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North American History

All Audio
Updated On: Nov 04, 2023
Total Stations: 32
Total Audio Titles: 2,363

Popular “North American History” Stations

Witness to Yesterday (The Champlain Society Podcast on Canadian History) Immerse yourself in Canada’s history! Witness to …
Cool Canadian History Historian David Borys dives deep into the fascinating world of Canadian history in this bi-weekly podcast exploring everything from the wonderful to the weird to the downright dark. Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Cool Canadian History The wild, wacky, weird, wonderful and downright dark stories in Canadian history told in no particular order.
I have activated listener support, and have a Patreon as well, for those wishing to support this project! Support this podcast: ht” id-for-player=”3GptIauFvc5″ id=”old-history-appalachian-history-podcast” link=”/station/old-history-appalachian-history-podcast/” vid=”5DaqtF2Nl7D” csrf=”HlpHyDVfZg98r7JW1Z3ACi46YnmwFDbVV7joPni2bdCnR7a9sD21UoMm33WDgtc2″ verification-image=”https://image1.vurbl.com/vurbl/vms-13-1-11-d305a35/img/veri.svg” entity-type=”station” is-authorized=”false” position=”vertical”>
Old History- Appalachian History Podcast It is the prime intention of this Podcast channel to discuss major, and minor happenings throughout history in the Southern US, with other important happenings as well!
I have activated listener support, and have a Patreon as well, for those wishing to support this project! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/oldhistory/support
Garbled Twistory: A US History Podcast told through elections! Garbled Twistory is a podcast that’s primary objective is to humanize history, through humorizing history. It re-tells history in a way that places special emphasis on the most unusual elements and indiscriminately injects F.U.N by the bucketload!

The first season’s focus is US History: as told by all of its presidential elections and all of its presidential election candidates! There will be biographical episodes for every presidential candidate, episodes for every election, and episodes for the years in between them! Get Excited!

Expect a new episode to pop up here every Sunday! You can listen on iTunes, Stitcher, many a place! We also have a Facebook Page!
Today in Canadian History Each episode of Today in Canadian History contains an interview with a Canadian professor, journalist, author, or “everyday” historian and focuses on a unique event or moment that took place on that day in Canadian history. Today in Canadian History presents Canada’s past in a unique and accessible manner. The series is designed to be a first step to learning more about our past. We would like to remind Canadians not just about what makes our country great, but what makes it complicated, beautiful, diverse, and ours. Feel free to get in touch with Marc & Joe via-email: [email protected]
U.S. History – VOA Learning English U.S. History explains the history of the United States. Each report tells how the country and its people have developed.
Memorize US History Learn what's happening around the United States with the news, politics, and economy.
‎Nikolas Fotopoulos' U.S. History Podcast My awesome podcast called Making YOU Smarter!

Popular “North American History” Playlists

All “North American History” Audio

When Turtle Mountain Moved: The Frank Slide On April 29, 1903 at 4:10 a.m., 30 million cubic metres, equaling 110 million tonnes, of limestone rock fell off Turtle Mountain onto the community of Frank, Alberta. It killed upwards of 100 people, and is still the deadliest landslide in Canadian history.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Ottawa's Gangs Of New York Era: The Shiners War For a few years in the 1830s, Ottawa was a very different place. Called Bytown at the time, it was more a Gangs of New York type of place, rather than a future capital of Canada. During the reign of terror of the Shiners, no one was safe from violence.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Canada's Battlefield Surgeon: Dr. Norman Bethune Part of a prominent Canadian family, Dr. Norman Bethune revolutionized battlefield medicine while helping the wounded during the Spanish Civil War. He then went to China, where he helped bring modern medicine to the rural areas. Celebrated in China, he was ignored for decades in Canada.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Code Talker Secrecy of Charles Tomkins Charles Tomkins grew up speaking Cree and English. That bilingual skill would aid him in his life when he helped translate Allied secret messages to and from Cree. Sworn to a secret oath, he kept that secret for half a century.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

People, Politics and Purpose presents ” id=”2ZURrJIYLF9″ vid=”2ZURrJIYLF9″ id-for-player=”2ZURrJIYLF9″ link=”/listen/critical-reflection-of-individual-lives-biography-and-canada-2ZURrJIYLF9/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Critical Reflection of Individual Lives: Biography and Canada In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon speaks with P. Whitney Lackenbauer about his book People, Politics, and Purpose: Biography and Canadian Political History published by University of British Columbia Press in 2023 and co-edited by the late Greg Donaghy.

People, Politics and Purpose presents a collection of micro-biographies on key figures—including lumberjacks, prime ministers, and Indigenous leaders—to reflect on Canada’s political history. These rich histories of individual lives have been compiled by the contributors of this collection to address broad historical questions while presenting critical reflections on the dynamics of Canadian politics and society. Further, this illustrative collection provides insights into Canada’s place in the world and stimulates fresh thinking about political history.

P. Whitney Lackenbauer is a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in the Study of the Canadian North and a Professor in the School for the Study of Canada and the Department of History at Trent University. Whitney specializes in Arctic security, sovereignty and governance issues, modern Canadian military and diplomatic history, and Indigenous-state relations.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.
Image Credit: Gar Lunney/Library and Archives Canada/PA-188614

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E15 Columbus Who? The Norse in Newfoundland The legendary sagas of the Vikings have always spoken of perilous, seaborne adventures to lands so far to the west as to literally drop off the edge of the known European universe. While some of these lands eventually became known as Iceland and Greenland, other parts would later be dubbed the “New World.” Yet, the discovery of the “New World” was attributed to Christopher Columbus. For centuries, legends persisted that Norse explorers came to the new world long before Columbus. In fact, rumours had it that the Norse made it well into the interior of the North American continent. For a long time, it was difficult for most archeologists and historians to prove if this was ever true. That was until 1968. That year two archeologists discovered a small cloak pin of Norse design in a location on the northern tip of the island of Newfoundland in the province of Newfoundland-Labrador. This discovery triggered a massive archeological dig that would eventually come to prove that over one thousand years ago, and nearly 500 years before Christopher Columbus’ infamous arrival in the West Indies, Vikings indeed arrived in what would become known as the “New World.” Book recommendation: In Search of First Contact: the Vikings of Vinland, the Peoples of the Dawnland, and the Anglo-American Anxiety of Discovery by Annette Kolodny, Duke University Press, 2012. https://www.dukeupress.edu/in-search-of-first-contactTwitter – https://twitter.com/DocBorys Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/curiouscanadianhistory Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

In his book, Miller addresses an” id=”9NIqAov096i” vid=”9NIqAov096i” id-for-player=”9NIqAov096i” link=”/listen/unlearning-distorted-views-of-history-residential-schools-and-reconciliation-9NIqAov096i/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Unlearning Distorted Views of History: Residential Schools and Reconciliation In this podcast episode, Nicole O’Byrne speaks with award-winning author Jim R. Miller about his book Residential Schools and Reconciliation: Canada Confronts its History published by University of Toronto Press originally in 2017 and reprinted in paperback in 2022.

