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Holidays

All Audio
Updated On: Nov 04, 2023
Total Stations: 2
Total Audio Titles: 20

Popular “Holidays” Stations

Vurbl Audio for the Holidays Listen to these festive playlists and audio clips of all your favorite holidays. From Christmas, to St. Patrick's Day, Thanksgiving, New Year's, Halloween, Hanukkah, and Mardi Gras, Valentine's Day, and more, this is just the place for all things holidays. Listen in to the histories of different holidays, gift ideas, traditions, celebrities talking about holiday traditions and gifts, and so much more holiday fun. As the year progresses, so do our playlists, we'll always have playlists to suit the occasions of celebration. So listen in and celebrate with Vurbl. Cheers!
St Patrick's Day Podcast Just because St. Patrick's Day only happens on March 17th does not mean you can't enjoy the holiday year round. The St. Patrick's Day Podcast was created to celebrate the music and culture of the Irish through this great holiday. There are two main goals for this podcast. The first reason is that I want to introduce you to some of the best independent Celtic music that you can find online. There's a lot of bands who struggle hard to be heard. And I want you to hear them without all the chatter. That's right. To steal a phrase from terrestrial radio: less talk, more music. That means you will have a ton of music that you can play over and over again for your St. Paddy's Day celebrations. The second reason is because I am dedicated to helping independent Celtic musicians be heard. To do that, I want to connect you the Celtic music fan to some Celtic musicians I hope you will love. And if you do love their music, all I ask is that you drop by their website and buy a CD when you get a chance.
‎SunflowerRadio's Specials and Holidays SunflowerRadio is bringing you some or our special shows and the music and shows related to the Holidays, from New Year's Eve to the Christmastime events!

Popular “Holidays” Playlists

Relationship Advice: Valentine's Day Ideas Whether you've been with your partner for decades or are in a new relationship, Valentine's Day can be overwhelming. We're here to help. Listen to this quick guide to a variety of Valentine's day ideas like gifts, dates, and even some ideas to try out in the bedroom, and more. Vurbl Best of Sex, Sexuality & Relationships
Relaxing Christmas Music | Classic Carols on the Piano Set a warm and cozy atmosphere with this relaxing Christmas music. ??? Features a collection of traditional instrumental Christmas songs on piano arranged and performed by Clarisse. Merry Christmas everyone!? Dream Sounds
Strange & Unusual True Christmas Stories The best Christmas stories from the Useless Information podcast. Useless Information Podcast
Holiday Horrors Bloodbath Podcasts playlist of Holiday true crime cases! ‎Bloodbath a True Crime Podcast
Haunted Holidays Most people associate ghost and the paranormal with the spooky month of October, but winter and the holiday season is way more weird and creepy. In this playlist we are going to explore weird traditions and holiday hauntings from around the world and why the winter holidays are more paranormal than Halloween! The Unseen Paranormal Podcast
Hops and Floptober For Halloween season, we tackled some of our favorite horror-centric flops. Hops and Box Office Flops

I am excited to be your guide. While my focus right now is USA Thanksgiving, it could work for any event you are planning.

I use these exact tips for every holiday or event that I host. I want to see you have immediate wins around simplifying so I am offering you encouragement and practical tips to succeed.

Email me at [email protected]

My website: https://soulworkwithpatricia.com/” id=”1WWnVKnMUOk” vid=”1WWnVKnMUOk” id-for-player=”1WWnVKnMUOk” link=”/playlists/1WWnVKnMUOk/” is-authorized=”false” csrf=”S4XJbFNFdMge01XCLwf9XzfqrZES5CJRUdduL8mvAEQKHDpUEW5t7r451S4pBMpN” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
5 days to Simplify Your Holiday Welcome to 5 days to Simplify Your Holiday

I am excited to be your guide. While my focus right now is USA Thanksgiving, it could work for any event you are planning.

I use these exact tips for every holiday or event that I host. I want to see you have immediate wins around simplifying so I am offering you encouragement and practical tips to succeed.

