired, and his advice as relevant today as when it was written.

Listen to Chapter 10 | 10 Mischievously Overworking It . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 10 | 10 Mischievously Overworking It and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 10 | 10 Mischievously Overworking It on the fly.
Chapter 3 | 3 - The Power of Personal Influence | Free Audiobook Change your life by changing your thoughts. The Majesty of Calmness is your guide to attracting prosperity, manifesting opportunities, and managing stress—all while discovering the values most precious to you. (Summary by Andrea Fiore)

Listen to Chapter 3 | 3 - The Power of Personal Influence . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 3 | 3 - The Power of Personal Influence and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 3 | 3 - The Power of Personal Influence on the fly.
Chapter 6 | William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft Part 1 | Free Audiobook John Churton Collins was a literary critic who lived from 1848-1908. In 1904 John Collins became professor of English literature at Birmingham University (United Kingdom). He writes about the lives of English and German authors beginning with William Shakespeare (1564-1616) and ending with Alfred, Lord Tennyson(1809-1892). He wrote the book in response to On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic in History, by Thomas Carlyle (1840). His son, L.C. Collins, collected these essays from various sources after his father's death. (Summary by Craig Campbell)
Additional proof-listening by Larry Wilson.

Listen to Chapter 6 | William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft Part 1 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 6 | William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft Part 1 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 6 | William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft Part 1 on the fly.
Chapter 17 | The Seventh Lesson, The Unfoldment Of Consciousness. Part 2 | Free Audiobook The Book talks on the internal world of the self. The real nature of the subconscious mind, the way to control it, how ego comes into play and most frequently asked questions like "Who am I" are attempted to answer. (Summary by Uday Sagar)Note: William Walker Atkinson wrote this book using the pseudonym Yogi Ramacharaka.

Listen to Chapter 17 | The Seventh Lesson, The Unfoldment Of Consciousness. Part 2 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 17 | The Seventh Lesson, The Unfoldment Of Consciousness. Part 2 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 17 | The Seventh Lesson, The Unfoldment Of Consciousness. Part 2 on the fly.
11 - Part II, Sectio n III: Intro - Chapter I "How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortunes of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it." (from The Theory of Moral Sentiments)
note: This is the First edition, the 6th edition was revised and extra material added.

Listen to 11 - Part II, Sectio n III: Intro - Chapter I. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from 11 - Part II, Sectio n III: Intro - Chapter I and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save 11 - Part II, Sectio n III: Intro - Chapter I on the fly.
Chapter 2 | Yang Chus Garden of Pleasure | Free Audiobook At the Court of Liang at the period of Yang Chu, about 300 B.C., the philosophers were treated as guests of the reigning king, who reserved for them lodging and maintenance, and encouraged all who had any pretence to the pursuit of truth and wisdom. Whether or not Yang Chu was actually a native of the Wei State, or whether he came there drawn by the attraction of a critical and unrivalled audience, it is at least certain that he settled there as small proprietor, probably in the reign of King Hwei, and continued there till his death, about 250 B.C. One may imagine a condition of life in many respects somewhat analogous to the life of Epicurus in his famous Athenian Garden. To the philosopher of pleasure and contentment came pupils and disciples, discourses were held in much the same way as at an identical period discourses were held in the garden at Athens, and it is to these discourses, memorised and recorded by his favourite pupil Meng-sun-Yang, that we most probably owe the single fragment of the teaching of Yang Chu that remains, a fragment complete and explicit enough to enable us to form a clear estimate of his teaching and philosophy. - (from the Introduction by Hugh Cranmer-Byng)

Listen to Chapter 2 | Yang Chus Garden of Pleasure . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 2 | Yang Chus Garden of Pleasure and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 2 | Yang Chus Garden of Pleasure on the fly.
Chapter 18 | Demodocus (Vol.6 Pg.109) | Free Audiobook It is not generally agreed whether Plato was the author of any of these books.
I. Hippias Major (or Greater Hippias)
II. Second Alcibiades (or On Praying)
III. Theages
IV. The Rivals (or Rival Lovers)
V. Hipparchus
VI. Minos
VII. Clitopho (or Clitophon)
VIII. The Epistles (13 Letters)
IX. Epinomis (or The Philosopher)
X. Axiochus (or On Death)
XI. On Virtue
XII. On Justice
XIII. Sisyphus (or Upon Taking Counsel)
XIV. Demodocus
XV. Definitions
XVI. Timaeus Locrus (or The Treatise of Timaeus the Locrian, On the Soul of the World and Nature)- Summary by Geoffrey Edwards

Listen to Chapter 18 | Demodocus (Vol.6 Pg.109) . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 18 | Demodocus (Vol.6 Pg.109) and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 18 | Demodocus (Vol.6 Pg.109) on the fly.
Chapter 5 | Fifth Prapathaka | Free Audiobook The word Upanishad (upa-ni-shad) consists of, "Upa" means "near;" "ni" means "down;" "shad" means "to sit." Thus, Upanishad is to sit down near the teacher to discuss, learn, practice, and experience. There are some 200 or more Upanishads. Some are lost and are only known about because of being referenced in other Upanishads. The Chandogya-upanishad belongs to the Sama-veda. It ranks among the oldest Upanishads, dating to the Brahmana period of Vedic Sanskrit (before the 8th century BC). It figures as number 9 in the Muktika canon of 108 Upanishads. It is part of the Chandogya Brahmana, which has ten Prapathakas (Parts). The first two Prapathakas of the Brahmana deal with sacrifices and other forms of worship. The other eight Prapathakas and their Khandas (Chapters) constitute the Chandogya Upanishad. The 11 principal Upanishads to which Sankara appeals in his great commentary on the Vedanta-Surtras are: Chandogya, Talavakara or Kena, Aitareya, Kaushitaki, Vajasaneyi or Isha, Katha, Mundaka, Taittirtiyaka or Taittiriya, Brihadaranyaka, Svetasvatara, and Prasna. They are also called the 11 classical Upanishads or the fundamental Upanishads of the Vedanta Philosophy. The Upanishadic literature is not a religious scripture and is free from dogma and doctrines. It is not a part of any religion but is a philosophy for all times and for all. German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, impressed by the Upanishads, called the texts "the production of the highest human wisdom". (Summary by Jothi)

Listen to Chapter 5 | Fifth Prapathaka . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 5 | Fifth Prapathaka and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 5 | Fifth Prapathaka on the fly.
Book XVII: Chapters 1-4 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book XVII: Chapters 1-4. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book XVII: Chapters 1-4 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book XVII: Chapters 1-4 on the fly.
Chapter 10 | Propositions 180 to 199 | Free Audiobook The Elements of Theology (ΣΤΟΙΧΕΙΩΣΙΣ ΘΕΟΛΟΓΙΚΗ) was written by the Greek Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus (ΠΡΟΚΛΟΣ) and translated by Thomas Taylor who named his youngest son Thomas Proclus Taylor. This book consists of 211 propositions, each followed by a proof, beginning from the existence of the One (divine Unity) and ending with the descent of individual souls into the material world. Saint Thomas Aquinas recognized that the Liber de Causis (Book of Causes), which had been attributed to Aristotle, was actually a summary of the Elements of Theology, likely written by an Arabic interpreter. - Summary adapted from Wikipedia by Geoffrey Edwards

Listen to Chapter 10 | Propositions 180 to 199 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 10 | Propositions 180 to 199 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 10 | Propositions 180 to 199 on the fly.
Chapter 6 | Third Mundaka - Second Khanda | Free Audiobook The word Upanishad (upa-ni-shad) consists of, "Upa" means "near;" "ni" means "down;" "shad" means "to sit." Thus, Upanishad is to sit down near the teacher to discuss, learn, practice, and experience. There are some 200 or more Upanishads. Some are lost and are only known about because of being referenced in other Upanishads.Most of the Upanishads were kept secret for centuries, only passed on to others orally in the form of Shloka (a category of verse line developed from the Vedic Anustubh meter).The Mundaka-Upanishad is embedded inside the Atharva-vedha. Mundaka (Sanskrit: मुण्डक) literally means "shaved (as in shaved head)". The word as title of the Upanishad possibly refers to "knowledge that shaves, or liberates, one of errors and ignorance". It is a poetic verse style Upanishad, with 64 verses, written in the form of mantras. However, these mantras are not used in rituals, rather they are used for teaching and meditation on spiritual knowledge. It contains three Mundakams (parts), each with two sections.This Upanishad is considered post-Buddhist, the exact chronology is unclear. The 11 principal Upanishads to which Sankara appeals in his great commentary on the Vedanta-Surtras are: Chandogya, Talavakara or Kena, Aitareya, Kaushitaki, Vajasaneyi or Isha, Katha, Mundaka, Taittirtiyaka or Taittiriya, Brihadaranyaka, Svetasvatara, and Prasna. They are also called the 11 classical Upanishads or the fundamental Upanishads of the Vedanta Philosophy. Apart from these, Maitrayana-Brahmana-Upanishad is also considered as an important Upanishad. The Upanishadic literature is not a religious scripture and is free from dogma and doctrines. It is not a part of any religion but is a philosophy for all times and for all. German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, impressed by the Upanishads, called the texts "the production of the highest human wisdom". Summary by Jothi

Listen to Chapter 6 | Third Mundaka - Second Khanda . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 6 | Third Mundaka - Second Khanda and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 6 | Third Mundaka - Second Khanda on the fly.
12 - Book V Chapters XXI-XXXII (Text 459) On the Ends of Good and Evil (Latin: DE FINIBUS BONORUM ET MALORUM) discusses Skeptic, Epicurean, Stoic, Peripatetic and Academic views on the good life. Written by Marcus Tullius Cicero. Translated by Harris Rackham. (Summary by Geoffrey Edwards)

