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Radio

All Audio
Updated On: Aug 15, 2022
Total Stations: 2,536
Total Audio Titles: 79,224

Popular "Radio" Stations

Dragnet the 50's Radio Show | Old Time Radio Show | Audio Dragnet is one of the most famous and influential police procedural dramas in media history. The podcast portrays a series of real-life cases and investigations that were conducted during the 1950s in Los Angeles. All of the stories are told through the point of view of the fictional character of detective Joe Friday together with his partners in the Los Angeles Police Department. The program became so popular because it portrayed the police and investigative work as dangerous and heroic.

The producer, writer, and host of the podcast is Jack Webb who died in 1982. The podcast was then remade into a series as well as into a movie that was aired by NBC. The podcast and show felt so realistic because of its iconic beginning which stated: "Ladies and gentlemen, the story you are about to hear is true. Only the names have been changed to protect the innocent."

Listen to Dragnet the 50's Radio Show Old Time Radio on Vurbl. As you enjoy Dragnet the 50's Radio Show, keep in mind that you can easily make snippets of your favorite moments to save to your station or share with friends and family. You can even make Dragnet the 50's Radio Show playlists of your favorite episodes, quotes and moments from this timeless era of radio. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Dragnet the 50's Radio Show on the fly.
The Whistler | Old Time Radio Show | Audio Listen to old time radio, The Whistler, now!

Listen to The Whistler Old Time Radio on Vurbl. As you enjoy The Whistler, keep in mind that you can easily make snippets of your favorite moments to save to your station or share with friends and family. You can even make The Whistler playlists of your favorite episodes, quotes and moments from this timeless era of radio. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save The Whistler on the fly.
Richard Diamond, Private Detective - Single Episodes | Old Time Radio Show | Audio Listen to episodes of the classic crime drama "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" as Dick Powell masterfully portrays the witty, singing private detective. Written for radio by Blake Edwards, follow Richard Diamond on his many adventures as he escapes death while solving client cases. Finish off each episode listening to Diamond sing soulfully at a piano. Tune in to hear episodes of "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" which originally aired in 1949 on NBC Radio.

Listen to Richard Diamond, Private Detective - Single Episodes Old Time Radio on Vurbl. As you enjoy Richard Diamond, Private Detective - Single Episodes, keep in mind that you can easily make snippets of your favorite moments to save to your station or share with friends and family. You can even make Richard Diamond, Private Detective - Single Episodes playlists of your favorite episodes, quotes and moments from this timeless era of radio. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Richard Diamond, Private Detective - Single Episodes on the fly.
Golden Classics Great Radio Shows BEST of the Golden Age of Radio encompassing Music, Comedy, Suspense, Westerns, Crime and more!
Boston Blackie | Old Time Radio | Old Time Radio Show | Audio Boston Blackie is a fictional character who has been on both sides of the law. Originally created by author Jack Boyle, he was a safecracker; a hardened criminal who had served time in a California prison. It was adapted into a radio show, a TV show, and a movie. Initially, friction surfaced in the relationship between Blackie and Farraday, but as the series continued, Farraday recognized Blackie's talents and requested assistance. Blackie dated Mary Wesley and for the first half of the series, his best pal Shorty was always on hand.
The Boston Blackie radio series starred Chester Morris and began June 23, 1944 on NBC as a summer replacement for The Amos 'n' Andy Show. Sponsored by Rinso, the series continued until September 15 of that year. On April 11, 1945, Richard Kollmar took over the title role in a radio series. Over 200 episodes of this series were produced between 1944 and October 25, 1950.