Email me at [email protected]

My website: https://soulworkwithpatricia.com/
Our Imperfect Life Podcast
Ghostly stories for Halloween Our spookiest stories – don’t listen in the dark Story Radio Podcast
Vlad the Impaler Want to spend Halloween at Vlad’s castle? You can! Over 65 and Talking
Halloween Erotica, Horror Erotica This playlist is to showcase the podcast episodes that relate to Halloween, Halloween Erotica, Horror erotica, and all this spooky! Get mesmerized, enchanted, hypnotized by steamy stories that tie sexuality to the mystical nature of all things Halloween. Oh F*ck Yeah with Ruan Willow

All “Holidays” Audio

Lindisfarne – 1976 Christmas Concert – Newcastle City Hall – Past Daily Backstage Pass – Holiday Edition. Lindisfarne and the legendary one-off Christmas Concert from December 23, 1976. Broadcast live from the stage of the Newcastle City Hall. One of the real lynchpins in the English Folk-Rock movement, they were a band which had a massive following throughout England and much of Europe. Not so much in the U.S.(except the West Coast who loved them), though they did tour often during their various incarnations. They were also one of those bands who did a magnificent job live but didn’t match the level of their live shows on vinyl. And even though they had a string of hit singles and their first two releases were their best selling albums – the hits weren’t consistent, largely because they were a band, like so many during the 60s and 70s, whose concerts were far better received on a consistent basis than their studio endeavors. Lindisfarne formed in 1968, originally called Brethren. The original line-up comprised Alan Hull (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Ray Jackson (vocals, mandolin, harmonica), Simon Cowe (guitar, mandolin, banjo, keyboards), Rod Clements (bass guitar, violin) and Ray Laidlaw (drums). In 1970, Tony Stratton-Smith signed them to Charisma Records and their debut album Nicely Out of Tune was released that year. This album defined their mixture of bright harmony and up tempo folk rock. Neither single released from the album, “Clear White Light” or “Lady Eleanor”, charted; nor did the album itself at first. However, the band obtained a strong following from its popular live concerts and built a reputation as one of the top festival bands. Their second album Fog on the Tyne (1971) produced by Bob Johnston, began their commercial success. This album reached No. 1 in the UK Albums Chart the following year. The extracted single “Meet Me on the Corner”, composed by Clements and sung by Jackson, reached No. 5 in the UK Singles Chart and remains the only Lindisfarne song to win an Ivor Novello Award. The performance of this song on BBC TV’s Top of the Pops featured Laidlaw striking a large bass drum with a rubber fish. “Lady Eleanor” was reissued as a follow-up to “Meet Me on the Corner” and reached No. 3 in the UK and No. 82 in the US. The debut album Nicely Out of Tune belatedly made the UK Albums Chart Top 10 and the band began to attract a larger media following, with some calling Hull the greatest songwriter since Bob Dylan. The band were referred to as the “1970s Beatles”. In 1972, they recorded their third album, Dingly Dell, but the band were unhappy with the initial production and remixed it themselves. It was released in September 1972 and entered the Top 10 in the first week, receiving lukewarm reviews. The ecologically themed single “All Fall Down” was a UK Singles Chart No. 34 hit and the second single “Court in the Act” failed completely. Internal tensions surfaced during a disappointing tour of Australia in early 1973. Hull initially considered leaving the band, but was persuaded to reconsider. It was agreed that he and Jackson would keep the group name while Cowe, Clements and Laidlaw left to form their own outfit Jack the Lad. They were replaced by Tommy Duffy (bass guitar), Kenny Craddock (keyboards), Charlie Harcourt (guitar) and Paul Nichols (drums). The new line-up lacked the appeal of the original and with Hull also pursuing a solo career, the band’s next two albums Roll on Ruby and Happy Daze and the subsequent singles failed to chart and they disbanded in 1975. Nichols subsequently joined the hard rock supergroup Widowmaker. The original line-up of Alan Hull, Ray Jackson, Ray Laidlaw, Rod Clements and Simon Cowe reformed in 1976 to perform this one-off gig in Newcastle City Hall before returning to their other projects. The Newcastle City Hall reunion was so acclaimed that the band repeated it a year later and decided to get back together on a permanent basis in early 1978, Jack the Lad having disbanded after none of their singles or albums on two different labels made the charts. They continued to perform at Newcastle City Hall every Christmas for many years performing a total of 132 shows at the venue overall. In case you missed it – here it is – all 99 minutes worth. Grab an Egg-Nog, get comfy and crank this one up. Merry Christmas!