Listen to 12 - Book V Chapters XXI-XXXII (Text 459). Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from 12 - Book V Chapters XXI-XXXII (Text 459) and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save 12 - Book V Chapters XXI-XXXII (Text 459) on the fly.
Chapters 20-24 of Book II Prior Analytics is the third of Aristotle's six texts on logic which are collectively known as the Organon ("Instrument"). In Prior Analytics Aristotle conducts a formal study of arguments. In logic an argument is a series of true or false statements which lead to a true or false conclusion. Aristotle identifies valid and invalid forms of arguments called syllogisms. A syllogism is an argument consisting of three sentences: two premises and a conclusion. Of the entire Aristotelian corpus, Aristotle gives priority to the study of his treatises on Logic. (Adapted from Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapters 20-24 of Book II. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapters 20-24 of Book II and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapters 20-24 of Book II on the fly.
Chapter 38 | 05 - Chapitre 11 | Free Audiobook « Cet ouvrage a pour objet les lois, les coutumes et les divers usages de tous les peuples de la terre. On peut dire que le sujet est immense, puisqu'il embrasse toutes les institutions qui sont reçues parmi les hommes ; puisque l'auteur distingue ces institutions ; qu'il examine celles qui conviennent le plus à la société et à chaque société ; qu'il en cherche l'origine ; qu'il en découvre les causes physiques et morales ; qu'il examine celles qui ont un degré de bonté par elles-mêmes et celles qui n'en ont aucun; que de deux pratiques pernicieuses, il cherche celle qui l'est le plus et celle qui l'est le moins ; qu'il y discute celles qui peuvent avoir de bons effets à un certain égard, et de mauvais dans un autre. Il a cru ses recherches utiles, parce que le bon sens consiste beaucoup à connaître les nuances des choses. » (Résumé par Montesquieu)

Listen to Chapter 38 | 05 - Chapitre 11 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 38 | 05 - Chapitre 11 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 38 | 05 - Chapitre 11 on the fly.
Chapter 103 | 08 - Chapitre 19 | Free Audiobook « Cet ouvrage a pour objet les lois, les coutumes et les divers usages de tous les peuples de la terre. On peut dire que le sujet est immense, puisqu'il embrasse toutes les institutions qui sont reçues parmi les hommes ; puisque l'auteur distingue ces institutions ; qu'il examine celles qui conviennent le plus à la société et à chaque société ; qu'il en cherche l'origine ; qu'il en découvre les causes physiques et morales ; qu'il examine celles qui ont un degré de bonté par elles-mêmes et celles qui n'en ont aucun; que de deux pratiques pernicieuses, il cherche celle qui l'est le plus et celle qui l'est le moins ; qu'il y discute celles qui peuvent avoir de bons effets à un certain égard, et de mauvais dans un autre. Il a cru ses recherches utiles, parce que le bon sens consiste beaucoup à connaître les nuances des choses. » (Résumé par Montesquieu)

Listen to Chapter 103 | 08 - Chapitre 19 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 103 | 08 - Chapitre 19 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 103 | 08 - Chapitre 19 on the fly.
Chapter 26 | Luku 26 | Free Audiobook Ruhtinas on erään Firenzeläisen valtiosihteerin, Niccolo Machiavellin, ohjekirja ruhtinaille, jotka haluavat säilyttää tai lisätä ruhtinaskuntainsa valtaa. Se on kirjoitettu renessansin ajan Italiassa, jolloin koko maa oli jakautunut pieniin, toisiansa nokitteleviin kaupunkivaltioihin ja se on omistettu sille ruhtinaalle, jota Machiavelli toivoo koko kansan yhdistäjäksi. Ruhtinas on yksi maailman luetuimmista ja arvostetuimmista kirjallisista teoksista. Vai pitäisikö sanoa epäarvostetuimmista, sillä se oli pitkään Indexissä, eli Kirkon kiellettyjen kirjojen listalla ja herättänyt lukijoissa läpi historian paljon kauhistelua ja pelon sekasita kunnioitusta. Sitä pidetään reaalipolitiikan peruskirjana, jossa Machiavelli kertoo suoraan miten asiat ovat, ei miten niiden pitäisi olla. Monet ovat löytäneet Machiavellin ohjeet hyödyllisiksi myös nykyajan arki- ja liike-elämässä. - Summary by Harri Tapani Ylilammi

Listen to Chapter 26 | Luku 26 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 26 | Luku 26 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 26 | Luku 26 on the fly.
Chapter 3 | Premire partie | Free Audiobook De l’inégalité parmi les hommes est un essai philosophique d’une centaine de pages environ, richement annoté par l’auteur, introduit par une lettre de louanges à la République de Genève ainsi que par une préface de l’auteur datée du 12 Juin 1754.

Listen to Chapter 3 | Premire partie . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 3 | Premire partie and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 3 | Premire partie on the fly.
Chapter 0 | 0 Preface | Free Audiobook The Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysic of Morals, also known as The Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals or Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals or Grounding of the Metaphysics of Morals, is Immanuel Kant's first contribution to moral philosophy. It argues for an a priori basis for morality. Where the Critique of Pure Reason laid out Kant's metaphysical and epistemological ideas, this relatively short, primarily meta-ethical, work was intended to outline and define the concepts and arguments shaping his future work The Metaphysics of Morals. However, the latter work is much less readable than the Fundamental Principles. (Summary from Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 0 | 0 Preface . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 0 | 0 Preface and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 0 | 0 Preface on the fly.
Chapter XXXVIII Of the Signification in Scripture of Eternal Life, Hell, Salvation, the World to Come, and Redemption In Books 3 and 4 of Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes elaborates on the political philosophy set forth in the first two books, by considering the nature of a Christian commonwealth. Book 3 begins with a wealth of biblical scholarship, directed at establishing the authority of Scripture while at the same time undermining modern claims to supernatural revelation that would subvert civil law. Hobbes concludes that we cannot be sure of anyone else's divine revelation, and that religious authority is therefore subordinate to civil power. Book 4, titled “Of the Kingdom of Darkness,” sets forth the various ways in which Scripture has been misinterpreted by the church, according to Hobbes, in mixing pagan elements with Christianity.
(Summary adapted from Wikipedia by Leon Mire)

Listen to Chapter XXXVIII Of the Signification in Scripture of Eternal Life, Hell, Salvation, the World to Come, and Redemption. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter XXXVIII Of the Signification in Scripture of Eternal Life, Hell, Salvation, the World to Come, and Redemption and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter XXXVIII Of the Signification in Scripture of Eternal Life, Hell, Salvation, the World to Come, and Redemption on the fly.
11 Hydriotaphia - Chapter 2 Religio Medici (The Religion of a Doctor) sets out Sir Thomas Browne's spiritual testament as well as being an early psychological self-portrait. In its day, the book was a European best-seller. It was published in 1643 by the newly-qualified physician, and its unorthodox views placed it swiftly upon the Papal Index Librorum Prohibitorum in 1645. Although predominantly concerned with Christian faith, the Religio also meanders into digressions upon alchemy, hermetic philosophy, astrology, and physiognomy.
Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial, or a Discourse of the Sepulchral Urns lately found in Norfolk, was published in 1658. Its nominal subject was the discovery of a Roman urn burial in Norfolk. The discovery of these remains prompts Browne to deliver, first, a careful description of the antiquities found, and then a careful survey of most of the burial and funerary customs, ancient and current, of which his era was aware. The most famous part of the work, though, is the fifth chapter, where Browne quite explicitly turns to discuss man's struggles with mortality, and the uncertainty of his fate and fame in this world and the next, to produce an extended funerary meditation tinged with melancholia. The changes wrought by time and eternity, the fleetingness of mortal fame, and our feeble attempts to cope with the certainty of death are Browne's subjects. Yet, at the same time, Browne can be tersely witty, mocking human vainglory. A piece of exquisite baroque prose that George Saintsbury called "the longest piece, perhaps, of absolutely sublime rhetoric to be found in the prose literature of the world," Hydriotaphia displays an astonishing command of English prose rhythm and diction. (Summary from Wikipedia)

Listen to 11 Hydriotaphia - Chapter 2. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from 11 Hydriotaphia - Chapter 2 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save 11 Hydriotaphia - Chapter 2 on the fly.
Chapter 19 | 19 - Vol I Book I Part III Section IV - Of The Component Parts Of Our Reasonings Concerning Cause And Effect | Free Audiobook This book, published in two volumes called "books" by the author, is a treatment of everything from the origin of our ideas to how they are to be divided. It includes important statements of Scepticism and Hume's experimental method. Part 1 deals with the nature of ideas. Part 2 deals with the ideas of space and time. Part 3 deals with knowledge and probability. Part 4 deals with skeptical and other systems of philosophy, including a discussion of the soul and personal identity. (Summary by Wikipedia)This is a recording of Volume I (or Book 1). Volume II (which contains Books 2 and 3) is also available as a Librivox audiobook.

Listen to Chapter 19 | 19 - Vol I Book I Part III Section IV - Of The Component Parts Of Our Reasonings Concerning Cause And Effect . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 19 | 19 - Vol I Book I Part III Section IV - Of The Component Parts Of Our Reasonings Concerning Cause And Effect and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 19 | 19 - Vol I Book I Part III Section IV - Of The Component Parts Of Our Reasonings Concerning Cause And Effect on the fly.
Chapter 21 | 21 - Vol II Book II Part II Section IX - Of The Mixture Of Benevolence And Anger With Compassion And Malice | Free Audiobook This book, published in two volumes called "books" by the author, is a treatment of everything from the origin of our ideas to how they are to be divided. It includes important statements of Scepticism and Hume's experimental method. Part 1 deals with the nature of ideas. Part 2 deals with the ideas of space and time. Part 3 deals with knowledge and probability. Part 4 deals with skeptical and other systems of philosophy, including a discussion of the soul and personal identity. (Summary by Wikipedia)
This volume contains Books 2 and 3. Volume 1 (or Book 1) is also available as a Librivox audiobook.
Additional proof-listening was done by linty_pupik.