In his book, Miller addresses and explains the institutional responses to Canada’s residential school legacy. Providing an analysis of archival material and interviews with former students, politicians, bureaucrats, church officials, and the Chief Commissioner of the TRC, Miller reveals a major obstacle to achieving reconciliation – the inability of Canadians at large to overcome their flawed, overly positive understanding of their country’s history. This provocative work asks Canadians to accept that the root of the problem was Canadians like them in the past who acquiesced to aggressively assimilative policies.
Jim Miller is a professor emeritus of history and a former Canada Research chair and native newcomer. Relations at the University of Saskatchewan. He is the author of numerous works on issues related to Indigenous peoples including Skyscrapers Hide the Heavens and Shingwauk’s Vision. Miller authored the first ever accounts of Canada's residential school system and shaped public understanding of issues including treaty rights. He is an officer of the Order of Canada, a winner of the SSHRC Gold Medal for Achievement and Research, and winner of the 2014 Killam Prize in the Humanities.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
The Empress of Ireland When the Empress of Ireland sunk beneath the waves of the St. Lawrence River in 1914, the disaster killed nearly as many people as the Titanic. Not as well-known, but just as tragic, “Canada’s Titanic” shook lives and the country to its core. Today in Penny Sized History, I take a quick look at the ship, the disaster and the people it impacted.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Frank Slide On April 29, 1903 at 4:10 a.m., 30 million cubic metres, equaling 110 million tonnes, of limestone rock fell off Turtle Mountain onto the community of Frank, Alberta. It killed upwards of 100 people, and is still the deadliest landslide in Canadian history.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Shiners War For a few years in the 1830s, Ottawa was a very different place. Called Bytown at the time, it was more a Gangs of New York type of place, rather than a future capital of Canada. During the reign of terror of the Shiners, no one was safe from violence.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S8E14 Strange Tales from Toronto Every city, town and village in this country has its own unique history. For this episode, CCH takes a deep dive into some strange tales from the great city of Toronto. From a brawl between clowns and firefighters, to a bizarre post-mortem request from one of Canada's most important political figures and finally to a strange contest that saw the birth rate of the city spike. Guiding us through these tales is historian Adam Bunch. Adam is the author of the Toronto Book of the Dead and The Toronto Book of Love, host of the Canadiana documentary series on YouTube, and the creator of the Toronto History Weekly newsletter. He is also one of the organisers of the Festival of Bizarre Toronto History, a festival dedicatedto exploring strange stories from the city's past. This festival is a busy weekfilled with online lectures, panels, interviews, and walking tours featuringsome of Toronto's greatest storytellers. The festival runs from April 3 to 9and tickets are now on sale and can be purchased via the website bizarretoronto.com. Twitter – https://twitter.com/DocBorys Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/curiouscanadianhistory Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The book explores the history of liquor regulation in Ontario in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Malleck” id=”3cIAdm5JrKF” vid=”3cIAdm5JrKF” id-for-player=”3cIAdm5JrKF” link=”/listen/the-drink-question-the-political-history-of-liquor-regulation-in-canada-3cIAdm5JrKF/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
The Drink Question: The political history of liquor regulation in Canada In this podcast episode, Simon Nantais speaks with Dan Malleck about his book, Liquor and the Liberal State: Drink and Order before Prohibition published by UBC Press in 2022.
The book explores the history of liquor regulation in Ontario in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Malleck discusses how notions of individual freedom, equality, and property rights were debated, challenged, and modified in response to an active prohibitionist movement and equally active liquor industry. This book helps to demonstrate the challenges governments faced when dealing with alcoholic beverages, particularly within the conceptual framework of liberalism.
Dan Malleck is a professor in the Department of Health Sciences at Brock University and the director of Brock’s Centre for Canadian Studies. He was the editor-in-chief of the journal Social History of Alcohol and Drugs. He is a medical historian specializing in drug and alcohol regulation and policy. His books include Try to Control Yourself: The regulation of public drinking in post-prohibition Ontario and When Good Drugs go Bad: Opium, medicine, and the origins of Canada’s drug laws. He is also the co-editor, with Cheryl Warsh, of Pleasure and Panic: New Essays on the history of alcohol and drugs and the editor of the four-volume primary source collection Drugs, Alcohol, and Addiction in the Long Nineteenth Century. He contributes to current discussions on cannabis legalization, the opioid crisis, liquor laws, and drinking policy using historically grounded analysis to provide insight into current issues.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
Unequal Communities: The Waywayseecappo Indian Reserve and the Town of Rossburn In this podcast episode, Nicole O’Byrne speaks with Andrew Stobo Sniderman and Douglas Sanderson about their book, Valley of the Birdtail: An Indian Reserve, a White Town, and the Road to Reconciliation published by HarperCollins Canada in 2022. Valley of the Birdtail was awarded the OLA Evergreen award in 2023.
The book weaves together the multi-generational stories of Indigenous and non-Indigenous families to depict a larger picture of Canada’s history. Looking to the town of Rossburn and the Waywayseecappo Indian reserve, the authors showcase the different realities of the people living in these communities, particularly the inequality of education and the long-lasting effects of residential schools. Intricately researched, Valley of the Birdtail incorporates legal histories, political analyses, and the personal histories to reflect on the relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians and ends with a hopeful look to the future.
Andrew Adobo Sniderman is a writer, lawyer, and Rhodes Scholar from Montreal. He has written for the New York Times, the Globe and Mail, and Maclean’s. His profile of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Residential Schools won the award for best print feature of 2011 from the Canadian Association of Journalists. He has also argued before the Supreme Court of Canada, served as the human rights policy advisor to the Canadian minister of foreign affairs, and worked for a judge of South Africa’s Constitutional Court.
Douglas Sanderson (Amo Binashii) is the Prichard Wilson Chair in Law and Public Policy at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He has served as a senior policy advisor to Ontario’s attorney general and minister of Indigenous affairs. Sanderson's research areas include Aboriginal and indigenous legal theory, as well as private legal theory. His work uses the lens of material culture and property theory to examine the nature of historic injustice to indigenous peoples and possible avenues for redress. He is Swampy Cree, Beaver clan, of the Opaskwayak Cree Nation.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
Madeleine Parent For her entire adult life, Madeleine Parent fought for workers right in Quebec and elsewhere in Canada. For her efforts, she was jailed, put on trial and vilified in the press. She never gave up, and changed Canada forever.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Battleford Hangings After the Frog Lake Massacre and the North West Resistance, eight Indigenous men were arrested and put on trial. The trial was a foregone conclusion, and all were put to death outside Battleford in 1885. It was the largest mass hanging in Canadian history.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
On the Ground: A History of Tactical, Operational, and Strategic Canadian Military Intelligence In this podcast episode, Larry Ostola speaks to David Charters about his book, Canadian Military Intelligence: Operations and Evolution From the October Crisis To the War In Afghanistan published by Georgetown University Press in 2022. In this book, Charters explores recent Canadian military history, focusing on how tactical, operational, and strategic intelligence impacted Canadian military operations. Using interviews and other documents, he discusses events of the October crisis, the Gulf War, peacekeeping missions in the Balkans, and the war in Afghanistan and demonstrates how military intelligence became a central feature of Canada’s military history. This book offers insight and critical implications for future intelligence support.
David Charters is a retired professor of history and is a senior fellow of the Milton F. Gregg Centre at the University of New Brunswick. He is the author of a number of publications on the study of intelligence services and activities.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E13 The Little Island That Could: PEI and Confederation Prince Edward Island is one of the most beautiful provinces in Canada. It’s wind-swept beaches are stunning, it’s people are some of the friendliest in the country. It has beautiful golf courses, scenic terrain, a provincial proclivity for incredible music, inspired by both Celtic and French roots. It is the setting for Anne of Green Gables. It has a deep, almost magical connection to the waters that surround it, and if you can catch the perfect day, at the perfect hour, it feels like a small piece of heaven. Today we are talking about one of the most interesting stories regarding Prince Edward Island…the story of how it came to join Canada. Despite the first of the confederation conferences occurring in Charlottetown, the island was not originally part of the Dominion of Canada when first formed in 1867. Why did it not join in then? What happened to make it join in 1873? These questions and more are answered today by Christopher Dummitt. Christopher is a Canadian historian at Trent University, author of Unbuttoned: A History of Mackenzie King’s Secret Life, and host of the podcast 1867 and All That.Book recommendations: Unbuttoned: A History of Mackenzie King’s Secret Lifehttps://www.mqup.ca/unbuttoned-products-9780773548763.php Twitter – https://twitter.com/DocBorys Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/curiouscanadianhistory Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Becoming Canadian: Exploring Birth-based Citizenship In this podcast episode, Simon Nantais speaks with Lois Harder about her book, Canadian Club: Birthright, Citizenship and National Belonging published by the University of Toronto Press in 2022. Harder explores how Canadians confronted situations in which the certainty of birthright citizenship turned out to be less secure and less unassailable than generally presumed. She particularly looks at the years from 1940s to the present and the development of the Citizenship Act of 1947. The book references court cases and media stories, and highlights “Lost Canadians,” people who discovered they had no legal right to claim their birthright. Harder ends the book with alternative approaches to forming political communities and looks towards a more just and democratic alternative to birth-based citizenship.
Professor Lois Harder is a political scientist and the current Dean of Social Sciences at the University of Victoria. Her research interests include citizenship law, social policy, and family law.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
The Doukhobors The Doukhobors came to Canada at the turn of the 20th century, and were welcomed with open arms by Canadians. However, as time went on, their communal living, pacifism and commitment to hard work led to Canadians viewing them with suspicion. Things were not helped when the Sons of Freedom came along.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Mythical Voyage of Henry Sinclair Three centuries after the Vikings and a century before Cabot, did a man by the name of Henry Sinclair land in Nova Scotia? The evidence is sketchy but the story is interesting, so let's take a look at Henry Sinclair and his apparent voyage across the ocean blue to Nova Scotia in 1398.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Interfering with Indigenous Law: Settler Colonial Invasion and Land Theft In this podcast episode, Nicole O’Byrne speaks to Daniel Rück about his award-winning book, The Laws and the Land: The Settler Colonial Invasion of Kahnawà:ke in Nineteenth-Century Canada published by the University of British Columbia Press for the Osgoode Society Canadian Legal History in 2021. Based on his doctoral dissertation, Rück’s work is a history of the relationship between Kahnawà:ke and Canada and the interference of settler law on Indigenous law. By focusing on land use rights, Rück reveals the ways in which the settler nation conflicted with Indigenous laws and governance of Kahnawà:ke. He further details the tactics of the colonizers in expanding the settler state. The book also investigates larger issues such as legal pluralism, historical racism, inequality, and human relations with the environment.
Daniel Rück is an assistant professor at the University of Ottawa in Department of History and the Institute of Indigenous Research and Studies. He is a settler scholar living and working on the unceded territory of the Algonquin nation along the Kitchissippi (also known as the Ottawa River).