Lindisfarne – 1976 Christmas Concert – Newcastle City Hall – Past Daily Backstage Pass – Holiday Edition. Lindisfarne and the legendary one-off Christmas Concert from December 23, 1976. Broadcast live from the stage of the Newcastle City Hall. One of the real lynchpins in the English Folk-Rock movement, they were a band which had a massive following throughout England and much of Europe. Not so much in the U.S.(except the West Coast who loved them), though they did tour often during their various incarnations. They were also one of those bands who did a magnificent job live but didn’t match the level of their live shows on vinyl. And even though they had a string of hit singles and their first two releases were their best selling albums – the hits weren’t consistent, largely because they were a band, like so many during the 60s and 70s, whose concerts were far better received on a consistent basis than their studio endeavors. Lindisfarne formed in 1968, originally called Brethren. The original line-up comprised Alan Hull (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Ray Jackson (vocals, mandolin, harmonica), Simon Cowe (guitar, mandolin, banjo, keyboards), Rod Clements (bass guitar, violin) and Ray Laidlaw (drums). In 1970, Tony Stratton-Smith signed them to Charisma Records and their debut album Nicely Out of Tune was released that year. This album defined their mixture of bright harmony and up tempo folk rock. Neither single released from the album, “Clear White Light” or “Lady Eleanor”, charted; nor did the album itself at first. However, the band obtained a strong following from its popular live concerts and built a reputation as one of the top festival bands. Their second album Fog on the Tyne (1971) produced by Bob Johnston, began their commercial success. This album reached No. 1 in the UK Albums Chart the following year. The extracted single “Meet Me on the Corner”, composed by Clements and sung by Jackson, reached No. 5 in the UK Singles Chart and remains the only Lindisfarne song to win an Ivor Novello Award. The performance of this song on BBC TV’s Top of the Pops featured Laidlaw striking a large bass drum with a rubber fish. “Lady Eleanor” was reissued as a follow-up to “Meet Me on the Corner” and reached No. 3 in the UK and No. 82 in the US. The debut album Nicely Out of Tune belatedly made the UK Albums Chart Top 10 and the band began to attract a larger media following, with some calling Hull the greatest songwriter since Bob Dylan. The band were referred to as the “1970s Beatles”. In 1972, they recorded their third album, Dingly Dell, but the band were unhappy with the initial production and remixed it themselves. It was released in September 1972 and entered the Top 10 in the first week, receiving lukewarm reviews. The ecologically themed single “All Fall Down” was a UK Singles Chart No. 34 hit and the second single “Court in the Act” failed completely. Internal tensions surfaced during a disappointing tour of Australia in early 1973. Hull initially considered leaving the band, but was persuaded to reconsider. It was agreed that he and Jackson would keep the group name while Cowe, Clements and Laidlaw left to form their own outfit Jack the Lad. They were replaced by Tommy Duffy (bass guitar), Kenny Craddock (keyboards), Charlie Harcourt (guitar) and Paul Nichols (drums). The new line-up lacked the appeal of the original and with Hull also pursuing a solo career, the band’s next two albums Roll on Ruby and Happy Daze and the subsequent singles failed to chart and they disbanded in 1975. Nichols subsequently joined the hard rock supergroup Widowmaker. The original line-up of Alan Hull, Ray Jackson, Ray Laidlaw, Rod Clements and Simon Cowe reformed in 1976 to perform this one-off gig in Newcastle City Hall before returning to their other projects. The Newcastle City Hall reunion was so acclaimed that the band repeated it a year later and decided to get back together on a permanent basis in early 1978, Jack the Lad having disbanded after none of their singles or albums on two different labels made the charts. They continued to perform at Newcastle City Hall every Christmas for many years performing a total of 132 shows at the venue overall. In case you missed it – here it is – all 99 minutes worth. Grab an Egg-Nog, get comfy and crank this one up. Merry Christmas!
Christmas Sing With Bing – Bing Crosby – 1958 – Past Daily Holiday Pop Chronicles. Contrary to rumors that he hated it, Bing Crosby has become synonymous with Christmas and Christmas music. Starting in 1954 and going up to his death, Bing Crosby became the epitome of the Holiday season with a yearly music special. First on radio and then on television. Coupled with the almost constant runnings of White Christmas and Holiday Inn on TV, the image of Bing Crosby as all things Christmas is embedded deep in the American psyche and has pretty much stayed that way for the past 60+ years. Following the demise of the traditional weekly Bing Crosby variety show in the spring of 1954, to be replaced by a nightly 15-minute disc-jockey format show, radio listeners missed out on a full-fledged, half-hour Christmas program hosted by Crosby for the first time in twenty years. In 1955, this situation was remedied when Crosby, the undisputed voice of Christmas at the time, embarked on one of his most ambitious radio projects ever; a transcribed one-hour Christmas spectacular featuring guest artists that spanned the entire globe. It was called “A Christmas Sing with Bing” and the success of the initial broadcast resulted in the show running each year until 1962. Since his death, the popularity of Bing Crosby around Christmas time hasn’t diminished by much. But there are many people who don’t know about the yearly ritual of Bing’s televised sing-alongs. So as a reminder of the earlier ones on radio, here is the 1958 edition of A Christmas Sing With Bing, as it was originally broadcast on December 24th, 1958. And a Merry Christmas to all from the gang at Past Daily!

