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Birds

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Updated On: Aug 08, 2022
Total Stations: 1
Total Audio Titles: 26
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Popular "Birds" Stations

I Like Birds I Like Birds is a show that can potentially change your life. We grow in our faith together. You learn as I learn. Hear about the Good News in a raw and real way. I hope this show can be a seed for you to know God better than you did yesterday. "Faith Comes from Hearing." You will hear the love, joy, and everlasting pursuit of Jesus on every episode. We seek truth.
I hope you find this show at the perfect time. The door is always open. Jump in wherever, whenever; Jesus is always ready for you. God is GOOD! Jesus is Dope! I like the Bible & I like Words, Therefore I like Birds! Let’s Grow!
Talkin' Birds Ray Brown's Talkin' Birds is a call-in show of entertaining conversation about wild birds -- attracting them to your back yard, identifying them, feeding them, and learning more about them along the way. Every week, we have contests for prizes like bird feeders and other great bird-related stuff, along with expert guests. So, whether you're an experienced birder, or you're new to birding, listen in, and be part of the show by calling in with a question, sharing some information or observations, or trying for one of our prizes. It's birdwatching--in the backyard and beyond.
Nature Centered from Wild Birds Unlimited A podcast from Wild Birds Unlimited about feeding the birds and enjoying nature right in your own backyard. Relax, enjoy the birds, and stay Nature Centered.
Bird Banter On BirdBanter Dr. Ed Pullen will talk birding with other birders. Birding stories of travel, experiences, friendships and great bird sightings and adventures will be open topics of discussion.
My Dog Hunts - Upland Birds Where-to, how-to and when-to bird hunting advice on pheasant, partridge, ruffed grouse, sharptails, prairie chickens and quail, Host Randy Shepard has bird hunted from Oregon to Wisconsin to New Mexico and Arizona.He's taken 15 different combination limits and four different double limits of upland birds across the mid-west. He's never hired a guide, leased land, hunted as a guest or engaged in a swap hunt, while in pursuit of dual limits. All self-made, self-planned hunts, on public (and a little bit of private) land.
The Science of Birds The Science of Birds is a lighthearted, guided exploration of bird biology. It's a fun resource for any birder or naturalist who wants to learn more about ornithology. Impress your birding friends at cocktail parties with all of your new bird knowledge! Hosted by Ivan Phillipsen, a passionate naturalist with a PhD in Zoology.

Popular "Birds" Playlists

Deep Dive: Endangered Species Enjoy the best wildlife podcasts episodes that talk about some of the most critically endangered species in existence. Listen to experts talk about some of your favorite animals that are on the verge of extinction and learn about ways you can help. Vurbl Animals: Stories, Training & Pet Health
Best Pet Care Audio On Vurbl Are you an animal lover who’s looking for the top tips on how to care for your pet? Whether you have a furry friend or a reptilian companion, Vurbl has you covered with the best podcasts about animal husbandry, healthcare and more whenever you need them. Tune in now to podcasts like Wag Woof Love, Goat Gab, and Animals Today to learn how to keep your pet(s) happy and healthy! Vurbl Animals: Stories, Training & Pet Health
Down and Back: Season 1 In season 1 of Down and Back: Stories From the American Kennel Club Archives, we explored the beginnings of Obedience in America, dogs of war, breeds saved from extinction, and plenty more. Catch on on epsiodes you missed. ‎Down and Back: Dog Stories From the American Kennel Club Archives
Down and Back: Season 2 In season 2 of Down and Back: Stories From the American Kennel Club Archives, we explored the famed Morris & Essex Kennel Club dog show, the heroic dogs of 9/11, the evolution of an AKC-recognized dog breed, and lots more. Catch up on epsiodes you missed. ‎Down and Back: Dog Stories From the American Kennel Club Archives
8 Podcasts That Will Make You A Better Cat Owner Cat lovers may rejoice as never before have there been so many cat-focused podcasts available for your listening pleasure. Forget about laboriously wading through heaps of articles as you search for the best information about raising your cat. Whether you're looking for training and healthcare tips, curious about feline behavior, or seek advice from fellow cat enthusiasts, Vurbl has got you covered with a curated list of podcasts that are sure to make you a better cat owner. Vurbl Animals: Stories, Training & Pet Health
Helpful Podcasts About Training Your Dog Did quarantine inspire you to get a new puppy? Is your dog chasing the Amazon delivery driver? Well, look no further because here at Vurbl we curated a playlist of eight podcasts dedicated to how to train your furry best friend. Featured in this playlist is a selection of helpful episodes from the Oh Behave podcast and The Dog's Way podcast. Good luck with training your four-legged friend! Vurbl Animals: Stories, Training & Pet Health