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.
Image credit: Library and Archives Canada

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E12 Montreal's Black Renaissance The history of Montreal’s Black community goes as far back as the very first French explorers to settle along the St. Larry River valley. The community has dealt with slavery, oppression, injustice, and both informal and formal racism. Yet, it is a community that has not only endured, it has thrived, despite significant challenges. It is also a community that was very much connected to the emerging civil rights movement in the US, and it is a community that embraced its own struggle, though a struggle that was very much unique to the geopolitical situation of Quebec in the post-Second World War period. While the community was certainly active in fighting for equality no affair highlighted galvanized it more than the Sir George Williams Affair in January 1969, an event that some argue, set off one Montreal’s Black renaissance. Book recommendation: Unsettling the Great White North: Black Canadian History by Funke Aladejebi and Michele Johnson. Univ. of Toronto Press, 2022 https://utorontopress.com/9781487529178/unsettling-the-great-white-north/ Twitter – https://twitter.com/DocBorys Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/curiouscanadianhistory Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The National Film Board From the day it was formed, for the next eight decades and counting, the National Film Board of Canada has brought pride to Canada through its Oscar nominations and wins, the movies and vignettes that capture Canadiana, and the documentaries that preserve our history.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Cascadia Earthquake It was an earthquake that shook 1,000 kilometres of land, registered 9 on the Richter Scale and sent a 10-foot-high tsunami towards Japan on Jan. 26, 1700. Today, I am looking at the giant earthquake that rocked British Columbia in the evening of that day, reshaping the land and cementing itself in stories of the Indigenous people who live there. Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Disaffected Loyalists and Passionate Patriots: Feelings in the Enlightenment Atlantic In this podcast episode, Nicole O’Byrne speaks to Keith S. Grant about his book, Enthusiasms and Loyalties: The Public History of Private Feelings in the Enlightenment Atlantic published by McGill-Queen’s University Press in 2022. Grant examines the emotions of the communities in Atlantic Canada during the Enlightenment as they grappled with the turnout of the War of 1812, the Loyalist settlement in Nova Scotia, the American Revolution, and other turbulent events of the time. He refers to the journals and other public writings of key historical figures to reveal the deep feelings expressed during the time. From angry mobs to homesick immigrants, passionate patriots to disaffected loyalists, Grant explores how these “private” emotions shaped the public events of the era.
Keith S. Grant is an associate professor at Crandall University, a Christian liberal arts university located in Moncton, New Brunswick. He has a PhD from the Department of History at the University of New Brunswick. Keith has won several prestigious research scholarships for his work, and he is a founding co-editor of the website Borealia: Early Canadian History.

Image credit: Library and Archives Canada, Acc. No. R9266-393 Peter Winkworth Collection of Canadiana

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
The Kidnapping Of John Labatt In August 1934, the head of Labatt, John Labatt, was driving to the office from his cottage. He suddenly found himself a victim of kidnapping and the entire country fell into a media storm for three days as everyone wondered who had John Labatt and how would it all end.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Mystery of Bill Barilko Every Canadian knows the song about him, and the myth surrounding him, but who was Bill Barilko? Where did the man who scored the winning goal for Toronto in the Stanley Cup Final grow up, how did he die and how did they search for him when he went missing? Today, I dive into the history behind the man who became a legend thanks to a Tragically Hip song. Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something?Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Origin of Income Tax: War and the History of Canadian Income Tax In this podcast episode, Nicole O’Byrne speaks to Colin Campbell about his co-authored book with Robert Raizenne, A History of Canadian Income Tax, Volume One, 1917 to 1948 published by the Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History and the Canadian Tax Foundation in 2022. It is the first installment in a three-volume series on the history of Canadian Income Tax and focuses on the periods of World War I and World War II and the relationship between income tax and the war efforts. The book describes the origins of income tax and its development during the interwar period and its place during World War II.
Colin Campbell is an associate professor of law at Western University. He has an MSc from the London School of Economics and Political Science and a PhD from the University of Toronto. He earned his law degree at Western University. He practiced as a tax partner at Davies in Toronto. His practice included tax planning, and he has also represented taxpayers before the Tax Court. He has written extensively on both tax planning and tax administration, but he has a particular interest in tax history.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.
Image credit: Canada. Dept. of Interior / Library and Archives Canada / PA-043768