Starting in 1954 and going up to his death, Bing Crosby became the epitome of the Holiday season with a yearly music special. First on radio and then on television. Coupled with the almost c” id=”1ZvsAj41vb2″ vid=”1ZvsAj41vb2″ id-for-player=”1ZvsAj41vb2″ link=”/listen/christmas-sing-with-bing-bing-crosby-1958-past-daily-holiday-pop-chronicles-1ZvsAj41vb2/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Christmas Sing With Bing – Bing Crosby – 1958 – Past Daily Holiday Pop Chronicles. Contrary to rumors that he hated it, Bing Crosby has become synonymous with Christmas and Christmas music.

Starting in 1954 and going up to his death, Bing Crosby became the epitome of the Holiday season with a yearly music special. First on radio and then on television. Coupled with the almost constant runnings of White Christmas and Holiday Inn on TV, the image of Bing Crosby as all things Christmas is embedded deep in the American psyche and has pretty much stayed that way for the past 60+ years.

Following the demise of the traditional weekly Bing Crosby variety show in the spring of 1954, to be replaced by a nightly 15-minute disc-jockey format show, radio listeners missed out on a full-fledged, half-hour Christmas program hosted by Crosby for the first time in twenty years. In 1955, this situation was remedied when Crosby, the undisputed voice of Christmas at the time, embarked on one of his most ambitious radio projects ever; a transcribed one-hour Christmas spectacular featuring guest artists that spanned the entire globe. It was called “A Christmas Sing with Bing” and the success of the initial broadcast resulted in the show running each year until 1962.

Since his death, the popularity of Bing Crosby around Christmas time hasn’t diminished by much. But there are many people who don’t know about the yearly ritual of Bing’s televised sing-alongs.

So as a reminder of the earlier ones on radio, here is the 1958 edition of A Christmas Sing With Bing, as it was originally broadcast on December 24th, 1958.

And a Merry Christmas to all from the gang at Past Daily!
It's Christmas 1965 – You're A Teenager – You Live In L.A. You Were Voted Class Santa – You Haven't Been The Same Since. Some things you just don’t forget – you try. But every year around this time you can’t help it. The mere sight of some smiling Santa somewhere – some ad, a billboard, even a passing reference to anything Red with a White Beard and you break out in a rash. Been that way for almost 60 years – and people wonder. Your Senior year you were voted Class Santa. Nobody else was nominated – you won by default. Your buddies broke up laughing when they heard. They knew – every guy in your class knew. Spending your entire Christmas Vacation sitting in the toy department in the basement at Sears, listening to kids all day may have been an honor bestowed on your school by your local Sears-Roebucks, but you saw it as a life sentence to wear an enormous three-sizes-too-big itchy Red Suit, A sweat-producing white beard and a giant brain-scorching Wool hat. To bellow Ho-Ho-Ho seven hours a day – be pee’d on, barfed on, punched and cussed out by micro-malcontents who didn’t get the American Flyer City of St. Louis Train set they asked for the Christmas before and wanted you to know about it. And to do it every day until closing time on Christmas Eve – and best of all; not get paid for it – not even class credit. “To do it for the honor of the School” was the Boys vice-Principal’s sage advice. You endured – you listened – you bellowed. You grew to hate The Chipmunk’s Christmas Song – you were horrified by just how greedy little kids were. But you prevailed. And at the end of two weeks the Store Manager handed you a $10.00 gift certificate and a slug on the arm, a sort of “atta-boy”, for all the hours and personalities you had to endure. You were invited to the Store Christmas Party as a bonus – free food and getting sloshed on Party Punch was appealing, and maybe a way of making up for the endurance test. But you had to wear the Santa Suit. Not so bad, considering the clientele was older and some of the salesgirls were indescribable. But you quickly realized playing Santa for the Office Christmas Party was not all that different than playing Santa in the Toy Department. Being pee’d on, barfed on, punched and cussed out by wildly drunken Sears Employees was a little different, but no less messy. And after that, you and Santa were never on speaking terms. And Christmas makes you break out in a cold sweat. At least you got to spend two weeks in the Sears Toy Department outfitted with a transistor radio and an earphone – KHJ was helping you survive – big time. Here is 45 minutes were of The Real Don Steele from KHJ for December 23, 1965. Ho-ho-ho. Merry Christmas from Past Daily!
It's Christmas 1965 – You're A Teenager – You Live In L.A. You Were Voted Class Santa – You Haven't Been The Same Since. Some things you just don’t forget – you try. But every year around this time you can’t help it. The mere sight of some smiling Santa somewhere – some ad, a billboard, even a passing reference to anything Red with a White Beard and you break out in a rash. Been that way for almost 60 years – and people wonder. Your Senior year you were voted Class Santa. Nobody else was nominated – you won by default. Your buddies broke up laughing when they heard. They knew – every guy in your class knew. Spending your entire Christmas Vacation sitting in the toy department in the basement at Sears, listening to kids all day may have been an honor bestowed on your school by your local Sears-Roebucks, but you saw it as a life sentence to wear an enormous three-sizes-too-big itchy Red Suit, A sweat-producing white beard and a giant brain-scorching Wool hat. To bellow Ho-Ho-Ho seven hours a day – be pee’d on, barfed on, punched and cussed out by micro-malcontents who didn’t get the American Flyer City of St. Louis Train set they asked for the Christmas before and wanted you to know about it. And to do it every day until closing time on Christmas Eve – and best of all; not get paid for it – not even class credit. “To do it for the honor of the School” was the Boys vice-Principal’s sage advice. You endured – you listened – you bellowed. You grew to hate The Chipmunk’s Christmas Song – you were horrified by just how greedy little kids were. But you prevailed. And at the end of two weeks the Store Manager handed you a $10.00 gift certificate and a slug on the arm, a sort of “atta-boy”, for all the hours and personalities you had to endure. You were invited to the Store Christmas Party as a bonus – free food and getting sloshed on Party Punch was appealing, and maybe a way of making up for the endurance test. But you had to wear the Santa Suit. Not so bad, considering the clientele was older and some of the salesgirls were indescribable. But you quickly realized playing Santa for the Office Christmas Party was not all that different than playing Santa in the Toy Department. Being pee’d on, barfed on, punched and cussed out by wildly drunken Sears Employees was a little different, but no less messy. And after that, you and Santa were never on speaking terms. And Christmas makes you break out in a cold sweat. At least you got to spend two weeks in the Sears Toy Department outfitted with a transistor radio and an earphone – KHJ was helping you survive – big time. Here is 45 minutes were of The Real Don Steele from KHJ for December 23, 1965. Ho-ho-ho. Merry Christmas from Past Daily!
It's Christmas 1965 – You're A Teenager -You Live In L.A. – You Were Voted Class Santa – You Haven't Been The Same Since. Some things you just don’t forget – you try. But every year around this time you can’t help it. The mere sight of some smiling Santa somewhere – some ad, a billboard, even a passing reference to anything Red with a White Beard and you break out in a rash. Been that way for almost 60 years – and people wonder.