All "Birds" Audio

Where'd all my Vultures go? They may not be the prettiest bird flapping about, but the humble vultures plays an incredibly important role in their ecosystem, performing waster removal, disease reduction and recycling nutrients back into the food chain.Sadly though, vultures are in trouble, having seen a 90% reduction in their population in recent years. To find out more about these fascinating birds, and learn what's killing them all in one handy 30 minute episode.To support Bird of the Week and gain access to our second podcast, What's up with that's Bird's Name? click on through to Patreon: www.patreon.com/birdoftheweekWant birds in your inbox? Drop me a line at weekly.bird@outlook.com and I'll hook you up with a free weekly bird.Would you like some bird art in your life? Then visit Seni Illustration for some bespoke bird art: https://www.seniillustrations.com/Notes:Old World Vultures: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_World_vultureNew World Vultures: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_World_vultureConvergent evolution: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convergent_evolutionVulturine Guineafowl: https://ebird.org/species/vulgui1Vulturine Parrot: https://ebird.org/species/vulpar1Highest flying bird: https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/wilson/v086n04/p0461-p0462.pdfWhy do vultures have bald heads?: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0306456508000107Circling vultures: https://www.audubon.org/news/a-closer-look-how-vultures-lazily-circle-air-1Vulture population collapse: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/06/hooded-vultures-extinction-africa-mass-poisoning
Murray-Darling Basin Bird Breeding Bonanza The Murray-Darling Basin is an important ecosystem in Australia that supports thousands of birds and this year there has been a bird breeding boom, thanks to a couple of floods. This is the first time in nearly a decade that there has been a breeding event on this scale. It means many birds have had a vital boost to their population. Join me to find out more.Special thanks to the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment for providing information and a fact check on this episode. To support Bird of the Week and gain access to our second podcast, What's up with that's Bird's Name? click on through to Patreon: www.patreon.com/birdoftheweekWant birds in your inbox? Drop me a line at weekly.bird@outlook.com and I'll hook you up with a free weekly bird.Would you like some bird art in your life? Then visit Seni Illustration for some bespoke bird art: https://www.seniillustrations.com/Notes:Murray-Darling Basin: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darling_RiverWater bird baby boom: https://www.awe.gov.au/water/cewo/media-release/waterbird-baby-boom-expected-early-2022Australian White Ibis: https://ebird.org/species/ausibi1?siteLanguage=en_AU#:~:text=Common%20white%20and%20black%20ibis,its%20habit%20of%20scavenging%20food.Straw-necked Ibis: https://ebird.org/species/stnibi1?siteLanguage=en_AURoyal Spoonbill: https://ebird.org/australia/species/royspo1/AU-VIC-GGEAustralian Pelican: https://ebird.org/species/auspel1?siteLanguage=en_AUIntermediate Egret (I say Heron in the ep, but I mean Egret): https://ebird.org/species/integr?siteLanguage=en_AUBin Chicken song (explicit): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mO-OpFjHRbE&ab_channel=VanVuurenBrosPelican eats pigeon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sTUSnUgDXI&ab_channel=Videoss4FunLa Nina: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Ni%C3%B1aCommonwealth Environment Water Office: https://www.awe.gov.au/water/cewoMurray-Darling Local Engagement Officers: https://www.awe.gov.au/water/cewo/local-engagementStay up to date on the birds CEWH twitter: https://twitter.com/theCEWH
Magpies are murder birds, change my mind There are few Australian birds as famous as the Magpie. They are famous/infamous for exactly two things:  their beautiful song and their murderous nature. Most people love them, some people loath them. Today I am joined by our old friend Bradly, an avid Magpie hater, as we try to learn something more about this famous bird and see if we can't spread the bird love.To support Bird of the Week and gain access to our second podcast, What's up with that's Bird's Name? click on through to Patreon: www.patreon.com/birdoftheweekWant birds in your inbox? Drop me a line at weekly.bird@outlook.com and I'll hook you up with a free weekly bird.Would you like some bird art in your life? Then visit Seni Illustration for some bespoke bird art: https://www.seniillustrations.com/NotesThe Australian Magpie - https://ebird.org/species/ausmag2?siteLanguage=en_AUMagpie attacks cyclist - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yj9O6tyKK-o&ab_channel=NewsflareOnline Magpie data base - https://www.magpiealert.com/Do eyes on a helmet work? - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGGTcYfrEZU&ab_channel=MichaelBillingsMagpie court - https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/news/2019/04/here-are-4-things-you-definitely-didnt-know-about-aussie-magpies/?fbclid=IwAR03nJ8lBn1btaXccEqcPhihXm0TXHtfQFV5TyoWMiWIeOm2lgW9Uvr4tC8