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E11 Clara Ford and the Parkdale Murder that Excited a Nation In the autumnal darkness of October 6, 1894, an unseen figure slipped through the streets of Parkdale, rang the doorbell at the home of a well-to-do Toronto family, and shot Frank Westwood in his doorway, murdering him in cold blood. Six weeks later, the spotlight shone on the enigmatic Clara Ford, a Black tailor and single mother known for her impeccable work ethic and resolute personality – and for wearing men’s attire. A former neighbour of the Westwoods, Clara was arrested and confessed to the murder. But as the details of her arrest and her complex connection to the Westwood family emerged, she recanted, testifying that she was coerced by police into a false confession. Clara was the first woman – and only the second person – to testify on her own behalf in a Canadian trial. On this episode I chat with Dr. Carolyn Whitzman whose recent book Clara at the Door with a Revolver explores the incredible story of Clara FordBook recommendation: Clara at the Door with a Revolver: The Scandalous Black Suspect, the Exemplary White Son and the Murder That Shocked Toronto (UBC Press, 2023) https://www.ubcpress.ca/clara-at-the-door-with-a-revolver Twitter – https://twitter.com/DocBorys Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/curiouscanadianhistory Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The Gretzky Trade Aug. 9, 1988 is a day that will live in infamy in Edmonton and Canada, but the day Wayne Gretzky was traded was a day that forever changed the NHL and hockey in Canada. How did such a trade happen, and what was the end result?Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something? Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Joint Arctic Weather Stations: A collaborative program between Canada and the United States In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon speaks to P. Whitney Lackenbauer about his book, The Joint Arctic Weather Stations: Science and Sovereignty in the High Arctic, 1946-1972. The book is co-authored with Daniel Heidt. This history is a fascinating look at the Joint Arctic Weather Station (JAWS) initiative, and its five locations in Alert, Eureka, Resolute, Isachsen, and Mould Bay. Lackenbauer describes their creation, the Canada-US relations involved in the program, and the impact of the stations. He further looks at the roles of civilians and leaders in the functioning of the stations and the challenges that arose during this period. He concludes by elaborating on the reasons why JAWS was shut down and its lasting legacy.
Whitney Lackenbauer is a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in the Study of the Canadian North and a Professor in the School for the Study of Canada and the Department of History at Trent University. He is one of Canada’s foremost experts on both Arctic history and contemporary issues concerning Arctic security and international relations in the region.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.
Image credit: Wilfred Doucette / National Film Board of Canada / Library and Archives Canada / PA-142404

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
The Story of a National Crime, Episode Four **This is a bonus episode provided by Knockabout Media, rather than Canadian History Ehx**He became the Chief Medical Health Officer of Ontario. He wrote the very first Health Code in Ontario. He was president of the American Public Health Association. He was a North American expert on public health. Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce wanted to become Canada's first public health officer. When an opening came up at Indian Affairs, he decided it would be a good stepping stone.In this series, we look at the practices, policies, and official correspondence to reveal the intentional actions and acts of indifference that contributed to poor health and lethal outcomes. There will be examples of people who pushed back – the whistleblowers – the parents, the Indigenous communities, the bureaucrats, and members of the clergy. The experts interviewed highlight how archival documents only reveal part of the history and that numerous questions remain.Content Warning: This series talks about Indian Residential Schools, medical racism, segregated health care, and missing patients.If you are a Residential School Survivor or Intergenerational Survivor, you can access support through the National Indian Residential School Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419. Mental health and crisis support is also available through Hope 4 Wellness at 1-855-242-3310.Credits:Written/Produced by Maia-Foster SanchezCo-Producer: Ryan BarnettAdditional Voices: Gabriel MaracleOur series advisors are Teresa Edwards, Kaila Johnston, and Erin Millions.Artwork by Caleb Ellison-DysartA Knockabout Media Production | Funded by the Government of Canada Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
North of 60 In 1992, a show unlike any other debuted on CBC, and for the next five years it changed Canadian television forever. North of 60 continues to be popular to this day for its emphasis on Indigenous representation and issues. Its impact is also felt to this day in the many Indigenous television shows that now exist.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something? Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Henrietta Edwards Decades before her fellow members of the Famous Five began their women's rights work, Henrietta Edwards was setting up organizations and helping women gain a voice. A complex figure, she fought for the rights of women throughout her life, culminating in the historic Persons Case.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehxWant to send me something? Craig BairdPO Box 2384Stony Plain PO Main, AlbertaT7Z1X8 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
A Canadian Coup: The Dramatic History of Canada’s Accidental Prime Minister, Mackenzie Bowell In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon speaks to Ted Glenn about his book A Very Canadian Coup: The Rise and Demise of Prime Minister Mackenzie Bowell, 1894-1896. Glenn provides a detailed and intriguing account of a little-known period of Canadian history, the life and times of Canada’s fifth Prime Minister, Mackenzie Bowell. Initially intended to be a “caretaker” Prime Minister, the Manitoba schools question changed Bowell’s role in history. Ultimately, this political crisis led to Bowell’s quiet removal as the leader of the Conservative Party. Though Bowell was initially well-liked, Glenn delves into the tumultuous political proceedings which led to the Conservative Party removing their support, instead backing Sir Charles Tupper, and Bowell’s consequent resignation.
Ted Glenn is a professor and Program Coordinator of Public Administration at Humber College. Specializing in public sector training and governance, he has been an advisor to various Canadian governments for over 20 years.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.
Image credit: William James Topley / Library and Archives Canada / PA-025662

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E10 – Our Man in Toronto: Sam Carr and a Soviet Spy Ring in Canada In the Autumn of 1945 a Soviet cipher clerk defected to Canada instead of returning home to the Soviet Union. The information he brought with him shocked officials. It named a certain Sam Carr, a Toronto resident and labour activist, as a key figure in not only helping to establish a spy ring, but being the mastermind behind it all! Book recommendations: Amy Knight How the Cold War Began: The Gouzenko Affair and the Hunt for Soviet Spies 2005 by Mclelland and Stewart; https://www.amazon.com/How-Cold-War-Began-Gouzenko/dp/0771095775Tyler Wentzell Not for King and Country; Edward Cecil-Smith, the Communist Party, and the Spanish Civil War2020 by UTP https://utorontopress.com/9781487522889/not-for-king-or-country/David Levy Stalin’s Man in Canada: Fred Rose and Soviet Espionage 2011 by Enigma Bookshttps://www.amazon.ca/Stalins-Man-Canada-Soviet-Espionage/dp/1936274272 Twitter – https://twitter.com/DocBorys Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/curiouscanadianhistory Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
National Security Measures and Political Trials: Canadian State Trials of 1939-1990 In this podcast episode, Nicole O’Byrne speaks to Barry Wright about his book Canadian State Trials, Volume V: World War, Cold War, and Challenges to Sovereignty, 1939–1990, co-edited with Susan Binnie and Eric Tucker. The book was published for the Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History by the University of Toronto Press in 2022. It is the final installment in a five-volume series on the history of Canadian State Trials and focuses on the political trials and national security measures of 1939 to 1990. Topics covered in this collection of essays include the internment of Japanese Canadians during and after WWII, labour strikes, and Indigenous protests, particularly in British Columbia. Canadian State Trials, Volume V is a diverse collection of work of legal scholars, historians, and interdisciplinary scholars.
Barry Wright is Professor Emeritus of law, criminology, and history at Carleton University. He has done extensive research on political trials, the administration of national security measures in Canadian history and on the rule of law and criminal law reform in the 19th century British Empire. He has co-edited all five volumes in the Canadian State Trial series.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.
Image credit: A.Y. Jackson and the Origins of the Group of Seven