Your Senior year you were voted Class Santa. Nobody else was nominated – you won by default. Your buddies broke up laughing when they heard. They knew – every guy in your class knew. Spending your entire Christmas Vacation sitting in the toy department in the basement at Sears, listening to kids all day may have been an honor bestowed on your school by your local Sears-Roebucks, but you saw it as a life sentence to wear an enormous three-sizes-too-big itchy Red Suit, A sweat-producing white beard and a giant brain-scorching Wool hat. To bellow Ho-Ho-Ho seven hours a day – be pee’d on, barfed on, punched and cussed out by micro-malcontents who didn’t get the American Flyer City of St. Louis Train set they asked for the Christmas before and wanted you to know about it. And to do it every day until closing time on Christmas Eve – and best of all; not get paid for it – not even class credit. “To do it for the honor of the School” was the Boys vice-Principal’s sage advice.

You endured – you listened – you bellowed. You grew to hate The Chipmunk’s Christmas Song – you were horrified by just how greedy little kids were. But you prevailed. And at the end of two weeks the Store Manager handed you a $10.00 gift certificate and a slug on the arm, a sort of “atta-boy”, for all the hours and personalities you had to endure. You were invited to the Store Christmas Party as a bonus – free food and getting sloshed on Party Punch was appealing, and maybe a way of making up for the endurance test.

But you had to wear the Santa Suit. Not so bad, considering the clientele was older and some of the salesgirls were indescribable. But you quickly realized playing Santa for the Office Christmas Party was not all that different than playing Santa in the Toy Department. Being pee’d on, barfed on, punched and cussed out by wildly drunken Sears Employees was a little different, but no less messy.

And after that, you and Santa were never on speaking terms. And Christmas makes you break out in a cold sweat.

At least you got to spend two weeks in the Sears Toy Department outfitted with a transistor radio and an earphone – KHJ was helping you survive – big time.

Here is 45 minutes were of The Real Don Steele from KHJ for December 23, 1965. Ho-ho-ho.