The Great Auk Last time we met the Penguins, and learned that they are almost totally confined to the Southern Hemisphere. Despite how perfect it would be, there are no Penguins in the Artic. But did you know, Penguins were named after a now extinct northern dwelling bird, the Great Auk? So, what was this bird's deal and where did they go? Great questions, and as always I have the answers. Join me for a romp to the past and the far north and we'll learn a thing to two.To support Bird of the Week and gain access to our second podcast, What's up with that's Bird's Name? click on through to Patreon: www.patreon.com/birdoftheweekWant birds in your inbox? Drop me a line at weekly.bird@outlook.com and I'll hook you up with a free weekly bird.Would you like some bird art in your life? Then visit Seni Illustration for some bespoke bird art: https://www.seniillustrations.com/Notes:Catch up on the Penguin background: https://www.buzzsprout.com/1733312/10464354-penguin-extravaganzaGreat Auk: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_aukConvergent evolution: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convergent_evolutionCommon Eider: https://birdoftheweek.home.blog/2020/01/14/bird-88-common-eider/The Little Ice Age: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Ice_Age
Penguin Extravaganza! Penguins are one of the least bird-like birds getting around. We're told we should never judge a fish by its ability to fly, but this is a bird that wants to be judged by its ability to swim. Where the heck did Penguins come from, why did they abandon the sky and how do they stand on ice all day without getting frost bite? These are all questions, and if you join me on this journey you might even get a couple of answers.To support Bird of the Week and gain access to our second podcast, What's up with that's Bird's Name? click on through to Patreon: www.patreon.com/birdoftheweekWould you like some bird art in your life? Then visit Seni Illustration for some bespoke bird art: https://www.seniillustrations.com/Notes:Counter-current heat exchange: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countercurrent_exchangeCountershading camouflage: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countershading
The Great Feather Heist Part II One summer night in June 2009, Edwin Rist broke into the Tring natural history museum and stole nearly 300 preserved birds worth some quarter of a million pounds. Join us for the second part of our story as we go through the details of how Edwin committed his heist, was eventually caught and then how the court case shook out. It is one wild ride, so strap yourself in.This story was brought to public attention by Kirk Wallace Johnson in his amazing book, The Feather Thief: https://www.penguin.com.au/books/the-feather-thief-9780099510666To support Bird of the Week and gain access to our second podcast, What's up with that's Bird's Name? click on through to Patreon: www.patreon.com/birdoftheweekWould you like some bird art in your life? Then visit Seni Illustration for some bespoke bird art: https://www.seniillustrations.com/NotesAlfred Russel Wallace: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Russel_WallaceWallace's Standardwing: https://ebird.org/species/walsta2Buy your own glass cutter: https://www.mitre10.com.au/supercraft-glass-cutter-diamond-180mmSir Simon Baron-Cohen: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Baron-CohenGibson court case: https://www.iol.co.za/news/world/grave-robbers-caught-after-posing-for-photos-56637Rist court case: https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-14352867
The Great Feather Heist Part I One summer night in June 2009, Edwin Rist broke into the Tring natural history museum and stole nearly 300 preserved birds worth some quarter of a million pounds. How he pulled off this crime, what motivated him, and how he was caught is one wild story. Join us for part one of this story as we lay the ground work and explain how some quirks of history lead to this crime.This story was brought to public attention by Kirk Wallace Johnson in his amazing book, The Feather Thief: https://www.penguin.com.au/books/the-feather-thief-9780099510666To support Bird of the Week and gain access to our second podcast, What's up with that's Bird's Name?, click on through to Patreon: www.patreon.com/birdoftheweek Would you like some bird art in your life? Then visit Seni Illustration for some bespoke bird art: https://www.seniillustrations.com/ NotesBirds:Spangled Cotinga: https://ebird.org/species/spacot1Red-ruffed Fruitcrow: https://ebird.org/species/rerfru1Resplendent Quetzal: https://ebird.org/species/resque1?siteLanguage=en_AUSuperb Bird-of-Paradise: https://ebird.org/species/vosbop1/King Bird-of-Paradise: https://ebird.org/species/kbopar1Feather Trade: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plume_huntingSalmon flies: https://www.google.com/search?q=salmon+flies&tbm=isch&ved=2ahUKEwiFm4GOi9z2AhWek9gFHSjVB_kQ2-cCegQIABAA&oq=salmon+fl&gs_lcp=CgNpbWcQARgBMgUIABCABDIFCAAQgAQyBQgAEIAEMgUIABCABDIFCAAQgAQyBQgAEIAEMgUIABCABDIFCAAQgAQyBQgAEIAEMgUIABCABDoECAAQQzoGCAAQBxAeOggIABCABBCxA1CpBljZB2DuF2gAcAB4AIABtwGIAfcDkgEDMC4zmAEAoAEBqgELZ3dzLXdpei1pbWfAAQE&sclient=img&ei=wf46YsW2D56n4t4PqKqfyA8&bih=714&biw=1536&hl=enGeorge Mortimer Kelson: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_KelsonLionel Walter Rothschild: https://www.lindahall.org/lionel-walter-rothschild/  Tring Natural History Museum: https://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/tring.html