Listen to Boston Blackie | Old Time Radio Old Time Radio on Vurbl. As you enjoy Boston Blackie | Old Time Radio, keep in mind that you can easily make snippets of your favorite moments to save to your station or share with friends and family. You can even make Boston Blackie | Old Time Radio playlists of your favorite episodes, quotes and moments from this timeless era of radio. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Boston Blackie | Old Time Radio on the fly.
Archie Andrews | Old Time Radio Show | Audio Broadcast History :

May 31 - December 24, 1943
Blue Network.
Five times a week, 15 minute strip show.
As of October 1st, became a weekly 25 minute series.
Friday at 7:05pm

January 17 - June 2, 1944
Mutual. 15m, daily at 5:15pm

June 2nd, 1945 - September 5th, 1953
NBC. 30m, Saturdays at 10:30am
Swift and Company


Cast :

Charles Mullen, Jack Grimes, Burt Boyar as Archie Andrews
Bob Hastings as Archie during the NBC run.
Harlan Stone and Cameron Andrews as Jughead Jones
Rosemary Rice as Betty Cooper
Gloria Mann and Vivian Smolen as Veronica Lodge
Alice Yourman and Arthur Kohl as Mary and Fred Andrews
Paul Gordon as Reggie Mantle
Arthur Maitland as Mr. Weatherbee

Announcer : Bob Sherry
Music : George Wright
Produceer : Kenneth W. MacGregor
Sound Effects : Agnew Horine

(Sourced: Free OTR Shows)

Listen to Archie Andrews Old Time Radio on Vurbl. As you enjoy Archie Andrews, keep in mind that you can easily make snippets of your favorite moments to save to your station or share with friends and family. You can even make Archie Andrews playlists of your favorite episodes, quotes and moments from this timeless era of radio. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Archie Andrews on the fly.
X Minus One - Single Episodes | Old Time Radio Show | Audio X MINUS ONE


X Minus One aired on NBC from 24 April 55 until 9 January 58 for a total of 124 episodes with one pilot or audition story. There was a revival of the series in 1973 when radio was attempting to bring back radio drama and it lasted until 1975. The show occupied numerous time slots through out its run in the 50's and thus was never able to generate a large following.

X Minus One was an extension of Dimension X which aired on NBC from 1950-51. The first fifteen scripts used for X Minus One were scripts used in the airing of Dimension X; however, it soon found its own little niche. The stories for the show came from two of the most popular science fiction magazines at the time; Astounding and Galaxy. Adaptations of these stories were performed by Ernest Kinoy and George Lefferts. They even wrote a few original stories of their own. The writers of the magazine stories were not well known then but now are the giants of today. These stories came from the minds of Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, and Poul Anderson to name a few.

This series has survived from its original airing in high quality to be enjoyed today.

NOTE: Updated with Version 3 files (14-May-2011).

From the Old Time Radio Researcher's Group. See "Note" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

Listen to X Minus One - Single Episodes Old Time Radio on Vurbl. As you enjoy X Minus One - Single Episodes, keep in mind that you can easily make snippets of your favorite moments to save to your station or share with friends and family. You can even make X Minus One - Single Episodes playlists of your favorite episodes, quotes and moments from this timeless era of radio. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save X Minus One - Single Episodes on the fly.
New Adventures of Nero Wolfe | Old Time Radio | Old Time Radio Show | Audio Nero Wolfe first appeared on radio on July 5, 1943 on the NBC Blue Network in The Adventures Of Nero Wolfe. This series didn't last long and starred Santos Ortega as Wolfe and Luis Van Rooten as Archie.

The second series was during 1945 on the Mutual network in The Amazing Nero Wolfe. This lasted only until December 15, 1946 and starred Francis X. Bushman and Elliot Lewis as Archie.

The third series was known as The New Adventures of Nero Wolfe. Starting on October 20, 1950 it lasted only until April 27, 1951. It starred Sidney Greenstreet as Nero Wolfe. The part of Archie was played by Lawrence Dobkin for the first twelve shows. Gerald Mohr took over for the next four shows after making a guest appearance in the twelfth show. Harry Bartell was Archie for the remainder of the series.