Listen to Chapter 21 | 21 - Vol II Book II Part II Section IX - Of The Mixture Of Benevolence And Anger With Compassion And Malice . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 21 | 21 - Vol II Book II Part II Section IX - Of The Mixture Of Benevolence And Anger With Compassion And Malice and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 21 | 21 - Vol II Book II Part II Section IX - Of The Mixture Of Benevolence And Anger With Compassion And Malice on the fly.
Chapter 12 | The Institutions of Suicide and Redress | Free Audiobook Bushido: The Soul of Japan written by Inazo Nitobe was one of the first books on samurai ethics that was originally written in English for a Western audience, and has been subsequently translated into many other languages (also Japanese). Nitobe found in Bushido, the Way of the Warrior, the sources of the virtues most admired by his people: rectitude, courage, benevolence, politeness, sincerity, honor, loyalty and self-control, and he uses his deep knowledge of Western culture to draw comparisons with Medieval Chivalry, Philosophy, and Christianity. (Summary by Availle)

Listen to Chapter 12 | The Institutions of Suicide and Redress . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 12 | The Institutions of Suicide and Redress and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 12 | The Institutions of Suicide and Redress on the fly.
Chapter 75 | Our Enemies | Free Audiobook A Concise, Reasoned, and Popular Exposition of Catholic Morals. The ten commandments, vice and virtue from the Catholic perspective.

The contents of this volume appeared originally in The Catholic Transcript, of Hartford, Connecticut, in weekly installments, from February, 1901, to February, 1903.

Listen to Chapter 75 | Our Enemies . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 75 | Our Enemies and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 75 | Our Enemies on the fly.
Chapter 0 | Introduction and Preface | Free Audiobook "Human, all-too-Human, is the monument of a crisis. It is entitled: 'A book for free spirits,' and almost every line in it represents a victory—in its pages I freed myself from everything foreign to my real nature. Idealism is foreign to me: the title says, 'Where you see ideal things, I see things which are only—human alas! all-too-human!' I know man better—the term 'free spirit' must here be understood in no other sense than this: a freed man, who has once more taken possession of himself." (Nietzsche; Ecce Homo, p. 75.)

Listen to Chapter 0 | Introduction and Preface . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 0 | Introduction and Preface and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 0 | Introduction and Preface on the fly.
Chapter 5 | Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description | Free Audiobook This 1912 book remains among the most widely-used and well-written introductions to philosophy in English. It was aimed to be an accessible introduction to philosophy for the average shopkeeper in England in 1912. Despite its accessibility It has engaged scholarly philosophical commentators on a range of issues raised in the work. Above all it conveys in easy and witty manner the philosophical frame of mind to those that have never encountered it before. It was almost immediately, and remains today, a classic. This recording is dedicated to Jill Evans, Esq. (Landon D. C. Elkind)

Listen to Chapter 5 | Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 5 | Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 5 | Knowledge by Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description on the fly.
Chapter XXXIX: One Unwavering Aim Published in 1894, this is the first book by the renowned inspirational author, Dr. Orison Swett Marden. Pushing to the Front is the product of many years of hard work, and marks a turning point in the life of Dr. Marden. He rewrote it following an accidental fire that brought the five-thousand-plus page manuscript to flames. It went on to become the most popular personal-development book of its time, and is a timeless classic in its genre. Filled with stories of success, triumph and the surmounting of difficulties, it is especially well-targeted at the adolescent or young adult. It is a book to inspire the reader towards a noble sense of integrity, a strong moral foundation, and solid, enduring self-discipline to let the reader put each foot forward as the leader they are meant to be. (Summary by Luke Sartor)

Listen to Chapter XXXIX: One Unwavering Aim. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter XXXIX: One Unwavering Aim and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter XXXIX: One Unwavering Aim on the fly.
Chapter 36 | 36 - PRAYER; EVIL; THE PROGRESS OF THE SOUL | Free Audiobook “Much has already been written of the visit of Abdul Baha, Abbas Effendi, to Europe,” writes Lady Blomfield in her Preface to Paris Talks, “During his stay at Paris at 4, Avenue de Comoens, he gave short “Talks” each morning to those who crowded, eager to hear His Teaching. These listeners were of many Nationalities and types of thought, learned and unlearned, members of various religious sects, Theosophists and Agnostics, Materialists and Spiritualists, etc., etc. Abdul Baha spoke in Persian, which was translated into French. Of these “Talks” my two daughters, my friend and I took notes. Many friends asked us to publish these notes in English, but we hesitated. At length when Abdul Baha himself asked us to do so we, of course, consented—in spite of our feeling that our pen is “too weak for such high message.”” Paris Talks is a book transcribed from talks given by `Abdu'l-Bahá, the son and successor of Bahá’u’lláh, the Founder of the Bahá’í Faith, while in Paris. It was originally published as “Talks by `Abdu'l-Bahá Given in Paris” in 1912. `Abdu'l-Bahá did not read and authenticate the transcripts of his talks in Paris, and thus the authenticity of the talks is not known. Shoghi Effendi, the Guardian of the Bahá’í Faith, has said that while the texts are not authenticated, the compilations can still be used by Bahá’ís and in the future work will be done to find which parts are authentic. Lady Blomfield's copious notes are the basis of the volume. Lady Sara Louisa Blomfield [née Ryan] (1859-1939), who was given the title of Sitárih Khánum by `Abdu'l-Bahá, was the second wife to noted Victorian era architect Sir Arthur Blomfield, who died in 1899. She became a Bahá’í in 1907 and later served on the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of the British Isles for eight of its first eleven years. (Introduction by Nicholas James Bridgewater)

Listen to Chapter 36 | 36 - PRAYER; EVIL; THE PROGRESS OF THE SOUL . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 36 | 36 - PRAYER; EVIL; THE PROGRESS OF THE SOUL and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 36 | 36 - PRAYER; EVIL; THE PROGRESS OF THE SOUL on the fly.
Chapter 8 | Coming Into Fullness of Power | Free Audiobook Trine tells us that by connecting and harmonizing with the Universe we attract love, health, peace and success. Trines' writings may have been the most important to the "New Thought" movement of the late 1800's and early 1900's which was the forerunner to the "New Age" movement. (Summary by kirk202)

Listen to Chapter 8 | Coming Into Fullness of Power . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 8 | Coming Into Fullness of Power and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 8 | Coming Into Fullness of Power on the fly.
Chapter 20 | 19 - The Doom of Religion; The Necessity of Atheism - Part 2 | Free Audiobook Plain speaking is necessary in any discussion of religion, for if the freethinker attacks the religious dogmas with hesitation, the orthodox believer assumes that it is with regret that the freethinker would remove the crutch that supports the orthodox. And all religious beliefs are "crutches" hindering the free locomotive efforts of an advancing humanity. There are no problems related to human progress and happiness in this age which any theology can solve, and which the teachings of freethought cannot do better and without the aid of encumbrances. (Summary from the preface)

Listen to Chapter 20 | 19 - The Doom of Religion; The Necessity of Atheism - Part 2 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 20 | 19 - The Doom of Religion; The Necessity of Atheism - Part 2 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 20 | 19 - The Doom of Religion; The Necessity of Atheism - Part 2 on the fly.
Chapter 27 | Christian Apologies: The Universality of Religious Belief | Free Audiobook "I have been asked why I have opposed Christianity. I have several reasons, which shall appear in due course. At present I offer one.
I oppose Christianity because it is not true.
No honest man will ask for any other reason. But it may be asked why I say that Christianity is not true; and that is a very proper question, which I shall do my best to answer." Thus states the author in one of the first chapters of this book, and subsequently he lays down his apology, drawing his conclusions from numerous books published by believers and unbelievers alike, and, of course, from the bible itself. (Summary by Availle, with a quote from the book.)

Listen to Chapter 27 | Christian Apologies: The Universality of Religious Belief . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 27 | Christian Apologies: The Universality of Religious Belief and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 27 | Christian Apologies: The Universality of Religious Belief on the fly.
Chapter 2 | The Supreme Fact of the Universe | Free Audiobook Trine tells us that by connecting and harmonizing with the Universe we attract love, health, peace and success. Trines' writings may have been the most important to the "New Thought" movement of the late 1800's and early 1900's which was the forerunner to the "New Age" movement. (Summary by kirk202)

Listen to Chapter 2 | The Supreme Fact of the Universe . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 2 | The Supreme Fact of the Universe and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 2 | The Supreme Fact of the Universe on the fly.
Chapter 11 | XI. Empirical and Scientific Thinking | Free Audiobook A book written by an American education philosopher in which he proposed “This scientific attitude of mind might, conceivably, be quite irrelevant to teaching children and youth. But this book also represents the conviction that such is not the case; that the native and unspoiled attitude of childhood, marked by ardent curiosity, fertile imagination, and love of experimental inquiry, is near, very near, to the attitude of the scientific mind. If these pages assist any to appreciate this kinship and to consider seriously how its recognition in educational practice would make for individual happiness and the reduction of social waste, ...”

Excerpt From: John Dewey. “How We Think.” - Summary by Linda Andrus

Listen to Chapter 11 | XI. Empirical and Scientific Thinking . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 11 | XI. Empirical and Scientific Thinking and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 11 | XI. Empirical and Scientific Thinking on the fly.
Chapter 43 | 43 - Vol II Book III Part II Section VII - Of The Origin Of Government | Free Audiobook This book, published in two volumes called "books" by the author, is a treatment of everything from the origin of our ideas to how they are to be divided. It includes important statements of Scepticism and Hume's experimental method. Part 1 deals with the nature of ideas. Part 2 deals with the ideas of space and time. Part 3 deals with knowledge and probability. Part 4 deals with skeptical and other systems of philosophy, including a discussion of the soul and personal identity. (Summary by Wikipedia)
This volume contains Books 2 and 3. Volume 1 (or Book 1) is also available as a Librivox audiobook.
Additional proof-listening was done by linty_pupik.