Avian Sugar Junkies Ever wanted to know everything there is know about Hummingbirds? Good news, this is  your one-stop shop for all things humming. Notes:Buff-tailed Sicklebill: https://ebird.org/species/butsic1 Sword-billed Hummingbird: https://ebird.org/species/swbhum1Tooth-billed Hummingbird: https://ebird.org/species/tobhum1Marvelous Spatuletail: https://ebird.org/species/marspa1Ruby-throated Hummingbird: https://ebird.org/species/rthhum?siteLanguage=en_AULove your weekly bird (delivered on a non-weekly basis), then why not consider supporting the show and getting access to our second podcast all about how birds get their names. Find out more at Patreon: www.patreon.com/birdoftheweekFancy getting some avian artwork to liven up your home, check out Seni Illustrations: www.seniillustrations.com
A Special Announcement We interrupt your normal podcast to bring you a special announcement. Bird of the Week is changing how it is delivered. Too many people want birds and we've outgrown our old email server. The Weekly Bird is switching to a new provider, but sadly such services don't come cheap. To help cover some costs Bird of the Week now has a patreon page. If you love your weekly bird and would like to help us so we don't accidentally bankrupt ourselves sending whimsical bird emails, they click on over. I would be forever grateful, and as a special thank you, you will also get access to a special patreon only second podcast -- What's Up With That Bird's Name. Each episode will look at a bird and ask the question how did it end up with the name it has. We'll learn some Latin, some natural history, and discover that many birds are very poorly named. A free taste of the show on the Australia Magpie follows this special announcement.And hey, I get it, signing up for an ongoing contribution may not be everyone's thing, so if you'd like to say a one off thank you for the birds, that would be swell too, and I have set up a Ko-Fi page as well.Thanks for listening, thanks for reading, and thanks for sharing. I really do appreciate it.Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/birdoftheweek Ko-Fi: https://ko-fi.com/birdoftheweek
Migration Part II Last time we learned about how birds preform their great feats of migration. This week we learn about the long scientific history and the many experiments ornithologists conducted to discover the truth of how they do. From birds on the moon and sleeping under frozen ponds to satellite tracking, we've come a long way with our science. Join me as we retrace the theories.Also see if you can spot the places that were re-recorded...NOTESBirds on the Moon: https://www.wired.com/2014/10/fantastically-wrong-scientist-thought-birds-migrate-moon/Ain't no air in space: https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20160419-the-victorians-who-flew-as-high-as-jetsHibernating Swallows: https://press-files.anu.edu.au/downloads/press/n5194/html/11_green.xhtml?referer=&page=15 Common Poorwill: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_poorwillZugunruhe: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZugunruhePfeilstorch: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PfeilstorchHans Mortensen: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hans_Christian_Cornelius_MortensenHerodotus and crocodiles: https://books.google.com.au/books?id=_whgJIh_u9gC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA4&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=falseFor a detailed history on the history of the science around avian hibernation I recommend Tim Birkhead's study The Wisdom of Birds.
The Heck's ... Intelligence? From language and tool use, to social learning and trickery, there's almost no limit to the fancy feats of avian mental gymnastics. Can they beat you at chess, can they fill out your tax return? Probably not, but join me as we go on a romp to find out just how smart birds can be.
A Tale of Two Islands Thanks to their isolation and unique conditions, islands tend to boast a wide array of biodiversity found nowhere else on earth. But while this makes them special places, it also makes them vulnerable to outside influence. Many island dwelling birds across the globe are at risk of extinction. In this episode we'll look at a two islands, Guam and Mauritius, we'll find out what makes them so fragile, see what happens when things go wrong, but also see that we can always chart a path back to recovery.
The Tristan Albatross On a windswept, rain-drenched spit of land in the Atlantic Ocean lives the Tristan Albatross. They're a majestic bird that has landed itself in a spot of bother. Join me as we find out what makes these giant birds special, learn how a hoard of mice has pushed them to the edge of extinction, and meet the fine folks working to save them.And hey, if you've got a spare penny to help out a bird in need why not flap over to https://www.goughisland.com/ and show these birds some love.