Listen to New Adventures of Nero Wolfe | Old Time Radio Old Time Radio on Vurbl. As you enjoy New Adventures of Nero Wolfe | Old Time Radio, keep in mind that you can easily make snippets of your favorite moments to save to your station or share with friends and family. You can even make New Adventures of Nero Wolfe | Old Time Radio playlists of your favorite episodes, quotes and moments from this timeless era of radio. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save New Adventures of Nero Wolfe | Old Time Radio on the fly.
The Jack Benny Show The Jack Benny Program, starring Jack Benny, was a radio-TV comedy series which ran for more than three decades and is generally regarded as a high-water mark in 20th-century comedy. Jack Benny (February 14, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois â December 26, 1974 in Beverly Hills, California), born Benjamin Kubelsky, was an American comedian, vaudeville performer, and radio, television, and film actor. He was one of the biggest stars in classic American radio and was also a major television personality. Benny was renowned for his flawless comic timing and (especially) his ability to get laughs with either a pregnant pause or a single expression, such as his signature exasperated "Well!". In hand with his dear friend and great "rival" Fred Allen â their long-running "feud" was a famous running gag. Now join us as we return to The Jack Benny Program
filled with laughter and great gags that will keep you coming back for more.
Audio of Have Gun - Will Travel | Old Time Radio Show | Audio Journey to San Francisco, 1875, and meet Paladin; a renegade renaissance man. He's a gentleman, philosopher, and quick on the draw. Join Paladin as he travels from town to town, bringing justice and morality to the Wild West one bullet at a time. Oh, and brace yourself for some ads that could only have been aired in the 1950s.

Listen to Audio of Have Gun - Will Travel Old Time Radio on Vurbl. As you enjoy Audio of Have Gun - Will Travel, keep in mind that you can easily make snippets of your favorite moments to save to your station or share with friends and family. You can even make Audio of Have Gun - Will Travel playlists of your favorite episodes, quotes and moments from this timeless era of radio. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Audio of Have Gun - Will Travel on the fly.