Listen to Chapter 43 | 43 - Vol II Book III Part II Section VII - Of The Origin Of Government . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 43 | 43 - Vol II Book III Part II Section VII - Of The Origin Of Government and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 43 | 43 - Vol II Book III Part II Section VII - Of The Origin Of Government on the fly.
Chapter 90 | 08 - Chapitre 6 | Free Audiobook « Cet ouvrage a pour objet les lois, les coutumes et les divers usages de tous les peuples de la terre. On peut dire que le sujet est immense, puisqu'il embrasse toutes les institutions qui sont reçues parmi les hommes ; puisque l'auteur distingue ces institutions ; qu'il examine celles qui conviennent le plus à la société et à chaque société ; qu'il en cherche l'origine ; qu'il en découvre les causes physiques et morales ; qu'il examine celles qui ont un degré de bonté par elles-mêmes et celles qui n'en ont aucun; que de deux pratiques pernicieuses, il cherche celle qui l'est le plus et celle qui l'est le moins ; qu'il y discute celles qui peuvent avoir de bons effets à un certain égard, et de mauvais dans un autre. Il a cru ses recherches utiles, parce que le bon sens consiste beaucoup à connaître les nuances des choses. » (Résumé par Montesquieu)

Listen to Chapter 90 | 08 - Chapitre 6 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 90 | 08 - Chapitre 6 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 90 | 08 - Chapitre 6 on the fly.
Chapter 187 | 13 - Chapitre 5 | Free Audiobook « Cet ouvrage a pour objet les lois, les coutumes et les divers usages de tous les peuples de la terre. On peut dire que le sujet est immense, puisqu'il embrasse toutes les institutions qui sont reçues parmi les hommes ; puisque l'auteur distingue ces institutions ; qu'il examine celles qui conviennent le plus à la société et à chaque société ; qu'il en cherche l'origine ; qu'il en découvre les causes physiques et morales ; qu'il examine celles qui ont un degré de bonté par elles-mêmes et celles qui n'en ont aucun; que de deux pratiques pernicieuses, il cherche celle qui l'est le plus et celle qui l'est le moins ; qu'il y discute celles qui peuvent avoir de bons effets à un certain égard, et de mauvais dans un autre. Il a cru ses recherches utiles, parce que le bon sens consiste beaucoup à connaître les nuances des choses. » (Résumé par Montesquieu)

Listen to Chapter 187 | 13 - Chapitre 5 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 187 | 13 - Chapitre 5 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 187 | 13 - Chapitre 5 on the fly.
Chapter 14 | 14 A Man and His Environment | Free Audiobook Bennett asks us to consider our brains as the most wonderful machine, a machine which is the only thing in this world that we can control. As he writes: "I am simply bent on calling your attention to a fact which has perhaps wholly or partially escaped you -- namely, that you are the most fascinating bit of machinery that ever was."As ever, his prose is honeyed, his thoughts inspired, and his advice as relevant today as when it was written.

Listen to Chapter 14 | 14 A Man and His Environment . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 14 | 14 A Man and His Environment and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 14 | 14 A Man and His Environment on the fly.
Chapter 9 | Part 9 | Free Audiobook In Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, philosopher David Hume examines whether belief in God can be rational. The work takes the form of a debate between three characters: Cleanthes, who argues that the existence and nature of God can be empirically verified; Demea, who argues that God is completely beyond human knowledge; and Philo, a philosophical skeptic widely thought to represent Hume's own beliefs. Much of the debate centers around Cleanthes' presentation of the analogical argument from design. According to this argument, the complexity and beauty of the universe can only be explained by inferring an intelligent designer, in the same way that one would infer a designer if one came across an intricately complicated machine. Philo presents several objections to this argument, with rejoinders by Cleanthes and occasional interjections by Demea. (Summary by Leon Mire)

Listen to Chapter 9 | Part 9 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 9 | Part 9 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 9 | Part 9 on the fly.
Chapter 1: Sense-certainty, or the this and "meaning" Phänomenologie des Geistes (1807) is Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's most important and widely discussed philosophical work. Hegel's first book, it describes the three-stage dialectical life of Spirit. The title can be translated as either The Phenomenology of Spirit or The Phenomenology of Mind, because the German word Geist has both meanings.
Phenomenology was the basis of Hegel's later philosophy and marked a significant development in German idealism after Kant. Focusing on topics in metaphysics, epistemology, physics, ethics, history, religion, perception, consciousness, and political philosophy, The Phenomenology is where Hegel develops his concepts of dialectic (including the Master-slave dialectic), absolute idealism, ethical life, and Aufhebung. The book had a profound effect in Western philosophy, and "has been praised and blamed for the development of existentialism, communism, fascism, death of God theology, and historicist nihilism." - Summary by Wikipedia

Listen to Chapter 1: Sense-certainty, or the this and "meaning". Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 1: Sense-certainty, or the this and "meaning" and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 1: Sense-certainty, or the this and "meaning" on the fly.
Chapter 0 | Translator's Preface | Free Audiobook Phänomenologie des Geistes (1807) is Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's most important and widely discussed philosophical work. Hegel's first book, it describes the three-stage dialectical life of Spirit. The title can be translated as either The Phenomenology of Spirit or The Phenomenology of Mind, because the German word Geist has both meanings.
Phenomenology was the basis of Hegel's later philosophy and marked a significant development in German idealism after Kant. Focusing on topics in metaphysics, epistemology, physics, ethics, history, religion, perception, consciousness, and political philosophy, The Phenomenology is where Hegel develops his concepts of dialectic (including the Master-slave dialectic), absolute idealism, ethical life, and Aufhebung. The book had a profound effect in Western philosophy, and "has been praised and blamed for the development of existentialism, communism, fascism, death of God theology, and historicist nihilism." - Summary by Wikipedia

Listen to Chapter 0 | Translator's Preface . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 0 | Translator's Preface and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 0 | Translator's Preface on the fly.
Chapter 9 | Philosophy during the Tragic Age of the Greeks, Part 3 | Free Audiobook The essays contained in this volume treat of various subjects. With the exception of perhaps one we must consider all these papers as fragments. Written during the early Seventies, and intended mostly as prefaces, they are extremely interesting, since traces of Nietzsche's later tenets — like Slave and Master morality, the Superman — can be found everywhere. But they are also very valuable on account of the young philosopher's daring and able handling of difficult and abstruse subjects. "Truth and Falsity," and "The Greek Woman" are probably the two essays which will prove most attractive to the average reader. - from the Preface.

Listen to Chapter 9 | Philosophy during the Tragic Age of the Greeks, Part 3 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 9 | Philosophy during the Tragic Age of the Greeks, Part 3 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 9 | Philosophy during the Tragic Age of the Greeks, Part 3 on the fly.
Chapter 7 | 07 - Concerning the Origin of the Ideas of Justice and Mercy | Free Audiobook The book is a series of independent demonstrations, the results of which accumulate to the final conclusion, that the Christian religion is necessarily the only religion possible to meet the spiritual wants of mankind. In arriving at this conclusion, the different arts and processes of revealed religion are examined, and their adaptedness to perform their several functions in elevating, purifying, and actuating the human soul to benevolent effort, is determined, and, finally, the practical operation of the system is shown, as a matter of undeniable experience, to produce the complete and necessary result required. . . . As four is contained in twelve three times, and as twelve is the only number in which four is three times contained; so the capacities and susceptibilities of the human soul being given, and the power and adaptations of revelation being ascertained, the result is obtained (may it not be said with mathematical certainty?) that Christianity, as taught by the interpretation and experience of evangelical Christians, is the true religion and the only religion possible for human nature. (Introduction from Preface to 2nd Edition.)

Listen to Chapter 7 | 07 - Concerning the Origin of the Ideas of Justice and Mercy . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 7 | 07 - Concerning the Origin of the Ideas of Justice and Mercy and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 7 | 07 - Concerning the Origin of the Ideas of Justice and Mercy on the fly.
Chapter 7 | Part 7 (Sections 241-260) | Free Audiobook The She-rab Dong-bu (Tree of Wisdom) is a metrical translation in Tibetan of a Sanscrit ethical work entitled Prajnya Danda, written by Nagarjuna who flourished in the fourth century of the Buddhist era (about 100 B.C.), The Tibetan version was probably made about the 11th century of our era but the exact date has not been determined. It is included in the Ten-gyur, ངོ་ section, volume གོ་, beginning at leaf 165. The Tibetan translator describes it as the second volume but I cannot say whether the remainder of the work has been preserved in Tibetan--the Sanscrit original is apparently lost. - W.L. Campbell

Listen to Chapter 7 | Part 7 (Sections 241-260) . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 7 | Part 7 (Sections 241-260) and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 7 | Part 7 (Sections 241-260) on the fly.
Book XVI: Chapters 21-31 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book XVI: Chapters 21-31. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book XVI: Chapters 21-31 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book XVI: Chapters 21-31 on the fly.
Book XVIII: Chapters 12-22 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book XVIII: Chapters 12-22. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book XVIII: Chapters 12-22 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book XVIII: Chapters 12-22 on the fly.
Chapter 8 | Seventh Prapthaka | Free Audiobook The word Upanishad (upa-ni-shad) consists of, "Upa" means "near;" "ni" means "down;" "shad" means "to sit." Thus, Upanishad is to sit down near the teacher to discuss, learn, practice, and experience. There are some 200 or more Upanishads. Some are lost and are only known about because of being referenced in other Upanishads. Most of the Upanishads were kept secret for centuries, only passed on to others orally in the form of Shlokas (a category of verse line developed from the Vedic Anustubh meter).Maitra (Sanskrit: मैत्र) and Maitri (मैत्री) are related words which literally mean "kindly, benevolent, good will, amity, friend of all creatures". The Maitrayaniya Upanishad is associated with the Maitrayanas school of the Yajurveda. It discusses metaphysical questions relating to Atman (Self, Soul). It is a prose style Upanishad with seven Prapathakas (or lessons). The Maitrayaniya Upanishad was probably composed in late 1st millennium BCE.The 11 principal Upanishads to which Sankara appeals in his great commentary on the Vedanta-Surtras are: Chandogya, Talavakara or Kena, Aitareya, Kaushitaki, Vajasaneyi or Isha, Katha, Mundaka, Taittirtiyaka or Taittiriya, Brihadaranyaka, Svetasvatara, and Prasna. They are also called the 11 classical Upanishads or the fundamental Upanishads of the Vedanta Philosophy. Apart from these, Maitrayana-Brahmana-Upanishad is also considered as an important Upanishad. The Upanishadic literature is not a religious scripture and is free from dogma and doctrines. It is not a part of any religion but is a philosophy for all times and for all. German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, impressed by the Upanishads, called the texts "the production of the highest human wisdom". Summary by Jothi

Listen to Chapter 8 | Seventh Prapthaka . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 8 | Seventh Prapthaka and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 8 | Seventh Prapthaka on the fly.
Chapter 0 | <a href="http://bartleby.com/44/1/1001.html">Introductory Note | Free Audiobook Promoting virtues such as filial devotion, compassion, loyalty, and propriety, these dialogues between the ancient Chinese philosopher Confucius and his disciples comprise the crux of Confucianism. (Summary by Andrea L).