Merry Christmas from Past Daily!
It's Christmas 1965 – You're A Teenager -You Live In L.A. – You Were Voted Class Santa – You Haven't Been The Same Since. Some things you just don’t forget – you try. But every year around this time you can’t help it. The mere sight of some smiling Santa somewhere – some ad, a billboard, even a passing reference to anything Red with a White Beard and you break out in a rash. Been that way for almost 60 years – and people wonder.

Your Senior year you were voted Class Santa. Nobody else was nominated – you won by default. Your buddies broke up laughing when they heard. They knew – every guy in your class knew. Spending your entire Christmas Vacation sitting in the toy department in the basement at Sears, listening to kids all day may have been an honor bestowed on your school by your local Sears-Roebucks, but you saw it as a life sentence to wear an enormous three-sizes-too-big itchy Red Suit, A sweat-producing white beard and a giant brain-scorching Wool hat. To bellow Ho-Ho-Ho seven hours a day – be pee’d on, barfed on, punched and cussed out by micro-malcontents who didn’t get the American Flyer City of St. Louis Train set they asked for the Christmas before and wanted you to know about it. And to do it every day until closing time on Christmas Eve – and best of all; not get paid for it – not even class credit. “To do it for the honor of the School” was the Boys vice-Principal’s sage advice.

You endured – you listened – you bellowed. You grew to hate The Chipmunk’s Christmas Song – you were horrified by just how greedy little kids were. But you prevailed. And at the end of two weeks the Store Manager handed you a $10.00 gift certificate and a slug on the arm, a sort of “atta-boy”, for all the hours and personalities you had to endure. You were invited to the Store Christmas Party as a bonus – free food and getting sloshed on Party Punch was appealing, and maybe a way of making up for the endurance test.

But you had to wear the Santa Suit. Not so bad, considering the clientele was older and some of the salesgirls were indescribable. But you quickly realized playing Santa for the Office Christmas Party was not all that different than playing Santa in the Toy Department. Being pee’d on, barfed on, punched and cussed out by wildly drunken Sears Employees was a little different, but no less messy.

And after that, you and Santa were never on speaking terms. And Christmas makes you break out in a cold sweat.

At least you got to spend two weeks in the Sears Toy Department outfitted with a transistor radio and an earphone – KHJ was helping you survive – big time.

Here is 45 minutes were of The Real Don Steele from KHJ for December 23, 1965. Ho-ho-ho.