Popular "Radio" Playlists

The Best Episodes of The Aldrich Family | Old Time Radio Here in the fictional town of Centerville, U.S.A lives the Aldrich family. Sam and Alice Aldrich’s son Henry can’t seem to go a day without landing himself in some misadventure. Whether it’s being a nuisance to his older sister Mary, getting into trouble with his best pal Homer, or struggling to win the affections of girls, there’s always something wacky going on in Henry’s life! Load up this collection of the best episodes of “The Aldrich Family” and follow the hilarious antics of Henry in this old time radio situation comedy. Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio
Best Episodes of Inner Sanctum Mysteries | Old Time Radio Hear a collection of anthologies stories full of mystery, terror, and suspense, paired with a narrator known for his tongue-in-cheek, yet eerily creepy cadence. Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio
Best Episodes of Cinnamon Bear | Old Time Radio Featuring the voices of renowned actors Bud Duncan and Barbara Jean Wong, The Cinnamon Bear is a radio show from the 1930s following the adventures of Judy and Jimmy Barton, with the help of Cinnamon Bear, as they search for their missing Christmas star. Throughout their journey in Maybeland, the twins and Cinnamon Bear interact with many different characters, including Santa Claus, Jack Frost, the Wintergreen Witch, and the Crazyquilt dragon. Other notable voice actors include Gale Gordon and Frank Nelson. Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio
Defining Radio Broadcasts of the 1940s Experience the state of the world through authentic news and theatre illustrating the state of the world in the midst of WWII. This is an audio story of a historical decade. Those living in the 1940s experienced all of the broadcasts in this playlist as the hottest in entertainment and the latest in the news. Engage with historical audio and consider how you may have felt hearing it for the first time in the 40s. Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio
OG of Podcasting! Orson Welles' Iconic Radio Moments Orson Welles is a legend in a league of his own. An American actor, director, screenwriter, and producer, he is known as one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. His first film, "Citizen Kane", consistently ranks as one of the greatest films ever made, which he co-wrote, directed, produced, and starred in. But before all of this, he was a radio giant. In 1938, "The Mercury Theatre on the Air" premiered Welle's radio adaptation of H.G. Wells' "The War of the Worlds", convincing some American listeners to believe that an alien invasion was occurring in New York City. This rather infamous broadcast shot Welles to international notoriety. Before moving to film, he hosted a number of radio shows, ranging from sketch comedy with huge co-stars to suspenseful adaptations of famous novels. Here are Orson Welle's most iconic radio moments. Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio
The Best Episodes of Father Knows Best Join Robert Young, the star of Father Knows Best, in a collection of the best episodes from the show. Get to know breadwinner Jim Henderson, stay-at-home wife Margeret Henderson, and their three children, Betty, Bud, and Kathleen. Listen to the time the Hendersons were visited by an unknown dog or the time they had the worst fishing trip in their lives. These stories, and more, can be found here! Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio
The 10 Best Episodes of Rocky Jordan Rocky Jordan is many things, and a man with consistent good luck is not one of them. There's always a woman, there's always a murder, and there's always a chance that Jordan isn't going to make it out alive. Cairo, Egypt can be an unforgiving place, and the Cafe Tambourine -- the restaurant owned by Rocky Jordan -- seems to be the home of the forgotten men of the world looking for trouble and a drink. Some are even looking for Jordan himself. Join Rocky Jordan as he tries to solve daunting mysteries all over Cairo, dodges dames with an appetite for trouble, and tries not to get snuffed out at every step all while running the Cafe Tambourine with Chris, his trusted bartender, and confidant. Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio
The Top Episodes of The Adventures of Archie Andrews When it comes to Archie Andrews, there's no such thing as a dull day in the town of Riverdale! From trying to win the affections of both Betty and Veronica to spoiling his father's beloved peace and quiet with his best-friend Jughead, Archie just can't keep himself out of trouble. To join the fun, load up this collection of the top episodes of "The Adventures of Archie Andrews" and get ready to giggle alongside your favorite comic characters via old time radio! Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio
Top Ten Radio Episodes of Have Gun - Will Travel Join Paladin—the gentleman gunslinger—as he battles outlaws, monsters, and prejudice in our top ten favorite episodes of Have Gun - Will Travel. Meet some of the series' most colorful characters—from a bumbling English aristocrat to an irate Irish oil baron. Listen as Paladin tests his talents like never before; teaching a blind man to shoot by earsight and tracking a creature that exists only in legend. Also, he gets into cooking for a bit. Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio
The Best Episodes of The Whistler Listen now to the best of CBS Radio's The Whistler. Twisted tales of crime and punishment from the all-knowing Whistler were broadcast in the 1940s and 50s for fans of murder and mystery. The Whistler narrates these chronicles; stories of those who walk by night, as he is privy to the secrets hidden in the hearts of men and women who live their lives in the shadows. From jealous husbands to vengeful ax murderers, supernatural beings, and ancient curses, most stories end in an ironic and grim fate. Follow along to see if guilt and innocence are truly black and white. Vurbl The Best of Old Time Radio