A Chinese version is available: 論語 Lún Yǔ (Analects)

Listen to Chapter 0 | <a href="http://bartleby.com/44/1/1001.html">Introductory Note . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 0 | <a href="http://bartleby.com/44/1/1001.html">Introductory Note and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 0 | <a href="http://bartleby.com/44/1/1001.html">Introductory Note on the fly.
Chapter 7 | Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 6 | Free Audiobook A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge (commonly called Treatise when referring to Berkeley's works) is a 1710 work, in English, by Irish Empiricist philosopher George Berkeley. This book largely seeks to refute the claims made by Berkeley's contemporary John Locke about the nature of human perception. Whilst, like all the Empiricist philosophers, both Locke and Berkeley agreed that we are having experiences, regardless of whether material objects exist, Berkeley sought to prove that the outside world (the world which causes the ideas one has within one's mind) is also composed solely of ideas. Berkeley did this by suggesting that "Ideas can only resemble Ideas" - the mental ideas that we possess can only resemble other ideas (not material objects) and thus the external world consists not of physical form, but rather of ideas. This world is (or, at least, was) given logic and regularity by some other force, which Berkeley concludes is God. ( Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 7 | Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 6 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 7 | Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 6 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 7 | Of the Principles of Human Knowledge Part 6 on the fly.
Chapter 42 | 42 - Vol II Book III Part II Section VI - Some Farther Reflections Concerning Justice And Injustice | Free Audiobook This book, published in two volumes called "books" by the author, is a treatment of everything from the origin of our ideas to how they are to be divided. It includes important statements of Scepticism and Hume's experimental method. Part 1 deals with the nature of ideas. Part 2 deals with the ideas of space and time. Part 3 deals with knowledge and probability. Part 4 deals with skeptical and other systems of philosophy, including a discussion of the soul and personal identity. (Summary by Wikipedia)
This volume contains Books 2 and 3. Volume 1 (or Book 1) is also available as a Librivox audiobook.
Additional proof-listening was done by linty_pupik.

Listen to Chapter 42 | 42 - Vol II Book III Part II Section VI - Some Farther Reflections Concerning Justice And Injustice . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 42 | 42 - Vol II Book III Part II Section VI - Some Farther Reflections Concerning Justice And Injustice and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 42 | 42 - Vol II Book III Part II Section VI - Some Farther Reflections Concerning Justice And Injustice on the fly.
Chapter 2 | A comparison between the fourth gospel and the three synoptics | Free Audiobook My Path to Atheism is a remarkable document in many ways, not least that it was written by a woman in Victorian England, not the most open free-thinking of societies, especially for women at that time. It needed a remarkable woman to write such a revolutionary and to 19th century minds, heretical document in a society where the Church had such a stronghold. Besant herself was originally married to a clergyman, but her increasingly anti-religious views and writings led to a legal separation. She went on to become a member of the National Secular Society and thence to co-edit the National Reformer, which put forth ideas on revolutionary ideas at the time such as trades unions, national education, birth control and so on. In 1877 Besant published this book 'My Path to Atheism' which was compiled from a series of lectures in which she surgically dissects the basic tenets of Christianity. As one reads the chapters, one can follow the evolution of her ideas from Theism to Atheism, ending up with a stunning refutation of the Church of England Catechism. (Summary by Kevin Green)

Listen to Chapter 2 | A comparison between the fourth gospel and the three synoptics . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 2 | A comparison between the fourth gospel and the three synoptics and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 2 | A comparison between the fourth gospel and the three synoptics on the fly.
Chapter 1 | Preface by Wittgenstein | Free Audiobook The Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus is the only book published by Ludwig Wittgenstein. Any summary would frankly do the work an injustice - the interested reader is directed to Wittgenstein's preface and to the introduction of Wittgenstein's teacher, Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) - upon these no author could measurably improve. - (Summary by Landon D. C. Elkind)

Listen to Chapter 1 | Preface by Wittgenstein . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 1 | Preface by Wittgenstein and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 1 | Preface by Wittgenstein on the fly.
Chapter 10 | Lecture 10 part 1 - Conversion - Concluded | Free Audiobook The Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature is a book by the Harvard psychologist and philosopher William James that comprises his edited Gifford Lectures on "Natural Theology" delivered at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland between 1901 and 1902. These lectures concerned the nature of religion and the neglect of science, in James' view, in the academic study of religion. Soon after its publication, the book found its way into the canon of psychology and philosophy, and has remained in print for over a century. (Summary by Wikipedia)Lectures read by JoeD, preface read by musil.

Listen to Chapter 10 | Lecture 10 part 1 - Conversion - Concluded . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 10 | Lecture 10 part 1 - Conversion - Concluded and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 10 | Lecture 10 part 1 - Conversion - Concluded on the fly.
Chapter 8 | 08 - Essay 8: Beauty | Free Audiobook This is the best of Emerson's later works, qualifying his earlier popular essays, series one and two, with the heavier hand of experience. The Conduct of Life ostensibly is a set of essays about how to live life, but also is an amalgam of what life taught Emerson. (Summary by Daniel Christopher June)

Listen to Chapter 8 | 08 - Essay 8: Beauty . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 8 | 08 - Essay 8: Beauty and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 8 | 08 - Essay 8: Beauty on the fly.
Chapter 41 | 4-06-Part IV, Propositions 21 to 25 | Free Audiobook The Ethics is a philosophical book written by Baruch Spinoza. It was written in Latin. Although it was published posthumously in 1677, it is his most famous work, and is considered his magnum opus.In The Ethics, Spinoza attempts to demonstrate a "fully cohesive philosophical system that strives to provide a coherent picture of reality and to comprehend the meaning of an ethical life. Following a logical step-by-step format, it defines in turn the nature of God, the mind, human bondage to the emotions, and the power of understanding -- moving from a consideration of the eternal, to speculate upon humanity's place in the natural order, freedom, and the path to attainable happiness."(Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 41 | 4-06-Part IV, Propositions 21 to 25 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 41 | 4-06-Part IV, Propositions 21 to 25 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 41 | 4-06-Part IV, Propositions 21 to 25 on the fly.
Chapter 18 | 2-09-Part II, Propositions 36 to 40 | Free Audiobook The Ethics is a philosophical book written by Baruch Spinoza. It was written in Latin. Although it was published posthumously in 1677, it is his most famous work, and is considered his magnum opus.In The Ethics, Spinoza attempts to demonstrate a "fully cohesive philosophical system that strives to provide a coherent picture of reality and to comprehend the meaning of an ethical life. Following a logical step-by-step format, it defines in turn the nature of God, the mind, human bondage to the emotions, and the power of understanding -- moving from a consideration of the eternal, to speculate upon humanity's place in the natural order, freedom, and the path to attainable happiness."(Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 18 | 2-09-Part II, Propositions 36 to 40 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 18 | 2-09-Part II, Propositions 36 to 40 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 18 | 2-09-Part II, Propositions 36 to 40 on the fly.
Chapter 31 | 3-11-Part III, Propositions 46 to 50 | Free Audiobook The Ethics is a philosophical book written by Baruch Spinoza. It was written in Latin. Although it was published posthumously in 1677, it is his most famous work, and is considered his magnum opus.In The Ethics, Spinoza attempts to demonstrate a "fully cohesive philosophical system that strives to provide a coherent picture of reality and to comprehend the meaning of an ethical life. Following a logical step-by-step format, it defines in turn the nature of God, the mind, human bondage to the emotions, and the power of understanding -- moving from a consideration of the eternal, to speculate upon humanity's place in the natural order, freedom, and the path to attainable happiness."(Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 31 | 3-11-Part III, Propositions 46 to 50 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 31 | 3-11-Part III, Propositions 46 to 50 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 31 | 3-11-Part III, Propositions 46 to 50 on the fly.
Chapter 62 | 5-10-Part V, Propositions 41 to 42 | Free Audiobook The Ethics is a philosophical book written by Baruch Spinoza. It was written in Latin. Although it was published posthumously in 1677, it is his most famous work, and is considered his magnum opus.In The Ethics, Spinoza attempts to demonstrate a "fully cohesive philosophical system that strives to provide a coherent picture of reality and to comprehend the meaning of an ethical life. Following a logical step-by-step format, it defines in turn the nature of God, the mind, human bondage to the emotions, and the power of understanding -- moving from a consideration of the eternal, to speculate upon humanity's place in the natural order, freedom, and the path to attainable happiness."(Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 62 | 5-10-Part V, Propositions 41 to 42 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 62 | 5-10-Part V, Propositions 41 to 42 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 62 | 5-10-Part V, Propositions 41 to 42 on the fly.
Chapter 17 | 03 - Chapitre 9 | Free Audiobook « Cet ouvrage a pour objet les lois, les coutumes et les divers usages de tous les peuples de la terre. On peut dire que le sujet est immense, puisqu'il embrasse toutes les institutions qui sont reçues parmi les hommes ; puisque l'auteur distingue ces institutions ; qu'il examine celles qui conviennent le plus à la société et à chaque société ; qu'il en cherche l'origine ; qu'il en découvre les causes physiques et morales ; qu'il examine celles qui ont un degré de bonté par elles-mêmes et celles qui n'en ont aucun; que de deux pratiques pernicieuses, il cherche celle qui l'est le plus et celle qui l'est le moins ; qu'il y discute celles qui peuvent avoir de bons effets à un certain égard, et de mauvais dans un autre. Il a cru ses recherches utiles, parce que le bon sens consiste beaucoup à connaître les nuances des choses. » (Résumé par Montesquieu)