The Birds-of-Paradise In New Guinea there is a family of birds that has captured the imagination of naturalists and ornithologists for hundreds of years. They are the Birds-of-Paradise, and when it comes to sheer beauty they are unrivalled in avian world. Not only are they beautiful, but they possess feathers that other birds just don't have: crests, epaulets, flank plumes and tails so exaggerated as to make a Peacock blush. Yet, it has only been in recent years that we have come to understand how these birds use their feathers, and what forces drove them to become so splendid. Join me as we crack the mystery and explore the most remarkable family of birds on earth.
The Lost Birds-of-Paradise Today we know of 42 Birds-of-Paradise, but if we went back to 1930, there were nearly 60 in the family. So where did those 20 or so birds go? They are sometimes known as the Lost Birds-of-Paradise, and still today they're a bit of a mystery. In this week's episode we're going to meet a couple, find out where they went and try to get to the bottom of these forgotten members of this most stunning family.
How Many Birds Are There? Take a step out your front door and you'll be instantly confronted with many species of bird. But have you ever wondered, just how many different ones are there. Simple enough questions, just grab a clipboard and start counting... Except no. It turns out this is one of the trickiest problems in biology, and isn't helped by the fact that we don't even have a consistent definition for a species is. This week we're going to dive in and try to untangle this problem, and see if we can't come up with a count of just how many birds are in this big old  world. Or maybe we'll get side-tracked along the way. Who can say?
How Do Birds Get Their Names? The fact that birds have names is an incredibly handy thing. Instead of just pointing and making a grunting noise every time a pretty bird flies by we can label it with a name, which is ever so frightfully convenient. But how do birds get their names? This there some mysterious bird naming authority? Do they have rules? Can they be broken? Is there any controversy? Well, the answer to all of those questions is yes. And in this episode I would like to take you on journey through the strange world of bird naming conventions that you didn't even know existed.
Pigeons Are Disgusting, Change My Mind There is maybe no bird more polarising than the pigeon. While some people (me) look at these city-dwelling birds and see perfection in avian form, other (wrong) people see disgusting sky rats. Today, I've invited two friends to join me in conversation to see if I can turn a pigeon hater into a pigeon lover.NotesOur friend the Rock DoveSquabPigeons can identify cancerPigeons can (sorta) readPigeons and sea search and rescueProject PigeonB. F. Skinner and gamblingOther B. F. Skinner experimentsCher AmiJacobin PigeonsEnglish PouterFrill BackSaxony Fairy Swallow
The Six Birds of Christmas The 12 Days of Christmas is an old yuletide favourite, doubly so because of all the birds in its lyrics. But the history of this song is rather long and complex. Just why is that Partridge in a pear tree, and what even is a Calling Bird? Join me this festive season as we break down some birds and get to the bottom of this old, folk carol.NotesFrank Kelly's The 12 Days of ChristmasThe Greek Myth of PerdixBresse GauloiseTheme music: Jingle Bells, by Scott Holmes Music
The Heck's Migration? We all know that birds fly south for the winter ... unless you're in the southern hemisphere, then they fly north. But for for a migrating bird it isn't a simply case of flying from A to B.  A bird not only has to find its way but build up the strength to make marathon flights, and no two birds perform their migration in the same way. So join me this week as in dig into one of the most remarkable bird behaviour. NotesThe  world's largest dyke: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saemangeum_Seawall Operation Migration: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_MigrationNo fish besmirches my brand: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4pxLHG0Wzs&ab_channel=BBCEarth
The Heck's a Bird? Just what is a bird? We're going on a romp to Bavaria to find out.
The Heck's a Feather? What is a feather and what can it do? Spoiler alert, it's a lot more than just flying.
The Heck's a Bird? Part II Last time we asked 'what is a bird'? This time we're going even deeper. We're taking a tour of the 10,000 species of birds flip-flappin' their way  around this planet.
The Heck's a Nest? Just what is a nest and why do birds make them? Join us as we explore the strange world of avian construction.
Island Bird Birds come in all shapes and sizes, but once a bird gets on an island all bets are off. They are a hotbed of avian biodiversity, and in this episode we'll find out just what exactly it is about tiny spits of land surrounded by deadly, deadly ocean that causes birds to become radically different from their continental cousins.
1955 - Word From The Meadowlark - A Wonder World Of Bird Calls - Past Daily Weekend Gallimaufry - Sounds Of Our Times A Meadowlark in 1955 - I was serious - it really IS about bird calls.