All "Radio" Audio

Moon over Africa 35-03-16 ep01 The Talking Head The 26 episodes follow an expedition led by Professor Anton Edwards as they search for the missing city of Atlantis. They follow the directions of a shrunken head which speaks the ancient language of the people of Atlantis and run into many strange dangers in the African jungle.
Moon over Africa 35-03-23 ep02 The Atlantis Quest The 26 episodes follow an expedition led by Professor Anton Edwards as they search for the missing city of Atlantis. They follow the directions of a shrunken head which speaks the ancient language of the people of Atlantis and run into many strange dangers in the African jungle.
E937: PAT Winlink on a Raspberry Pi - Email Over HF Radio! Tonight I welcome Jason, @KM4ACK onto the stream to walk us through setting up PAT Winlink, which is an app on his Build-a-Pi script, and how to use Winlink over HF with no internet connection.Build A Pi: https://github.com/km4ack/pi-build
E939: 40M FT8 to Japan - Ham Radio DX! FT8 is open to Asia on 40M in the mornings - let's see what contacts we can make!
ICQ Podcast Episode 383 - International Lighthouse & Lightship Weekend 2022 In this episode, Martin Butler (M1MRB) is joined by Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT, Edmund Spicer M0MNG, Ed Durrant DD5LP and Chris Howard M0TCH to discuss the latest Amateur / Ham Radio news. Colin (M6BOY) rounds up the news in brief and in the episode's feature Edmund Spicer M0MNG previews International Lighthouse and Lightships Weekend 2022. We would like to thank our monthly and annual subscription donors for keeping the podcast advert free. To donate, please visit - http://www.icqpodcast.com/donate ARISS contact with Summer Camp students at Kopernik Observatory and Science Center, Vestal, New York, USA A Radio Relic Two New Amateur Radio Bands for Canadian Hams Hams on SOTA Event Help Prevent Major Forest Fire Angola DXpedition Promises People the moon Failure in Launching Indian Schoolgirls’ Ham Satellite NRAO Program to Educate Emerging Generation of Scientists using Amateur Radio QSO Expo Returns for Autumn 2022 Show Remembrance Day Contest AP75PAK Celebrates 75th Anniversary of Pakistan
The latest Spanish news headlines in English: 15th August 2022 AM TRE's Bob James brings us the latest, breaking Spanish news. TRE is the only broadcaster in Spain to produce and broadcast, twice daily its own, in house, Spanish and local news service in English...and we offer this to you as a resource right here, and on the hour at tre.radio. Oh, and don't forget to tune in for an expanded news, on 'Spain Today' week daily at 15.00CET #News #Spain #English
Moving to Spain? What you need to know before you move. Jason Porter of Blevins Franks International Tax and Wealth Management talks to Howard Brereton #Wealth #Tax #WealthManagement #Spain #Expat #Brexit
Episode 413 Connor Black, W4IPC, and CJ Pokowitz, WW0CJ While many of us "old timers" may think we know what drives youth interest in amateur radio, a discussion with Conner Black, W4IPC, and CJ Pokowitz, WW0CJ, today's amateur radio youth leaders, may lead us to believe that old timer "value propositions" for ham radio do not resonate with today's youth.  Join Eric and his guests in this discussion of how to potentially increase our numbers in this QSO Today.
Ham Radio Clubhouse: Tune up those transmitters! Ep 73 Aug 9, 2022 Welcome to the Ham Radio Clubhouse. Tune up those transmitters so we can get you in the log! Hope to see you in the chat and catch us on the air. Want to catch the show on the go? Well now you can, we are now podcasting each episode. Available on your favorite podcast platform. If you would like to buy us a beer:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/w2hrcGuest YouTube channels:Our Channels:Joe - https://www.youtube.com/c/K5YVYAmateurRadioStationShane - https://www.youtube.com/thissideoftheradioDan BeerSnack- https://www.youtube.com/c/DanKD2FMWDon Izzo - https://www.youtube.com/smokesignalsrfSteve - https://www.youtube.com/c/SteveKO4AFLHamRadioDaniel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNcOZ7LUBddxjB0wGMYGcBwMerch Links:Joe - https://shop.spreadshirt.com/k5yvy/allShane - https://thissideoftheradio.myspreadshop.com/Discord Links:K5YVY & Friends - https://discord.gg/8WGfgJWUuTT.O.A.D.S- https://discord.gg/GaHVfUPwvT#hamradio #hamradioclubhouse #W2HRC
Don Woods and James Burton @donwoods and @vincetracy discussing #Heatwaves #HosepipeBans #Reservoirs #energybills #supermarkets #football #manunited #Abba #RickyNelsom #JamesBurton
Hello Mary Lou with Don Woods and James Burton @donwoods and @vincetracy discussing
#Heatwaves #HosepipeBans #Reservoirs #energybills
#supermarkets #football #manunited #Abba #RickyNelsom
#JamesBurton
PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio #1224 PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio Edition #1224

Release Date: August 13, 2022

Here is a summary of the news trending This Week in Amateur Radio. This week's edition is anchored by Terry Saunders, Chris Perrine, KB2FAF, N1KIN, Dave Wilson, WA2HOY, Don Hulick, K2ATJ, Eric Zittel, KD2RJX, Will Rogers, K5WLR, George Bowen, W2XBS, and Jessica Bowen, KC2VWX.