Listen to Chapter 17 | 03 - Chapitre 9 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 17 | 03 - Chapitre 9 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 17 | 03 - Chapitre 9 on the fly.
Chapter 2 | Tao as a Moral Principle, or 'Virtue' | Free Audiobook Lao-Tzu, also known as Laozi was a Chinese philosopher believed to have lived in the 6th century BCE and is credited with writing the Tao-Te-Ching which centers around the idea that the way of virtue lies in simplicity and a recognition of a natural, universal force known as the Tao. He is traditionally regarded as the founder of Taoism. This book is a compilation of his most profound writings translated directly from ancient Chinese texts. - Summary by Nemo

Listen to Chapter 2 | Tao as a Moral Principle, or 'Virtue' . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 2 | Tao as a Moral Principle, or 'Virtue' and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 2 | Tao as a Moral Principle, or 'Virtue' on the fly.
Book XXI: Chapters 7-14 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book XXI: Chapters 7-14. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book XXI: Chapters 7-14 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book XXI: Chapters 7-14 on the fly.
Chapter 6C-b - Dissemblance Phänomenologie des Geistes (1807) is Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's most important and widely discussed philosophical work. Hegel's first book, it describes the three-stage dialectical life of Spirit. The title can be translated as either The Phenomenology of Spirit or The Phenomenology of Mind, because the German word Geist has both meanings. Phenomenology was the basis of Hegel's later philosophy and marked a significant development in German idealism after Kant. Focusing on topics in metaphysics, epistemology, physics, ethics, history, religion, perception, consciousness, and political philosophy, The Phenomenology is where Hegel develops his concepts of dialectic (including the Master-slave dialectic), absolute idealism, ethical life, and Aufhebung. The book had a profound effect in Western philosophy, and "has been praised and blamed for the development of existentialism, communism, fascism, death of God theology, and historicist nihilism."

Note, this is the second volume of two.
(Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 6C-b - Dissemblance. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 6C-b - Dissemblance and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 6C-b - Dissemblance on the fly.
Chapter 6 | 06 - Book VI | Free Audiobook The work consists of ten books, originally separate scrolls, and is understood to be based on notes said to be from his lectures at the Lyceum which were either edited by or dedicated to Aristotle's son, Nicomachus. In many ways this work parallels the similar Eudemian Ethics, which has only eight books, and the two works can be fruitfully compared. Books V, VI, and VII of the Nicomachean Ethics are identical to Books IV, V, and VI of the Eudemian Ethics. Opinions about the relationship between the two works, for example which was written first, and which originally contained the three common books, is divided. Aristotle describes his ethical work as being different from his other kinds of study, because it is not just for the sake of contemplating what things are, but rather to actually become good ourselves. It is therefore practical rather than theoretical in the original Aristotelian senses of these terms. (Summary from Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 6 | 06 - Book VI . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 6 | 06 - Book VI and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 6 | 06 - Book VI on the fly.
Chapter 8 | The Problem of the Prosperous | Free Audiobook Dole briefly sketches the history of life, and shows how it has a definite direction - toward the survival of the kind and gentle people. It's a challenging, and quite persuasive argument, and also a much needed one in light of the dog-eat-dog theories out there. Dole shows that in our evolving society, our traditional understanding of "survival of the fittest" needs to be updated. A book that was way ahead of its time, yet so suited to it. Some may argue that - since he was writing The Coming People before the first two world wars - that he was obviously wrong. However, his argument remains valid given current scientific evidence cited in such books as "Evolution and Empathy", and "The Age of Empathy", and it's noteworthy that he wrote another book after World War I (see, A Religion for the New Day, 1920, where he states that while society is still quite barbaric, he retains his powerful conviction that it "is improving and improvable". ). Also, Dole points to the many flaws of his time (and ours too), and stresses the need to fix them in a peaceful, intelligent manner. Many of the issues he grappled with remain just as strong today, and he stated that it might be such. "The Coming People" is a universal, important message, and will continue to find home in the hearts of agnostics, believers, and atheists (at least for its strong social argument). (Introduction by Max Cusimano)

Listen to Chapter 8 | The Problem of the Prosperous . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 8 | The Problem of the Prosperous and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 8 | The Problem of the Prosperous on the fly.
Chapter 3 | Lesson III. The Development of the Reasoning Power | Free Audiobook One of three seminal philosophical works by the twelfth century Japanese Shogun, Yoritomo-Tashi. (From the Preface) He knows how to clothe his teachings in fable and appealing legend, and his exotic soul, so near and yet so far, reminds one of a flower, whose familiar aspect is transmuted into rare perfume.
By him the sternest questions are stripped of their hostile aspects and present themselves in the alluring form of the simplest allegories of striking poetic intensity.
When reading his works, one recalls unconsciously the orations of the ancient philosophers, delivered in those dazzling gardens, luxuriant in sunlight and fragrant with flowers.
In this far-away past, one sees also the silhouette of a majestic figure, whose school of philosophy became a religion, which interested the world because it spoke both of love and goodness.
But in spite of this fact, the doctrines of Yoritomo are of an imaginative type. His kingdom belongs to this world, and his theories seek less the joys of the hereafter than of that tangible happiness which is found in the realization of the manly virtues and in that effort to create perfect harmony from which flows perfect peace.
He takes us by the hand, in order to lead us to the center of that Eden of Knowledge where we have already discovered the art of persuasion, and that art, most difficult of all to acquire—the mastery of timidity.
Following him, we shall penetrate once more this Eden, that we may study with Yoritomo the manner of acquiring this art—somewhat unattractive perhaps but essentially primordial—called Common Sense. - Summary by B. Dangennes.

Listen to Chapter 3 | Lesson III. The Development of the Reasoning Power . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 3 | Lesson III. The Development of the Reasoning Power and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 3 | Lesson III. The Development of the Reasoning Power on the fly.
Chapter 05 Disproportionately remembered as a hellfire-and-brimstone Puritan preacher on the basis of the excessively-anthologized "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God," Jonathan Edwards was a noted philosopher in the field of Aesthetics, or the metaphysics of Beauty. An examination even of his sermons reveals constant references to this philosophical preoccupation, his favorite word in many passages seeming to be "Sweetness," by which term he intended to convey a rich sense of Beauty. In "A Dissertation Concerning the Nature of True Virtue," he explores the inseparable connection between Beauty and Truth, basing his deepest conviction of the Truth of Christianity on its inherent Beauty, Harmony, and Sweetness. - Summary by Expatriate

Listen to Chapter 05. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 05 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 05 on the fly.
Chapter 8 | Philosophy during the Tragic Age of the Greeks, Part 2 | Free Audiobook The essays contained in this volume treat of various subjects. With the exception of perhaps one we must consider all these papers as fragments. Written during the early Seventies, and intended mostly as prefaces, they are extremely interesting, since traces of Nietzsche's later tenets — like Slave and Master morality, the Superman — can be found everywhere. But they are also very valuable on account of the young philosopher's daring and able handling of difficult and abstruse subjects. "Truth and Falsity," and "The Greek Woman" are probably the two essays which will prove most attractive to the average reader. - from the Preface.

Listen to Chapter 8 | Philosophy during the Tragic Age of the Greeks, Part 2 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 8 | Philosophy during the Tragic Age of the Greeks, Part 2 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 8 | Philosophy during the Tragic Age of the Greeks, Part 2 on the fly.
Section 12, Chapter 15 This book provides the basics of Theosophy and perhaps the beginning of a life long journey. Theosophy comes from the ancient wisdom that man and nature are as inseparable from the universe as the universe is inseparable from man and nature. It is a science and a philosophy, not a religion which depends on (dogma) faith. Knowledge gained through the study of Theosophy comes from the understanding of natural laws and harmony of the universe. Rogers shows us why we cannot separate ourselves from God (universe); the evolution of the soul; rebirth after physical death; why we don’t remember past lives and much more. If you’ve ever questioned why we are here or what happens when we die, the study of Theosophy may provide answers. (Summary by kirk202)

Listen to Section 12, Chapter 15. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Section 12, Chapter 15 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Section 12, Chapter 15 on the fly.
Chapter 34 | Of ideas of identity and diversity Part II | Free Audiobook John Locke's essays on human understanding answers the question “What gives rise to ideas in our minds?”. In the first book Locke refutes the notion of innate ideas and argues against a number of propositions that rationalists offer as universally accepted truth. In the second book Locke elaborates the role played by sensation, reflection, perception and retention in giving rise to simple ideas. Then he elaborates on how different modes, substances and relations of simple ideas (of the same kind) give rise to complex ideas v.g. space, time, infinity etc. Finally he discusses complex ideas of mixed modes which arise from a combination of simple ideas of different kinds v.g. identity and diversity, cause and effect, etc. (Summary by bala) Prooflistening for this project was done by bala and Rapunzelina

Listen to Chapter 34 | Of ideas of identity and diversity Part II . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 34 | Of ideas of identity and diversity Part II and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 34 | Of ideas of identity and diversity Part II on the fly.
Chapter 40 | Of the association of ideas | Free Audiobook John Locke's essays on human understanding answers the question “What gives rise to ideas in our minds?”. In the first book Locke refutes the notion of innate ideas and argues against a number of propositions that rationalists offer as universally accepted truth. In the second book Locke elaborates the role played by sensation, reflection, perception and retention in giving rise to simple ideas. Then he elaborates on how different modes, substances and relations of simple ideas (of the same kind) give rise to complex ideas v.g. space, time, infinity etc. Finally he discusses complex ideas of mixed modes which arise from a combination of simple ideas of different kinds v.g. identity and diversity, cause and effect, etc. (Summary by bala) Prooflistening for this project was done by bala and Rapunzelina

Listen to Chapter 40 | Of the association of ideas . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 40 | Of the association of ideas and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 40 | Of the association of ideas on the fly.
Chapter 18 | XIV. The Logic of Judgements of Practice - Sense Perception as Knowledge | Free Audiobook In this early collection of formative essays, acclaimed American philosopher John Dewey argues that the idealistic, realistic, and analytic schools of philosophy fail to take into account the pragmatic and experimental nature of experience - common to science and practical experience, but alien to the abstract theorizing of coherentist and correspondence theories of logic.