Merry Christmas from Past Daily!
Cooking Up A Christmas In 1967 With Chef Mike Roy – Past Daily Weekend Pop Chronicles Cooking programs were a regular staple in the daily diet of a radio station up until the 1990s. Most are gone now. The few that are left are relegated to weekend programming via Public Radio. But during their heyday, just about every major city in the country boasted its own chef/gastronomic personality, doling out recipes and tips on food and market specials every day, usually in the late morning, on the radio. One such personality was Mike Roy who, along with co-host Denny Bracken, held court over one of the most popular cooking shows broadcast throughout the 1960s via KNX in Los Angeles. Roy, who had an encyclopedic knowledge of recipes and food in general, had a habit of reciting recipes from memory and came to symbolize what food preparation was all about in the 1960s. Here is one of those daily broadcasts over KNX from December 18, 1967. And since it was so close to Christmas, the entire program is given over to preparations for the Holiday season. It’s an interesting slice of Los Angeles history. Roy runs through the names of numerous landmark restaurants in L.A. at the time, most of which have long since vanished from the scene. It’s also an interesting glimpse into our eating habits of 45 years ago, and just what constituted an elegant meal in Southern California in 1967. Needless to say, our concept of food and its preparation have certainly changed over the years. Here is that Christmas Cooking Program from the Chef Mike Roy Program of December 18, 1967 via KNX-AM in Los Angeles.
Thanksgiving With Jean Shepherd -1968 – Past Daily Holiday Pop Chronicles. Jean Shepherd – WOR – Thanksgiving Turkey – November 24, 1968 – Gordon Skene Sound Collection – Thanksgiving 1968 as interpreted by Jean Shepherd via his daily radio program over WOR, this November 24th in 1968. In our current confusing and somewhat contentious atmosphere, American humorists appear to be a dying species, if not an almost completely underground one. Humor in America has taken some pretty big knocks these past couple of years. The notion that someone like Jean Shepherd, who came to symbolize the somewhat haywire aspects of our society all through the 50s up to the 70s may very well not be on the radio today if he were still alive. I think we’ve lost our sense of humor because we no longer know what is funny or what is perceived to be funny. We have traded irony for snark and foible for abuse. We no longer are able to laugh with people out of fear we may be perceived as laughing at them. Jean Shepherd was a master of irony – his view of the world was deep rooted in empathy for the average person just trying to get through the average day. Humor reigns in adversity – the unfairness of life is often captured as an absurdity – Jean Shepherd gleefully pointed that out and we caught ourselves nodding with approval. Sadly, the world has turned on its axis and there has become no room to examine the absurd – to make light of the dire (because there is no longer anything funny about being broke or dealing with Social Services) – to laugh at ourselves because the person in the mirror sees no future – because we can’t see the humor, wallowing in anger and an unmet expectation and not much to be thankful for, this Thanksgiving. So listening to Jean Shepherd these days is peering in on a life that no longer exists. And even though 1968 was no walk in the park, there was still humor to be had, shortcomings to laugh at out of empathy and not ridicule and some light, no matter how faint, at the end of the tunnel. We got through it and came out the other end. And Jean Shepherd helped us see that. I miss him a lot – I miss us a lot. I wish we were kind. Enjoy Thanksgiving.
It's Thanksgiving 1970 – You Don't Live In L.A. Anymore – It's Your First Holiday Away From Home – You May Never Go Back. You graduated high school and went away to college – it’s your first time having a holiday away from home. Thanksgiving was never very high on your list of memorable moments growing up anyway. Your family didn’t actually DO Thanksgiving, that was something your Aunt did. This year they all decided it should be a big family event; in Las Vegas. You hate Las Vegas – there’s never been anything for you to do there, except lay around the swimming pool and watch people. So when your roommate told you the dorm was doing an orphan’s Thanksgiving, you jumped on it. Twenty of you, taking over the Dorm kitchen – food riot would best describe it. Three turkey’s, two 25 pound sacks of potatoes, 40 pies (at last count), enough assorted vegetables to feed most of downtown Berkeley and gallon jugs of Gallo Hearty Burgundy, lined up along the counter. You counted 20 and more kept showing up – your Dixie cup was never empty and somewhere between boiling the potatoes, passing two joints around and scarfing down an entire cherry pie on your own you blanked out. All you know for sure is; there had to be around a hundred people who showed up, you fell in love at least five times that day – with whom, it wasn’t exactly clear. But you do remember laughing a lot and throwing up a couple times in a wastebasket and dancing on the dining room table. A lot of yelling and tons of leftover food. And you finally figured out that this was what Thanksgiving was all about. And providing the musical backdrop was a beat-up Philco radio, perched on top of the refrigerator, pumping out Bwana Johnny at KYA to the point of distortion. Good times, great food, slurred words and a raging hangover the next morning. And you can hardly wait for Christmas and New Years to do it all over again. Welcome to your college days.
Memorial Day 1953 – President Eisenhower. It was sixty-nine years ago this Memorial Day that President Eisenhower officially proclaimed Memorial Day to be a National Day of Remembrance. A day of remembrance for those who fell at the end of the Civil War, the day has come to symbolize a time of remembrance to those Americans who fell in all wars with a one minute observance to be held at 11:00 am on the last day of May. Here is President Eisenhower‘s declaration as read by actor Robert Montgomery for Memorial Day in 1953. By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Whereas the bodies of our war dead lie buried in hallowed plots throughout the land, and it has long been our custom to decorate their graves on Memorial Day in token of our respect for them as beloved friends and kinsmen and of our aspiration that war may be removed from the earth forever; and Whereas it is fitting that, while remembering the sacrifices of our countrymen, we join in united prayers to Almighty God for peace on earth; and Whereas the Congress, in a joint resolution approved May 11, 1950, provided that Memorial Day should thenceforth be set aside nationally as a day of prayer for permanent peace and requested that the President issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day in that manner: Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Memorial Day, Saturday, May 30, 1953, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning at eleven o’clock in the morning of that day, Eastern Daylight Saving Time, as a period in which all the people of the Nation, each according to his religious faith, may unite in solemn prayer. Let us make that day one of twofold dedication. Let us reverently honor those who have fallen in war, and rededicate ourselves through prayer to the cause of peace, to the end that the day may come when we shall never have another war—never another Unknown Soldier. In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed. Lest we all forget . . .

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Memorial Day 1953 – President Eisenhower It was sixty-nine years ago this Memorial Day that President Eisenhower officially proclaimed Memorial Day to be a National Day of Remembrance.

A day of remembrance for those who fell at the end of the Civil War, the day has come to symbolize a time of remembrance to those Americans who fell in all wars with a one minute observance to be held at 11:00 am on the last day of May.

Here is President Eisenhower‘s declaration as read by actor Robert Montgomery for Memorial Day in 1953.