NBC Radio - Mary Merryfield and birds - June 15, 1955 - Gordon Skene Sound Collection -


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Birds this weekend; specifically, The Meadowlark - primarily, the mid-west - most importantly, from 1955.

In the 1950s, when tape recorders flooded the consumer market, it created a whole host of areas of interest. In my years of acquiring collections, from radio stations and via other collectors, to hobbyists and to garage sales, the spectrum of what became preserved on tape was vast and ran the gamut from the usual (birthdays, house parties, Bar Mitzvahs, testimonials, memorials) to the arcane (trains, weather, atmosphere, ham radio, wild and domesticated animals). It seemed, everyone who plunked down a certain amount of money and bought one of those back-breaking "portable" tape machines was well on their way to become a chronicler of day-to-day life on Planet Earth. One of the biggest endeavors was that of the bird-call recordist. Whole issues of High-Fidelity magazines were devoted to getting "'the most out of your tape recorder" and invariably, there was a section devoted to recording bird calls. It was an art form and it required the patience of a Trappist Monk. Setting up a portable studio in the wilds, with highly directional microphones poised to capture anything with a beak.

And the phenomenon of recording bird calls was very big in the early-late 1950s, all the way to the 1960s and the advent of home stereo. Ironically, many of these recordings captured birds and some species which have become extinct and are no longer with us - in a strange way, capturing for posterity something not destined to stay with us for the long haul.

But the other thing, as is evidenced by this segment of a radio series for NBC; it captured a certain bucolic nostalgia in words and sounds that are almost instantly evocative, even listening some 65 years later. An eerie and compelling link to a past you may never have been part of, or even around for the first time.

But let's don't forget, the show is dedicated to the lowly Meadowlark and its place in the vast expanse of open prairie in the Mid-West of 1955.

Give it five minutes.