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
Charlotte Small David Thompson is my favourite Canadian historical figure, but there is another person who is part of his story and played a major role in his success; his wife…Charlotte Small. Together, the couple were married for 58 years, having 11 children, several of whom were born and raised while exploring. She is a fascinating person, and much more than a footnote in the story of Thompson.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Historical Massacre and Re-Establishment of Bison in the Great Plains In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon speaks to Wes Olson about his book The Ecological Buffalo: On the Trail of a Keystone Species. The Ecological Buffalo is co-authored by Johane Janelle, Olson’s wife, and includes a beautiful collection of photographs by Janelle. The book is an in-depth history of the bison based on their combined experiences and years of studying and photographing bison in Alberta. Olson explores how North America’s largest land mammal, the bison, is a keystone species in the Great Plains ecosystem, and examines the historical extermination of the bison in the colonization of Canada. His focus is on ecological preservation and re-establishment of bison and other endangered Canadian species, and he highlights the impact to Indigenous people when this chain is disrupted. Wes Olson was a warden in the Canadian National Park System for over 30 years. He grew up in the foothills of western Alberta and currently lives on an acreage of forest and beaver ponds beside Elk Island National Park in central Alberta.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E9 The Trent Affair and the Defence of British North America At midday on November 8th 1861 the USS San Jacinto stopped and boarded the British mail steamer, RMS Trent. A party of American marines then boarded the British vessel and removed from it two Confederate diplomats on their way to Europe to court British and French support for the Confederate cause in the recently erupted American Civil War. This event sparked a massive diplomatic crisis and brought London and Washington the nearest to war they had been since 1812 and frankly, the nearest to war they would ever be again. With the two nations so close to conflict, all of a sudden the dilapidated defences of Britain’s North American colonies were made plain for all to see and a flurry of activity was instigated in London to quickly bolster the seemingly undefended British North American colonies before an American invasion came. Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Confederation to World War I: A History of Law in Canada In this podcast episode, Nicole O’Byrne speaks to Jim Phillips about A History of Law in Canada, Volume Two: Law for a New Dominion, 1867–1914, a book he co-authored with Philip Gerrard and Blake Brown. This is the second volume in an ambitious three-volume series on the history of law in Canada. He explores the history of law in Canada through the period spanning from Confederation to the start of World War I, using guiding themes such as property rights, criminal law, labour and employment, women and minority rights, Indigenous-State relations, federalism, and the building of the nation and its legal systems. Jim Phillips is one of Canada's most respected and influential legal historians. He is a Professor at the University of Toronto's Law Faculty History Department and Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies. He previously served as a law clerk to Madame Justice Bertha Wilson at the Supreme Court of Canada. Phillips teaches and has written about property and trust law as well as Canadian legal history. Among his other numerous works, he has co-edited four volumes in the Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History series of essays on the history of Canadian law.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
Canada's Space History From our first satellite in the early 1960s, to our role in the moon landing to the iconic Canadarm, Canada has helped drive the Space Age and achieved many notable accomplishments along the way.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Battle of Hudson Bay It was the largest Arctic naval battle in North American history, and it was fought on the shores of Hudson Bay hundreds of years ago. This battle is little-known, little-remembered but still very important when it comes to the history of Canada and the fur trade.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The 1885 Montreal Smallpox Epidemic In the spring of 1885, a railway worker came into Montreal feeling ill. By September, the city was known as the centre of a smallpox epidemic. Efforts to limit the spread of the disease were met with anger and, eventually, a deadly riot. Thousands died in what would become the last major smallpox epidemic in a North American city in history.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sgt. Gander This episode is dedicated to my departed Newfoundland pup Boris, who would have been 11 on Dec. 31, 2022.Sgt. Gander was a Newfoundland dog beloved by the members of his regiment. During the Battle of Hong Kong, this "Black Devil" as the Japanese called him, saved the lives of several of his comrades and earned his place in history.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Ipirvik and Taqulittuq Growing up in Cumberland Sound, with whalers nearby, Ipirvik and Taqulittuq had a foot in two worlds. Their own of the Inuit, and the other of Western Civilization. With their unique skills and perspective, they saved many lives in the Arctic and helped expeditions accomplish their goals.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Due South Running from 1994 to 1999, Due South became an iconic show on Canadian television and a hit around the world. Taking the stereotypical Mountie and partnering him with the stereotypical American detective created comedy gold that had millions of Canadians watching.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S8E8 I've Seen it, I've Done It – the Life of Paul Anka Before there was Justin Bieber, Britney Spears, New Kids on the Block, or the Osmonds, there was Paul Anka. One of Canada’s most important contributors to the landscape of modern pop music. While not the first teen star, he was the first one from Canada and defied the odds by leaving Ottawa for New York to make it big, and make it big he did. His career has spanned decades, his success has been global, his work is iconic, and while today younger listeners might now know much about him, his influence on music and music history is undeniable. HAPPY HOLIDAYS EVERYONE!!! CCH will return in January of 2023 🙂 BOOK RECO: My Way written by Paul Anka and David Dalton published in 2013 by St. Martin’s Presshttps://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250044495/my-way Twitter – https://twitter.com/DocBorys Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/curiouscanadianhistory Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The Story of a National Crime, Episode Three He became the Chief Medical Health Officer of Ontario. He wrote the very first Health Code in Ontario. He was president of the American Public Health Association. He was a North American expert on public health. Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce wanted to become Canada's first public health officer. When an opening came up at Indian Affairs, he decided it would be a good stepping stone.In this series, we look at the practices, policies, and official correspondence to reveal the intentional actions and acts of indifference that contributed to poor health and lethal outcomes. There will be examples of people who pushed back – the whistleblowers – the parents, the Indigenous communities, the bureaucrats, and members of the clergy. The experts interviewed highlight how archival documents only reveal part of the history and that numerous questions remain.Content Warning: This series talks about Indian Residential Schools, medical racism, segregated health care, and missing patients.If you are a Residential School Survivor or Intergenerational Survivor, you can access support through the National Indian Residential School Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419. Mental health and crisis support is also available through Hope 4 Wellness at 1-855-242-3310.Credits:Written/Produced by Maia-Foster SanchezCo-Producer: Ryan BarnettAdditional Voices: Gabriel MaracleOur series advisors are Teresa Edwards, Kaila Johnston, and Erin Millions.Artwork by Caleb Ellison-DysartA Knockabout Media Production | Funded by the Government of Canada Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Hudson Bay, Fur Trade: French-Indigenous Relations in New France In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon to Scott Berthelette about his book Heirs of an Ambivalent Empire: French-Indigenous Relations and the Rise of the Métis in the Hudson Bay Watershed. The book is based on Bethelette’s PhD dissertation which he completed at the University of Saskatchewan in 2020. He explores how relationships and family ties were involved in the relations between sovereign Indigenous nations and the French colonial government of the 17th and 18th century. His focus is on the fur trade and the relationships between the French-Canadian (Canadien) men who traded with Indigenous trappers and hunters. Scott Berthelette is an Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Queen’s University. His research focuses on the history of Indigenous Peoples with a focus on the Métis and their relations with New France and the English through Hudson’s Bay Company. He is also a member of the Manitoba Métis Federation.