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation
Whereas the bodies of our war dead lie buried in hallowed plots throughout the land, and it has long been our custom to decorate their graves on Memorial Day in token of our respect for them as beloved friends and kinsmen and of our aspiration that war may be removed from the earth forever; and

Whereas it is fitting that, while remembering the sacrifices of our countrymen, we join in united prayers to Almighty God for peace on earth; and

Whereas the Congress, in a joint resolution approved May 11, 1950, provided that Memorial Day should thenceforth be set aside nationally as a day of prayer for permanent peace and requested that the President issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day in that manner:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Memorial Day, Saturday, May 30, 1953, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning at eleven o’clock in the morning of that day, Eastern Daylight Saving Time, as a period in which all the people of the Nation, each according to his religious faith, may unite in solemn prayer.

Let us make that day one of twofold dedication. Let us reverently honor those who have fallen in war, and rededicate ourselves through prayer to the cause of peace, to the end that the day may come when we shall never have another war—never another Unknown Soldier.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Lest we all forget . . .

A day of remembrance for those who fell at the end of the Civil War, the day has come to symbolize a time of remembrance to those Americans who fell in a” id=”1YaZVT0WC5y” vid=”1YaZVT0WC5y” id-for-player=”1YaZVT0WC5y” link=”/listen/memorial-day-1953-president-eisenhower-1YaZVT0WC5y/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Memorial Day 1953 – President Eisenhower It was sixty-nine years ago this Memorial Day that President Eisenhower officially proclaimed Memorial Day to be a National Day of Remembrance.

A day of remembrance for those who fell at the end of the Civil War, the day has come to symbolize a time of remembrance to those Americans who fell in all wars with a one minute observance to be held at 11:00 am on the last day of May.

Here is President Eisenhower‘s declaration as read by actor Robert Montgomery for Memorial Day in 1953.

By the President of the United States of America

A Proclamation
Whereas the bodies of our war dead lie buried in hallowed plots throughout the land, and it has long been our custom to decorate their graves on Memorial Day in token of our respect for them as beloved friends and kinsmen and of our aspiration that war may be removed from the earth forever; and

Whereas it is fitting that, while remembering the sacrifices of our countrymen, we join in united prayers to Almighty God for peace on earth; and

Whereas the Congress, in a joint resolution approved May 11, 1950, provided that Memorial Day should thenceforth be set aside nationally as a day of prayer for permanent peace and requested that the President issue a proclamation calling upon the people of the United States to observe each Memorial Day in that manner:

Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim Memorial Day, Saturday, May 30, 1953, as a day of prayer for permanent peace, and I designate the hour beginning at eleven o’clock in the morning of that day, Eastern Daylight Saving Time, as a period in which all the people of the Nation, each according to his religious faith, may unite in solemn prayer.

Let us make that day one of twofold dedication. Let us reverently honor those who have fallen in war, and rededicate ourselves through prayer to the cause of peace, to the end that the day may come when we shall never have another war—never another Unknown Soldier.

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

Lest we all forget . . .
Avoid Going into the New Year in Debt First thing to keep from over spending: Why are you giving a gift?
How Not to Overspend This Holiday Holiday spending can quickly turn into overspending and anxiety. For so many, the new year means debt and struggles caused by gift giving gone rogue. In this playlist I share tips and ideas for not turning the holiday cheer into holiday fear.
Juneteenth: Past and Present | A Vurbl Audio History Audio Intro Happy Juneteenth from Vurbl! Discover the traditions and history of Juneteenth with this playlist full of audio from conversations with historians, journalists, and people who have been celebrating the holiday for years. Listen through to the end to hear why Juneteenth might soon become a national holiday. Enjoy!
Father’s Day Gift Ideas from C.O. Bigelow’s Ian and Alec Ginsburg Listen in to this quick gift guide to Father’s Day from Ian and Alec Ginsburg. Discover ideas like skincare products, candles, body washes, and more.
Audio History of St Patrick's Day Audio Intro The history of St. Patrick's Day is full of surprises. For instance, did you know that St. Patrick wasn't actually Irish? Or that a traditional St. Patrick's Day meal would involve smoked eel? Listen to these snippets from the best podcasts about St. Patrick's Day to find out everything about St. Patrick's life and the holiday that it inspired. And hang around for some true-crime stories et in from Dublin, and cooking tips for authentic Irish recipes.
Snippet from Christmas Clatter: Santa Inc (Audio) Christmas Clatter host Todd interviews Chris Livingston on his new fiction book called Santa Inc, which is a modern adaptation of Charles Dickens and tells the story of a little boy named Eric who unlocks the whimsical world of Santa.