Produced and edited by George Bowen, W2XBS.

Approximate Running Time: 1:30:26

Podcast Download: https://bit.ly/TWIAR1224

Trending headlines in this week's bulletin service:

1. National Radio Astronomy Program Designed to Educate Emerging Generation of Scientists Using Amateur Radio
2. Hampton University Scholarships To Provide Opportunities For STEM Students Using Amateur Radio
3. Upcoming Ham Radio Conventions Emphasize Learning and Youth
4. MFJ Enterprises To Celebrate 50th Anniversary
5. Federal Emergency Management Agency Alerts Broadcasters to Vulnerabilities in EAS Devices
6. FCC Says In A Release To Clean Up Orbital Debris First, Then We Can Plan Factories In Space
7. Russian Space Junk Squalls Are Really Gumming Up the Works for SpaceX and StarLink
8. India Student Built Satellite Suffers A Failed Launch Attempt
9. Amateur Radio Club In Pennsylvania Hits Its 10th Anniversary Aboard The Mars Rover
10. DXpedition To Angola Promises Earth-Moon-Earth Communications
11. Amateurs In France Are Told To Share Their Frequencies During The Upcoming Paris Olympics
12. Amateurs Begin A Radio Preparedness Project In Tripura
13. Cancer Recovery Is The Idea Behind This UK Special Event Station
14. Radio Amateurs of Canada Announces Two New Bands For Canadian Amateurs
15. The New ARRL Radio Lab Inspires Innovation In The Ham Shack, and a new Station - W1HQ
16. Hi-Z Antennas will now be manufactured and distributed by DX Engineering
17. An electronics marketer in New York State faces a nearly $700,000 fine from the FCC
18. International Amateur Radio Union Region One Announces Ham Challenge Winners
19. Norway's Telen newspaper spoke to radio amateurs at the emergency response center at Notodden says NRRL
20. The National Science Foundation awarded a grant of $399,211 to Nathaniel Frissell W2NAF for ionospheric studies
21. Radio seized for interfering with police transmissions in Texas
22. Broadcast from LV18 lightship in Harwich
23. RTTY turns 100
24. Ham radio operators reunite families
25. Local news reports covering ham radio
26. TeaPot special event station is on the air
27. YOTA (Youth On The Air) Summer Camp is on the bands
28. Upcoming Conventions and Hamfests

Plus these Special Features This Week:

* Technology News and Commentary with Leo Laporte, W6TWT, will be here to explain the different digital memory measurement standards.
* Working Amateur Radio Satellites with Bruce Paige, KK5DO - AMSAT Satellite News
* Tower Climbing and Antenna Safety w/Greg Stoddard KF9MP, this week, Greg puts aside his tools and climbing belt for part four of his six part series on how to write a successful public service announcement to promote your clubs upcoming hamfest or special event, to the general public on local broadcast radio stations..
* Foundations of Amateur Radio with Onno Benschop VK6FLAB, this week Onno will explain how you can best play the Microphone Gain Game.
* Weekly Propagation Forecast from the ARRL
* Our own amateur radio historian, Bill Continelli, W2XOY returns with another edition of his summer series Amateur Radio History Headlines. This week, Bill takes us above the fold for what made the amateur radio headlines during the first half-of the nineteen sixties...

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Website: https://www.twiar.net
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/twiari/
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/twiar
RSS News: https://twiar.net/?feed=rss2
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Spotify: https://bit.ly/Spotify-TWIAR
TuneIn: https://bit.ly/TuneIn-TWIAR
Automated: https://twiar.net/TWIARHAM.mp3 (Static file, changed weekly)

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Visit our website at www.twiar.net for program audio, and daily for the latest amateur radio and technology news.