Image credit: Hudson Bay Exploration Western Interior map by Alexrk2

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
The SS Atlantic In 1873, the company that became famous for its "unsinkable" ship The Titanic, had another terrible disaster. A lack of planning and experience resulted in one of the worst maritime disasters that Canada has ever seen.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Brush, Floss, and Smile: A history of dental care, oral health, and social inequality In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Catherine Carstairs about her newest book The Smile Gap: A History of Oral Health and Social Inequality. Carstairs presents the first cultural and social history of oral health in Canada and explores the ways in which society places high value on good teeth. For those Canadians without access to good, or any, dental care, there is a gap as they struggle with their general physical health and their self-image. Consequently, people without an “attractive smile” may be at a disadvantage professionally and socially. Carstairs further elaborates on the history of dental care, examining the improvements in the field over the past 100 years, in particular the use of fluoride, the focus on children’s dental care, and the rise of cosmetic dentistry. Catherine Carstairs is Professor of History at the University of Guelph, where she specializes in the history of health and medicine, as well as gender history.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E7 The Last Duel….in Canada If you took a stroll along the banks of Tay River, in Perth Ontario, just on the northeast edge of the town, you would come upon on a strangely named location, Last Duel Park. Certainly, for many, they might just walk on by, chalking it up to just a strangely named location. But the more curious might wonder, how did this park get its name? The name is not a clever one, it’s given to the park because that is the location of the last fatal duel ever fought in Canada. In 1833 two former friends had such a falling out that the only recourse they sought was a pistol duel on a June summer evening. While on the surface it seemed like this dispute was over a betrayal of trust, behind the scenes it seems like there was far more going on, that being a devious plot to secure a love interest. A devious plot that if true horribly backfired and left one young man dead. Book recommendation: Susan Code A matter of honour: And other tales of early Perth, General Store Pub. House, January 1996https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/SearchResults?an=susan%20code&tn=matter%20honour%20tales%20early&sortby=17&cm_sp=plpafe-_-all-_-link Twitter – https://twitter.com/DocBorys Patreon – https://www.patreon.com/curiouscanadianhistory Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Chief Piapot The leader of a band of Cree in future Saskatchewan, Chief Piapot always put the welfare of his people first. He continually tried to establish a large reserve territory for the Cree, only to be hampered by the federal government every step of the way.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Wolf’s Howl: A social history of wolves in Canada In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Stephanie Rutherford about her newest book Villain, Vermin, Icon, Kin: Wolves and the Making of Canada. Rutherford explores human-wolf relations from the time of Canadian settlers to present day. She further investigates the emotions behind these relations – fear of wolves by early settlers to the disgust of wolves as savage animals. She continues by discussing the representation of the wolf in folktales and other media, as well as identifying times where the wolf is a romanticized figure. Rutherford finishes her book by suggesting we look to Indigenous teachings in their relationship with wolves and recommending we use empathy as a model for moving forward in human interactions with wolves, particularly as a way of facing the global biodiversity crisis. Stephanie Rutherford is an associate professor in the School of Environment at Trent University in Peterborough, Ontario. She describes her research as inhabiting the intersections among political ecology, animal studies, and bio politics.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
Expo 67 A landmark event in Canadian history, and the flagship event of the Canadian Centennial in 1967, Expo 67 is considered to be the most successful World's Fair of the 20th century.For six months, Canada opened its doors to the world and 50 million people showed up.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdMastadon: @[email protected]: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Tuzo: Scientist, Geologist, and Unlikely Revolutionary In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Nicholas Eyles about his biography of Jock Tuzo Wilson, one of Canada’s most important scientists of the twentieth century. Eyles describes Tuzo’s youth, his beginning as a geologist, his experiences during World War II, and his impact on the science of geology. This culminates with the revolution of plate tectonics, which significantly altered the way we think about the Earth. Nick Eyles is Professor of Geology at the University of Toronto Scarborough where he has taught for nearly forty years. In addition to his many scientific publications, he is the award-winning author of the popular “Rocks” series, including Ontario Rocks (2002), Canada Rocks (2007), and the Canadian Shield – The Rocks that Made Canada (2011). His edited book Georgian Bay: A Unique North American Ecosystem (2018) was awarded the Floyd S. Chalmers Medal by the Champlain Society.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E6 Henri Bourassa and the Conscription Crisis Henri Bourassa is one of the most famous Quebec journalists in the history of Canada. His writing at Le Devoir, the paper he founded, was embraced by many as the voice of French-Canadians struggling to assert their place in a rapidly changing Canadian nation. He was a complex man, a devout ultramontane Catholic, a French-Canadian nationalist, but also a man who saw a future where English and French Canadians could cooperate and live side by side in harmony as the two “races” of a strong and proud Canadian nation. Yet he was also deeply disturbed by Canada’s attachment to Britain and Britain’s empire, and time and time again his platform at Le Devoir became the voice of many in Quebec who bristled at this long-standing imperial connection. No event put Bourassa on the national stage like the First World War, while he was already quite well known in Quebec prior to 1914, by the end of that war he would be known from coast to coast. The book recommendation for this episode is Duty to Dissent: Henri Bourassa and the First World War by Geoff Keelan published by UBC Press in 2019. Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The House Hippo In the 1990s, a one-minute commercial ran on television. What no one could have expected was that the commercial, centering on a creature that didn't exist, would become beloved by a generation of Canadians and cement itself in Canadian culture forever.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
The Artist Soldier: A.Y. Jackson and the Origins of the Group of Seven In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Douglas Hunter, the author of Jackson's Wars: A.Y. Jackson, the Birth of the Group of Seven, and the Great War. In this book, two critical cultural aspects of Canadian history intertwine – the Group of Seven and the Great War. This biography provides a vivid and detailed account of the great Canadian painter A.Y. Jackson and the origins of the Group of Seven. Hunter illustrates Jackson’s childhood, beginnings as an artist, and the influence of the First World War on Jackson’s work and life. Hunter offers an in-depth story of a peak, and transformative, period of Jackson’s life that led to his evolution as an artist and the birth of the Group of Seven. Douglas Hunter is a non-fiction professional writer. He has a PhD in History (2015) from York University and is the author or co-author of at least twenty non-fiction books. He is also an artist and works as an illustrator and graphic designer.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.
Image credit: Mortimer Lamb/Library and Archives Canada

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
Canada And The Armistice On Nov. 11, 1918, Canada erupted in celebration when news spread that the First World War, or Great War as they called it, was over. Tens of thousands of Canadians had been killed or wounded, and the news of the war end was greeted with euphoria around the country.Artwork/logo design by Janet CordahiSupport: patreon.com/canadaehxMerch: www.canadaehx.com/shopDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Canada in the 1950s: A Political History In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Nelson Wiseman, the author of 1950s Canada: Politics and Public Affairs. With his book, Wiseman chronicles each year of this decade, providing details of the social, economic, political, and cultural developments that shaped the nation. The book looks to the changes in crime rates, life expectancy, and discrimination; the interplay between Canada and other countries as well as the relationship between Quebec and the rest of the nation; and the competitiveness of federal and provincial politics during the era. This history of the politics and public affairs of Canada in the 1950s provides a record of these significant events against a backdrop technological, political, and economic change. Nelson Wiseman is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Political Science at the University of Toronto. He is the author of a number of political histories including the evolution of Canadian political parties.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
The Beatles In Canada From 1964 to 1966, The Beatles played only a handful of shows in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal. Each show was pandemonium but the story of the Beatles in Canada goes far beyond that. From their first visit to Canada in Winnipeg, to the famous Bed-In in Montreal in 1969.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
S8E5 Stanley Thompson and Golf in Canada There are many ways in which Canadians express their national identity. Through song, poetry, tattoos, pride over historic and international achievements, the celebration of multi-culturalism, the singing of the anthem, voting in an election, and so many other expressions large and small help us define who we are and who we think we are as Canadians. Sport has always played a central role in this search for identity. From cheering for Team Canada at the Olympics, to fanatically following your local sports team, sport has always been a way to unite Canadians. But sport has also played a role in helping to express the Canadian experience, especially when that Canadian experience is one that embraces Canada’s rugged, hostile and beautiful environment. In the 1920s and onwards the famous painting cabal known as the Group of Seven created an international sensation by painting Canada’s landscapes, presenting to the world what has been considered Canada’s first true school of art. At the same time that these great painters were presenting their material to a world fascinated by Canada’s landscapes, Stanley Thompson was doing the same thing…with golf courses. Thompson embraced the Canadian terrain and built golf courses into it that celebrated the unique and rugged nature of the Canadian landscape. In many ways, Thompson too was an artist who was also, like the Group of Seven, celebrating the Canadian experience through expressions of nature.In this episode we chat with past guest Jordan Goldstein. Jordan has a Ph.D. in Sports History and 7+ years teaching sports philosophy, sociology, and history. He published his first book entitled "Canada's Holy Grail: Lord Stanley's Political Motivation to Donate the Stanley Cup" in 2021 through University of Toronto Press. His book investigates the political motivations of Lord Stanley's donation of the Stanley Cup as an act of Canadian nation building. ​He recently quit academia to build a coaching and consulting business, Phya Academy, and to work on curriculum development at Synthesis School. Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Bewitchment, Possession, and the Diabolical Arts: Daily Life in New France In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Mairi Cowan, the author of The Possession of Barbe Hallay: Diabolical Arts and Daily Life in Early Canada, a microhistory of bewitchment and demonic possession in New France. This account of the possession of Barbe Hallay serves as an example of the social and religious history in and around 17th-century Quebec. With these stories, Cowan illustrates the daily fears and anxieties of people of New France and details how this case of possession compares to others of the period. She provides a social and religious history that delves into beliefs about witchcraft, demonology, religion, Catholicism, power of the church, accepted social behaviours, and the overall precarious position of the colony during this era. Mairi Cowan is Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, at the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Toronto Mississauga with a cross appointment to the Institute for the Study of University Pedagogy. She is a historian of the late medieval and early modern world, with specializations in the social and religious histories of Scotland and New France. She is also an officer of the Champlain Society.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.
Photo credit: Kasia, flickr.com/photos/mysza/