Here we find the essential groundwork for the mature naturalistic and process-oriented metaphysics that Dewey would elaborate in his later mature works such as Experience and Nature and Logic: The Theory of Inquiry.

In his long introduction, Dewey provides a summary and precis of his experimental logic, taking specifically pains to contrast his approach with the emerging analytic logic of Russell and Frege.

Chapters 3-6 take aim at the idealistic logic dominant in his time by providing a close reading and critique of the German logician Hermann Lotze.

Chapters 7-8 argue for the distinction between acquaintance with an external reality and knowledge of that reality.

Rather than disembodied and abstract, Dewey describes a logic arising out of the concrete interactions of organisms embedded within a natural environment. Dewey's logic of experience is essential to an understanding of his various projects, from education, to art, politics, pragmatism, and science.

(Summary by P. J. Taylor)

Listen to Chapter 18 | XIV. The Logic of Judgements of Practice - Sense Perception as Knowledge . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 18 | XIV. The Logic of Judgements of Practice - Sense Perception as Knowledge and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 18 | XIV. The Logic of Judgements of Practice - Sense Perception as Knowledge on the fly.
Chapter 19 | XIV. The Logic of Judgements of Practice - Science as a Practical Art | Free Audiobook In this early collection of formative essays, acclaimed American philosopher John Dewey argues that the idealistic, realistic, and analytic schools of philosophy fail to take into account the pragmatic and experimental nature of experience - common to science and practical experience, but alien to the abstract theorizing of coherentist and correspondence theories of logic.

Here we find the essential groundwork for the mature naturalistic and process-oriented metaphysics that Dewey would elaborate in his later mature works such as Experience and Nature and Logic: The Theory of Inquiry.

In his long introduction, Dewey provides a summary and precis of his experimental logic, taking specifically pains to contrast his approach with the emerging analytic logic of Russell and Frege.

Chapters 3-6 take aim at the idealistic logic dominant in his time by providing a close reading and critique of the German logician Hermann Lotze.

Chapters 7-8 argue for the distinction between acquaintance with an external reality and knowledge of that reality.

Rather than disembodied and abstract, Dewey describes a logic arising out of the concrete interactions of organisms embedded within a natural environment. Dewey's logic of experience is essential to an understanding of his various projects, from education, to art, politics, pragmatism, and science.

(Summary by P. J. Taylor)

Listen to Chapter 19 | XIV. The Logic of Judgements of Practice - Science as a Practical Art . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 19 | XIV. The Logic of Judgements of Practice - Science as a Practical Art and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 19 | XIV. The Logic of Judgements of Practice - Science as a Practical Art on the fly.
Chapter 0 | Preface | Free Audiobook This anthology collects a number of fascinating strands of Bertrand Russell's thought. "Mathematics and the Metaphysicians" details the impact of the 1900 World Congress of Philosophers on Russell's development and the hope that new methods in mathematics could be applied to the solution of ancient philosophical problems. Many of the subsequent essays show the evolution of this hope as Russell worked on the foundations of mathematics and applied the new methods to the reconstruction of physical objects on the basis of sense-data, and the redefinition of matter and cause. (Landon D. C. Elkind)

Listen to Chapter 0 | Preface . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 0 | Preface and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 0 | Preface on the fly.
Chapter 6B(I)a - The World of Spirit in Self-estrangement - Culture and its Sphere of Objective Reality (part 1) Phänomenologie des Geistes (1807) is Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's most important and widely discussed philosophical work. Hegel's first book, it describes the three-stage dialectical life of Spirit. The title can be translated as either The Phenomenology of Spirit or The Phenomenology of Mind, because the German word Geist has both meanings. Phenomenology was the basis of Hegel's later philosophy and marked a significant development in German idealism after Kant. Focusing on topics in metaphysics, epistemology, physics, ethics, history, religion, perception, consciousness, and political philosophy, The Phenomenology is where Hegel develops his concepts of dialectic (including the Master-slave dialectic), absolute idealism, ethical life, and Aufhebung. The book had a profound effect in Western philosophy, and "has been praised and blamed for the development of existentialism, communism, fascism, death of God theology, and historicist nihilism."

Note, this is the second volume of two.
(Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 6B(I)a - The World of Spirit in Self-estrangement - Culture and its Sphere of Objective Reality (part 1). Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 6B(I)a - The World of Spirit in Self-estrangement - Culture and its Sphere of Objective Reality (part 1) and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 6B(I)a - The World of Spirit in Self-estrangement - Culture and its Sphere of Objective Reality (part 1) on the fly.
Chapter 7B-b - The Living Work of Art Phänomenologie des Geistes (1807) is Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel's most important and widely discussed philosophical work. Hegel's first book, it describes the three-stage dialectical life of Spirit. The title can be translated as either The Phenomenology of Spirit or The Phenomenology of Mind, because the German word Geist has both meanings. Phenomenology was the basis of Hegel's later philosophy and marked a significant development in German idealism after Kant. Focusing on topics in metaphysics, epistemology, physics, ethics, history, religion, perception, consciousness, and political philosophy, The Phenomenology is where Hegel develops his concepts of dialectic (including the Master-slave dialectic), absolute idealism, ethical life, and Aufhebung. The book had a profound effect in Western philosophy, and "has been praised and blamed for the development of existentialism, communism, fascism, death of God theology, and historicist nihilism."

Note, this is the second volume of two.
(Wikipedia)

Listen to Chapter 7B-b - The Living Work of Art. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 7B-b - The Living Work of Art and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 7B-b - The Living Work of Art on the fly.
Chapter 8 | Mechanism and Life | Free Audiobook This history of Western philosophy, published in 1920, explores the ways mankind has explained the natural world during the last few centuries, whether by spiritual interpretation or through advances in science. From the Preface: "The chapters which follow are not intended as even a slight sketch of the history of Thought since the Renaissance. Their object is more modest, i.e. to illustrate the thesis that mankind, being 'incurably religious,' insists (however hopeless the enterprise may sometimes seem) upon interpreting the universe spiritually." (Summary by LA Walden and the Preface)

Listen to Chapter 8 | Mechanism and Life . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 8 | Mechanism and Life and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 8 | Mechanism and Life on the fly.
Chapter 11 | Some Recent Tendencies in Philosophy | Free Audiobook This history of Western philosophy, published in 1920, explores the ways mankind has explained the natural world during the last few centuries, whether by spiritual interpretation or through advances in science. From the Preface: "The chapters which follow are not intended as even a slight sketch of the history of Thought since the Renaissance. Their object is more modest, i.e. to illustrate the thesis that mankind, being 'incurably religious,' insists (however hopeless the enterprise may sometimes seem) upon interpreting the universe spiritually." (Summary by LA Walden and the Preface)

Listen to Chapter 11 | Some Recent Tendencies in Philosophy . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 11 | Some Recent Tendencies in Philosophy and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 11 | Some Recent Tendencies in Philosophy on the fly.
Chapter 7 | Part II: Of the Principles of Material Things XIV-XXV | Free Audiobook The Principles of Philosophy, originally published in Latin in 1644, and translated to French in 1647, sets forth the principles of nature--the Laws of Physics--as Descartes viewed them. The book provides a systematic statement of natural philosophy and metaphysics, and represents the first truly comprehensive, mechanistic account of the universe.

The Selections from the Principles of Philosophy contains the whole of the first part of the book ("Of the Principles of Human Knowledge"), as well as selections from the second ("Of the Principles of Material Things"), third ("Of the Visible World"), and fourth part ("Of the Earth") of the book. (Foon)

Listen to Chapter 7 | Part II: Of the Principles of Material Things XIV-XXV . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 7 | Part II: Of the Principles of Material Things XIV-XXV and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 7 | Part II: Of the Principles of Material Things XIV-XXV on the fly.
Chapter 18 | The Eighth Lesson, The Highlands And Lowlands Of Mind. Part 1 | Free Audiobook The Book talks on the internal world of the self. The real nature of the subconscious mind, the way to control it, how ego comes into play and most frequently asked questions like "Who am I" are attempted to answer. (Summary by Uday Sagar)Note: William Walker Atkinson wrote this book using the pseudonym Yogi Ramacharaka.

Listen to Chapter 18 | The Eighth Lesson, The Highlands And Lowlands Of Mind. Part 1 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 18 | The Eighth Lesson, The Highlands And Lowlands Of Mind. Part 1 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 18 | The Eighth Lesson, The Highlands And Lowlands Of Mind. Part 1 on the fly.
Chapter 3 | Part 3 (Sections 81-120) | Free Audiobook The She-rab Dong-bu (Tree of Wisdom) is a metrical translation in Tibetan of a Sanscrit ethical work entitled Prajnya Danda, written by Nagarjuna who flourished in the fourth century of the Buddhist era (about 100 B.C.), The Tibetan version was probably made about the 11th century of our era but the exact date has not been determined. It is included in the Ten-gyur, ངོ་ section, volume གོ་, beginning at leaf 165. The Tibetan translator describes it as the second volume but I cannot say whether the remainder of the work has been preserved in Tibetan--the Sanscrit original is apparently lost. - W.L. Campbell

Listen to Chapter 3 | Part 3 (Sections 81-120) . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 3 | Part 3 (Sections 81-120) and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 3 | Part 3 (Sections 81-120) on the fly.
Chapter 26 | 26 - Part VI: Section II | Free Audiobook "How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortunes of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it, except the pleasure of seeing it." (from The Theory of Moral Sentiments)
note: This is the First edition, the 6th edition was revised and extra material added.