Air This Week in Amateur Radio on your repeater! Built in identification breaks every 10 minutes or less.

This Week in Amateur Radio is heard on the air on nets and repeaters as a bulletin service all across North America, and all around the world on amateur radio repeater systems, weekends on WA0RCR on 1860 (160 Meters), and more.

This Week in Amateur Radio is portable too! The bulletin/news service is available and built for air on local repeaters (check with your local clubs to see if their repeater is carrying the news service) and can be downloaded for air as a weekly podcast to your digital device from just about everywhere, including Acast, Deezer, iHeart, iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, TuneIn, Stitcher, iVoox, Blubrry, Castbox.fm, Castro, Feedburner, gPodder, Listen Notes, OverCast, Player.FM, Pandora, Podcast Gang, Podcast Republic, Podchaser, Podnova, and RSS feeds. This Week in Amateur Radio is also ca
E936: Ham Radio Today - Shopping Deals and Events for July 2022 Here are the links for today's videoR&L Daily Specials: http://hr2.li/5fsa3Oklahoma Ham Holiday: https://hamholiday.com/American Radio Supply Mailer: https://tinyurl.com/2p8jca2zBridgecom Giveaway: https://wn.nr/z8yD5MHam Radio Prep: https://hamradioprep.comCOUPON: jason20BuyTwoWayRadios: http://hr2.li/gnbt01Gigaparts: http://hr2.li/gigapartsSave 5% on various items, coupon: KC5HWBOur Grand Canyon POTA Trip!https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs_Ab58w9LI9ZEC3cfFV6sSnkyr-otPdJEd Fong Antennas:https://grapevineamateurradio.com/collections/radio-gear/products/ed-fong-j-pole-antennas-dual-band-220-and-roll-upJuly Giveaway, GMRS Radios: hr2.li/allthegmrsc
E934: I Have Nothing To Say, So Let's Eat Lunch - A Show About Nothing I have been traveling and planning for the upcoming Hamfest next month, so I don't have a topic for today. Let's have a Show About Nothing. I hope you will join me...
E935: Best Handheld Ham Radio for 2022 - Top 16 HT Ham Radios WATCH THIS! Best Handheld Ham Radio for 2022 - my pick of the Top 16 HT Radios, Handie Talkie, Handheld Transceivers, in the Ham Radio world for 2022.Save 5% on all M&P Coax Products: http://hr2.li/gigaparts(affiliate link)Complete List of Radios in this video: https://www.livefromthehamshack.tv/2022/07/26/best-ht-for-2022/
The Director’s Cut – Show 16 – ‘Reservoir Dogs’ and ‘Snatch’…with TRE’s Allan Tee The Director’s Cut – Show 16 – ‘Reservoir Dogs' and 'Snatch'...with TRE’s Allan Tee
The TRE Bookshow. TRE’s Hannah Murray catches up with top authors, to discuss their latest releases 04/08/22 The TRE Bookshow. TRE’s Hannah Murray catches up with top authors, to discuss their latest releases 04/08/22
Episode 3: ‘The Me Nobody Sees’…a different take on mental health – with TRE’s Selina MacKenzie and guests Episode 3: ‘The Me Nobody Sees’…a different take on mental health – with TRE’s Selina MacKenzie and guests
Men’s Talk 04/08/22 with Hannah Murray and her panel of guests Men’s Talk 04/08/22 with Hannah Murray and her panel of guests
Guy Stanton and Peter Walsh: The Betrayer…with TRE’s Giles Brown Guy Stanton and Peter Walsh: The Betrayer...with TRE's Giles Brown
Brian Clegg: Lightning often strikes twice…with TRE’s Giles Brown Brian Clegg: Lightning often strikes twice...with TRE's Giles Brown
Tony Park and Major General Johan Jooste: Rhino War…with TRE’s Giles Brown Tony Park and Major General Johan Jooste: Rhino War...with TRE's Giles Brown
Xiegu 106 Talk - A Tale Of Three Radios Show Notes (contains affiliate links): Xiegu 106 Talk 
 
On this week's episode of Ham Radio Crash Course, a podcast roughly
based on amateur radio but mostly made up of responding to emails from
listeners, hosted by Josh Nass - KI6NAZ and his reluctant wife, Leah -
KN6NWZ, experimenting with loggers, harsh winter hacks and Xiegu 106 tea. 
 