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
The Story Of A National Crime: "A Condition Disgraceful to the Country" He became the Chief Medical Health Officer of Ontario. He wrote the very first Health Code in Ontario. He was president of the American Public Health Association. He was a North American expert on public health. Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce wanted to become Canada's first public health officer. When an opening came up at Indian Affairs, he decided it would be a good stepping stone.In this series, we look at the practices, policies, and official correspondence to reveal the intentional actions and acts of indifference that contributed to poor health and lethal outcomes. There will be examples of people who pushed back – the whistleblowers – the parents, the Indigenous communities, the bureaucrats, and members of the clergy. The experts interviewed highlight how archival documents only reveal part of the history and that numerous questions remain.Content Warning: This series talks about Indian Residential Schools, medical racism, segregated health care, and missing patients.If you are a Residential School Survivor or Intergenerational Survivor, you can access support through the National Indian Residential School Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419. Mental health and crisis support is also available through Hope 4 Wellness at 1-855-242-3310.Credits:Written/Produced by Maia-Foster SanchezCo-Producer: Ryan BarnettAdditional Voices: Gabriel MaracleOur series advisors are Teresa Edwards, Kaila Johnston, and Erin Millions.Artwork by Caleb Ellison-DysartA Knockabout Media Production | Funded by the Government of Canada
Expo 86 Canada's second World's Fair was held almost two decades after its first. While Expo 86 wouldn't be watershed moment in Canadian history that Expo 67 was, it would completely transform Vancouver into an international city. The question many have, is whether the transformation was for the good, or the bad.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Diefenbaker Revival: The Rise and Fall of the Diefenbaker Governments In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews John Courtney, the author of a new book on the history of the rise and fall of Canadian Prime Minister John Diefenbaker’s governments. Revival and Change: The 1957 and 1958 Diefenbaker Elections, published by UBC Press in December 2022, provides an interesting account of the elections as well as the path to Diefenbaker’s victories, including the challenges and characteristics that shaped it. It is a story of the influential and significant era in Canadian history and its legacy in Canadian politics. John Courtney is currently Senior Fellow in Residence at the Johnson Sciama Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Saskatchewan campus. He has written extensively on political institutions, Royal commissions and elections in Canada.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.
Photo credit: Louis Jacques. Library and Archives Canada, C-080883

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E4 A 17th Century River of Change – The Innu and the Algonquin along the St. Lawrence River The St. Lawrence River is one of the most important waterways in the western hemisphere. It has been home to a multitude of peoples and has provided both food and commerce for centuries. It is both a cornucopia and a highway. First Nations have lived along its banks for more than a millennium and when Europeans began arriving I the late 16th century they entered into a diverse and complicated world, patterns that had been shifting and evolving for centuries prior. Two of the main groups thriving in this world were the Algonquin and Innu, and they would see the possibilities that the newly arrived French could bring, but also were very aware of the destabilizing nature that came as a result of the European arrival. Book recommendation: Flesh Reborn: The Saint Lawrence Valley Mission Settlements Through the Seventeenth Century by Jean-Francois Lozier, published by McGill-Queen's University Press in 2018 Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
Pauline Johnson Born with Mohawk and English heritage, Pauline Johnson took that and turned it into a thriving poetry performing career. Through her poetry, she gave a voice to the Indigenous and women who lived in a time with few rights, and no voice of their own.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
1871: Wait, We're Still Stabbing the Whales? In this FINAL in-between-election episode covering 1871, literal forces of nature band together in the Arctic to put a nail on the coffin of a bloody industry!
No Booze and No Dogs: A History of Tourism in Prince Edward Island In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Alan MacEachern and Edward MacDonald, the co-authors of a new book on the history of tourism in Canada’s smallest province. The Summer Trade: A History of Tourism on Prince Edward Island was published by McGill=Queen’s University Press in 2022. This book covers the various stages in the history of tourism from its early beginnings in the late nineteenth century to its mass commercialization in the postwar era. The land of Anne of Green Gables has been a favourite destination for generations of visitors seeking peace in an idyllic and timeless setting. Alan MacEachern is a professor of history at the University of Western Ontario who has published widely on Canadian environmental history. He is joined by Edward MacDonald, a professor of history at the University of Prince Edward Island who has also written on environmental history.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
The Christie Pits Riot While Nazi Germany was on the rise in 1933, a baseball game between a Jewish team and an Italian team descends into a massive riot when members of the anti-sematic Pit Gang decide to unfurl their swastika banner. By the end of the day, 10,000 people will have taken to the streets, leaving dozens injured.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
Gord Downie He is considered to be one of Canada's greatest singer-songwriters, and his band The Tragically Hip are Canadian legends, but there is much more to the story of this amazing artist.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
1870: Hoaxes Galore!! It's our second in-between-election episode of the series, and oh man, the Gilded Age sure wouldn't be a Gilded Age without WEIRD 1800'S BIBLE HOAXES. And cities burning down. And race riots. BUT WE'RE FOCUSING ON HOAXES TODAY!
The History of a First Nation: The Story of the Carry the Kettle Nakoda In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Jim Tanner, one of the many authors of a new history of the Nakoda First Nation in Saskatchewan. Entitled Owóknage: The Story of Carry the Kettle Nakoda First Nation, this book was a collective effort by the Nakoda (formerly known as the Assiniboine) First Nation members. The book was published by University of Regina Press in 2022. The book weaves together the oral histories provided by elders and other knowledge holders with the documentary record. Jim Tanner was involved with the First Nation’s land use study and presented the views of the other authors in the study.