Listen to Chapter 26 | 26 - Part VI: Section II . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 26 | 26 - Part VI: Section II and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 26 | 26 - Part VI: Section II on the fly.
Chapter 1 | Book 1 Sections 01-11 (Text 8) | Free Audiobook Tusculan Disputations (Latin: TUSCULANARUM DISPUTATIONUM) is divided into five books which discuss death, pain, grief, perturbations and virtue. At issue is whether wise people can always be happy regardless of the apparent evil that fortune throws in their way. Andrew Peabody says the A. and M. in the text may stand for Auditor, Adolescens, Atticus or Aulus and Marcus or Magister. Written by Marcus Tullius Cicero. Translated by Charles Duke Yonge. (Summary by Geoffrey Edwards)

Listen to Chapter 1 | Book 1 Sections 01-11 (Text 8) . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 1 | Book 1 Sections 01-11 (Text 8) and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 1 | Book 1 Sections 01-11 (Text 8) on the fly.
Chapter 3 | Second Alcibiades (Vol.4 Pg.375) | Free Audiobook It is not generally agreed whether Plato was the author of any of these books.
I. Hippias Major (or Greater Hippias)
II. Second Alcibiades (or On Praying)
III. Theages
IV. The Rivals (or Rival Lovers)
V. Hipparchus
VI. Minos
VII. Clitopho (or Clitophon)
VIII. The Epistles (13 Letters)
IX. Epinomis (or The Philosopher)
X. Axiochus (or On Death)
XI. On Virtue
XII. On Justice
XIII. Sisyphus (or Upon Taking Counsel)
XIV. Demodocus
XV. Definitions
XVI. Timaeus Locrus (or The Treatise of Timaeus the Locrian, On the Soul of the World and Nature)- Summary by Geoffrey Edwards

Listen to Chapter 3 | Second Alcibiades (Vol.4 Pg.375) . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 3 | Second Alcibiades (Vol.4 Pg.375) and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 3 | Second Alcibiades (Vol.4 Pg.375) on the fly.
Chapter 1 | Ancient Religions, Part 1 | Free Audiobook The first of 14 volumes, this book discusses ancient civilization looking primarily at religion and philosophy. Summary by KHand

Listen to Chapter 1 | Ancient Religions, Part 1 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 1 | Ancient Religions, Part 1 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 1 | Ancient Religions, Part 1 on the fly.
Chapter 16 | Literary Genius, Part 1 | Free Audiobook The first of 14 volumes, this book discusses ancient civilization looking primarily at religion and philosophy. Summary by KHand

Listen to Chapter 16 | Literary Genius, Part 1 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 16 | Literary Genius, Part 1 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 16 | Literary Genius, Part 1 on the fly.
Chapter 2 | Second Adhyaya | Free Audiobook The word Upanishad (upa-ni-shad) consists of, "Upa" means "near;" "ni" means "down;" "shad" means "to sit." Thus, Upanishad is to sit down near the teacher to discuss, learn, practice, and experience. There are some 200 or more Upanishads. Some are lost and are only known about because of being referenced in other Upanishads. Most of the Upanishads were kept secret for centuries, only passed on to others orally in the form of Shlokas (a category of verse line developed from the Vedic Anustubh meter).The Bṛhadāraṇyaka Upanishad (Sanskrit: बृहदारण्यक उपनिषद्) is one of the oldest, mukhya (primary) Upanishads. It is contained within the Shatapatha Brahmana (Brahmana is a collection of ancient Indian texts with commentaries on the Vedas.), which is itself a part of Shukla Yajur Veda. Brihad means great. Aryanka (Snskrit) आरण्यक means means pertaining to the forest. Aranyaka in the Upanishadic context refers to a treatise to be read or expounded by anchorites in the quiet of the forest. Shankara in his commentary on Bṛhadāraṇyaka said that it was “composed for the sake of those who wish to liberate themselves from the world, in order that they may acquire the knowledge that the Absolute Brahman and the individual are the same...A knowledge by which the liberation from the cause of the world is accomplished.” Brihadaranyaka Upanishad is estimated to have been composed about 700 BCE.The 11 principal Upanishads to which Sankara appeals in his great commentary on the Vedanta-Surtras are: Chandogya, Talavakara or Kena, Aitareya, Kaushitaki, Vajasaneyi or Isha, Katha, Mundaka, Taittirtiyaka or Taittiriya, Brihadaranyaka, Svetasvatara, and Prasna. They are also called the 11 classical Upanishads or the fundamental Upanishads of the Vedanta Philosophy. Apart from these, Maitrayana-Brahmana-Upanishad is also considered as an important Upanishad. The Upanishadic literature is not a religious scripture and is free from dogma and doctrines. It is not a part of any religion but is a philosophy for all times and for all. German philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer, impressed by the Upanishads, called the texts "the production of the highest human wisdom". Summary by Jothi.

Listen to Chapter 2 | Second Adhyaya . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 2 | Second Adhyaya and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 2 | Second Adhyaya on the fly.
Book VI: Chapters 7-12 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book VI: Chapters 7-12. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book VI: Chapters 7-12 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book VI: Chapters 7-12 on the fly.
Book XVII: Chapters 9-16 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book XVII: Chapters 9-16. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book XVII: Chapters 9-16 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book XVII: Chapters 9-16 on the fly.
Book XVII: Chapters 17-24 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book XVII: Chapters 17-24. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book XVII: Chapters 17-24 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book XVII: Chapters 17-24 on the fly.
Book XVIII: Chapters 48-54 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book XVIII: Chapters 48-54. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book XVIII: Chapters 48-54 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book XVIII: Chapters 48-54 on the fly.
Book XXI: Chapters 1-6 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book XXI: Chapters 1-6. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book XXI: Chapters 1-6 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book XXI: Chapters 1-6 on the fly.
Book XXI: Chapters 25-27 Rome having been stormed and sacked by the Goths under Alaric their king, the worshippers of false gods, or pagans, as we commonly call them, made an attempt to attribute this calamity to the Christian religion, and began to blaspheme the true God with even more than their wonted bitterness and acerbity. It was this which kindled my zeal for the house of God, and prompted me to undertake the defence of the city of God against the charges and misrepresentations of its assailants. This work was in my hands for several years, owing to the interruptions occasioned by many other affairs which had a prior claim on my attention, and which I could not defer.
However, this great undertaking was at last completed in twenty-two books. Of these, the first five refute those who fancy that the polytheistic worship is necessary in order to secure worldly prosperity, and that all these overwhelming calamities have befallen us in consequence of its prohibition. In the following five books I address myself to those who admit that such calamities have at all times attended, and will at all times attend, the human race, and that they constantly recur in forms more or less disastrous, varying only in the scenes, occasions, and persons on whom they light, but, while admitting this, maintain that the worship of the gods is advantageous for the life to come. In these ten books, then, I refute these two opinions, which are as groundless as they are antagonistic to the Christian religion.
But that no one might have occasion to say, that though I had refuted the tenets of other men, I had omitted to establish my own, I devote to this object the second part of this work, which comprises twelve books, although I have not scrupled, as occasion offered, either to advance my own opinions in the first ten books, or to demolish the arguments of my opponents in the last twelve. Of these twelve books, the first four contain an account of the origin of these two cities—the city of God, and the city of the world. The second four treat of their history or progress; the third and last four, of their deserved destinies. And so, though all these twenty-two books refer to both cities, yet I have named them after the better city, and called them The City of God. (Summary by the author in his Retractationes (ii. 43) as translated by Marcus Dods)

Listen to Book XXI: Chapters 25-27. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Book XXI: Chapters 25-27 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Book XXI: Chapters 25-27 on the fly.
Chapter 8 | Propositions 140 to 159 | Free Audiobook The Elements of Theology (ΣΤΟΙΧΕΙΩΣΙΣ ΘΕΟΛΟΓΙΚΗ) was written by the Greek Neoplatonist philosopher Proclus (ΠΡΟΚΛΟΣ) and translated by Thomas Taylor who named his youngest son Thomas Proclus Taylor. This book consists of 211 propositions, each followed by a proof, beginning from the existence of the One (divine Unity) and ending with the descent of individual souls into the material world. Saint Thomas Aquinas recognized that the Liber de Causis (Book of Causes), which had been attributed to Aristotle, was actually a summary of the Elements of Theology, likely written by an Arabic interpreter. - Summary adapted from Wikipedia by Geoffrey Edwards

Listen to Chapter 8 | Propositions 140 to 159 . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 8 | Propositions 140 to 159 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 8 | Propositions 140 to 159 on the fly.
06 - Book VII Chapters 6-11 Eudemian Ethics (Greek: ΗΘΙΚΩΝ ΕΥΔΗΜΙΩΝ Latin: ETHICA EUDEMIA) discusses topics including virtue, friendship, happiness and God. It is believed to have been written before Nicomachean Ethics and to be named after Eudemus of Rhodes. Books IV, V, and VI of Eudemian Ethics are identical to books V, VI, and VII of Nicomachean Ethics and are excluded from this translation. (Summary by Geoffrey Edwards)

Listen to 06 - Book VII Chapters 6-11. Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from 06 - Book VII Chapters 6-11 and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save 06 - Book VII Chapters 6-11 on the fly.
Chapter 8 | Aphorisms 176 - 181 Appendix A & B ( Appendix B is The Hymn of Cleanthes ) | Free Audiobook Aphorisms from the Stoic Greek.

Listen to Chapter 8 | Aphorisms 176 - 181 Appendix A & B ( Appendix B is The Hymn of Cleanthes ) . Make snippets of your favorite quotes and moments from Chapter 8 | Aphorisms 176 - 181 Appendix A & B ( Appendix B is The Hymn of Cleanthes ) and organize them with all your favorite classic book quotes in a playlist. When you make a playlist, you can include your favorite chapters or snippets so you can share or listen to them any time. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Chapter 8 | Aphorisms 176 - 181 Appendix A & B ( Appendix B is The Hymn of Cleanthes ) on the fly.
Load More