This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

If you like our work, please consider supporting it: bit.ly/support_WTY. Your support contributes to the Champlain Society’s mission of opening new windows to directly explore and experience Canada’s past.
S8E3 The Honan Mission – First Generation Canadian Missionaries in China In the late 19th century a number of Canadian missionaries travelled to China ultimately arriving in the province of Honan, north of the Yellow River. These members of the Presbyterian Church of Canada sought to establish a series of missions in the volatile region. They sought to provide health care to the inhabitants while preaching the gospel. Yet, the years would not prove kind to the intrepid evangelists as illness and violent anti-foreign elements would prove to be a constant threat to the survival of the mission and the missionaries themselves. (pictured Paul and Rosalind Goforth)Book recommendation this week is Healing Henan: Canadian Nurses and the North China Mission 1888-1947 by Sonya Gripma, published in 2008 by UBC Press. Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
R v. Morgentaler For almost 20 years, Henry Morgentaler, a Holocaust survivor and doctor, fought provincial and federal governments over abortion laws. Due to his work and his landmark Supreme Court case, Canada is one of the few countries with no laws governing abortion.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
1869: A Prequel to The Golden Compass Hey uhhh… We're in-between-elections right now and uh… It's lookin' like they FINALLY finished building that giant railroad they've been working on for heaven knows how long dude.
Introducing…The Story Of A National Crime 2022 marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of The Story of a National Crime. It was written by Dr. Peter Henderson Bryce. It was an eighteen-page pamphlet containing evidence of neglect, negligence and harm to First Nations children and their communities. From 1904 to 1913, Bryce was the medical inspector for the Department of the Interior and Indian Affairs. It was not the first time he had spoken out. This pamphlet was his appeal for justice and his condemnation of federal inaction. In this series, Knockabout Media looks at the practices, policies, and official correspondence to reveal the intentional actions and acts of indifference that contributed to poor health and lethal outcomes. There will be examples of people who pushed back – the whistleblowers – the parents, the Indigenous communities, the bureaucrats, and members of the clergy. The experts interviewed highlight how archival documents only reveal part of the history and that numerous questions remain.Content Warning: This series talks about Indian Residential Schools, medical racism, segregated health care, and missing patients.If you are a Residential School Survivor or Intergenerational Survivor, you can access support through the National Indian Residential School Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419. Mental health and crisis support is also available through Hope 4 Wellness at 1-855-242-3310.Credits:Written/Produced by Maia-Foster SanchezCo-Producer: Ryan BarnettAdditional Voices: Gabriel MaracleOur series advisors are Teresa Edwards, Kaila Johnston, and Erin Millions.Artwork by Caleb Ellison-DysartA Knockabout Media Production | Funded by the Government of CanadaRSS Feed: https://feeds.acast.com/public/shows/62f15c9db117660012303e1fwww.nationalcrimepod.ca
The Summit Series (Part Seven): Games Seven and Eight After winning Game Six, Canada would tie the series in Game Seven and then, in arguably one of the greatest games ever played, Paul Henderson would cement himself as a Canadian hero with the greatest goal in hockey history in Game Eight.Canada, had won the series.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Hunt For The Mad Trapper It was a manhunt that became part of Canadian folklore. Over the course of two months, Canadians were entranced by the pursuit of the Mad Trapper of Rat River. Some saw him as a hero, fighting against the federal government, while others saw him as a villain for his murder of an RCMP officer.To this day, no one knows who he really was.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Summit Series (Part Eight): The Aftermath Of The Summit Series Canada had won, and Canada was ready to celebrate and welcome home its heroes. The long-term impact of the Summit Series would forever change hockey around the world, and lead to further international contests that put the best-of-the-best against each other.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Summit Series (Part Six): Games Five and Six With the series now shifted to Moscow, Team Canada would begin to come together. The games would feature the fall on the ice by Esposito and The Slash by Clarke. It was in Moscow, that the series began to shift for the Canadians, leading to the eventual series win.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
ELECTION #21! Here we are! The first ever US election since the on-the-books nationwide banning of enslaving humans! Now it's only happening illegally! Anyways, we have a spicy little election here, don't we!
The Summit Series (Part Five): Games Three and Four The series was tied, and with games left to play in Winnipeg and Vancouver, Canadians were hoping that Team Canada would take a commanding lead over the Soviets before the series headed over to Moscow.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
S8E2 The Frontier Constabulary – Canada’s First Secret Police From 1864 until 1871 a relatively secret organisation of Canadian police patrolled Canada’s border with the United States. What began as a mission to prevent increasing tension between Britian and the US evolved into a concerted effort to undermine a major threat to Canadian sovereignty. This threat came from the Irish Republican organization known as the Fenians. Through a complex array of informants and spies on both sides of the border the Canadian secret police (known as the Frontier Constabulary) played a central role in defining Canada’s response to the Fenian threat and became the country’s first ever secret police organisation. Book recommendation: Canadian Spy Story: Irish Revolutionaries and the Secret Police by David A. Wilson published by McGill-Queens Press in 2022. Get add free content at Patreon! Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.
The Expulsion Of The Acadians From Aug. 10, 1755 to July 11, 1764, 11,500 Acadians, 81% of the population in Nova Scotia, were forced off their land to make way for English settlers. Of those who were expelled from their land, 5,000 would die of disease, malnutrition and shipwrecks.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Summit Series (Part Two): The Roster Is Chosen Once the agreements had been signed and everything was agreed upon, it was time to choose the first Team Canada. With the pick of the best NHL players, 35 were chosen but it was not without controversy. The exclusion of WHA players, specifically Bobby Hull, would even be debated in Parliament. Nonetheless, Team Canada was stacked with Hall of Famers.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Summit Series (Part Three): Training Camp Begins For three weeks in August, the 35 players on Team Canada came out to begin training camp. Most never did any sort of conditioning or training in the summer. For the Soviets, training began long before August, and the team was going to be ready to take on Canada in the first game.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Summit Series (Part Four): Games One And Two Team Canada was heading into the first game of the Summit Series with the firm belief they could not lose. They would soon discover that the Russians were not to be taken lightly and Canada was left shocked. By the second game, Canada showed it was not going to go quietly into the night in the series.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Summit Series (Part One): Prelude To The Summit Beginning in 1920, Canada dominated hockey on the international stage, to the point that Canadians became bored with Canada competing. That would change in 1954 when the Soviets began their dominance and Canada soon found itself falling behind.All of this would lead to the Summit Series, when Canada decided to send the best hockey players it had to compete against the best of the Soviets.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
Ulysses S. Grant: Blood-Soaked Rags to Riches! This last prezzy wezzy candidate for 1868 is one of the strangest political anomalies I've ever read about. On the surface, this seems like a typical war hero story. But when you look under the hood, there's a lotta different stuff happening I think!
The History Of Lamont Home to several Ukrainian Churches, as well as Elk Island Park, the history of Lamont includes congregations going to the highest court in the British Empire, the birth of a future Alberta premier, and a terrible school bus tragedy.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
Horatio Seymour: Always a Candidate, Never a Contender Now that we are looking at the presidential candidates for 1868, this guy right here… I have no idea why he keeps being considered like… New York's really connected like that, ain't it?
Oronhyatekha Oronhyatekha was one of the first Indigenous people to earn a medical degree, but he was so much more. He was a successful CEO, skilled in athletics, a friend to royalty, an author and a statesman. Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
S8E1 Kurt Meyer – A War Criminal in Canada Perhaps no single person in the aftermath of the Second World War aroused so much widespread and continued interest in Canada than that of Nazi officer and war criminal Kurt Meyer. Meyer was a murderer, a die hard Nazi, and a ferocious battlefield commander. He ordered the execution of numerous Canadian soldiers during the fighting for Normandy. Despite being found guilty for his crimes, and becoming the only Nazi war criminal imprisoned outside of Germany, his fate became tied up in larger global events and Canadian opinion shifted to reflect these larger global events ultimately changing Meyers fate forever.Book recommendations: Tim Cook's "The Fight for History" Allen Lane, 2020 and Howard Margolian's "Conduct Unbecoming: The Story of the Murder of Prisoners of War in Normandy" UTP Press, 1998 Get add free content at Patreon! Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.
The Summit Series: Training Camp Begins For three weeks in August, the 35 players on Team Canada came out to begin training camp. Most never did any sort of conditioning or training in the summer. For the Soviets, training began long before August, and the team was going to be ready to take on Canada in the first game.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Summit Series: Games One And Two Team Canada was heading into the first game of the Summit Series with the firm belief they could not lose. They would soon discover that the Russians were not to be taken lightly and Canada was left shocked. By the second game, Canada showed it was not going to go quietly into the night in the series.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
The Summit Series: Prelude To The Summit Beginning in 1920, Canada dominated hockey on the international stage, to the point that Canadians became bored with Canada competing. That would change in 1954 when the Soviets began their dominance and Canada soon found itself falling behind.All of this would lead to the Summit Series, when Canada decided to send the best hockey players it had to compete against the best of the Soviets.Support: patreon.com/canadaehxDonate: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/craigUDonate: canadaehx.com (Click Donate)E-mail: [email protected]: twitter.com/craigbairdTiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@cdnhistoryehxYouTube: youtube.com/c/canadianhistoryehx
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