Have a drink with us! Today, we’re drinking…  Smithwicks and Abnormal 
 
Josh has a short tip with the Ham Radio Minute: Experiment with loggers. 
 
 
Join the conversation by leaving a review on Apple Podcast for Ham Radio Crash Course podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ham-radio-crash-course/id1400794852 and/or emailing Leah@hamtactical.com. Leaving a review wherever you listen to podcasts will help Ham Radio Crash Course reach more hams and future hams and we appreciate it!
 
Preparedness Corner: - Harsh Winter Hacks https://www.reddit.com/r/preppers/comments/wlfzax/harsh_winter_hacks_advice/



Email Correspondent’s Tower: We answer emails with ham radio questions, comments on previous podcasts, T-shirt suggestions and everything in between.
 
Links mentioned in the ECT: 
 
S2 Underground Video - https://youtu.be/DGOyvNLk6Bg
 
Whacker songs: https://youtu.be/c9JCnRHdWy4
 
Portuguese Feast: https://www.heraldnews.com/story/news/local/ojornal/2022/08/05/madeira-feast-back/10252495002/



Show Topic: Xiegu 106 Talk 





Thank you all for listening to the podcast.  We have a lot of fun making it and the fact you listen and send us feedback means alot to us!
 
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The latest Spanish news headlines in English: 12th August 2022 AM TRE's Bob James brings us the latest, breaking Spanish news. TRE is the only broadcaster in Spain to produce and broadcast, twice daily its own, in house, Spanish and local news service in English...and we offer this to you as a resource right here, and on the hour at tre.radio. Oh, and don't forget to tune in for an expanded news, on 'Spain Today' week daily at 15.00CET #News #Spain #English
Ham Radio Clubhouse: Unlicensed Radio Therapy Session Ep 72 Aug 2, 2022 Welcome to the Ham Radio Clubhouse. Come in have a seat, bring your cigar and your favorite beverage. Hope to see you in the chat and catch us on the air. Want to catch the show on the go? Well now you can, we are now podcasting each episode. Available on your favorite podcast platform. If you would like to buy us a beer:https://www.buymeacoffee.com/w2hrcGuest YouTube channels:Our Channels:Joe - https://www.youtube.com/c/K5YVYAmateurRadioStationShane - https://www.youtube.com/thissideoftheradioDan BeerSnack- https://www.youtube.com/c/DanKD2FMWDon Izzo - https://www.youtube.com/smokesignalsrfSteve - https://www.youtube.com/c/SteveKO4AFLHamRadioDaniel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNcOZ7LUBddxjB0wGMYGcBwMerch Links:Joe - https://shop.spreadshirt.com/k5yvy/allShane - https://thissideoftheradio.myspreadshop.com/Discord Links:K5YVY & Friends - https://discord.gg/8WGfgJWUuTT.O.A.D.S- https://discord.gg/GaHVfUPwvT#hamradio #hamradioclubhouse #W2HRC
Amateur Radio Newsline Report 2337 for Friday August 12th, 2022 - STUDENTS' AMATEUR SATELLITE SUFFERS FAILED LAUNCH - ANGOLA DXPEDITION PROMISES AMATEURS THE MOON - CANCER RECOVERY INSPIRES SPECIAL EVENT IN UK - PENNSYLVANIA CLUB MARKS 10TH ANNIVERSARY 'ABOARD' MARS ROVER - ARDC GRANT PROVIDES STEM, TECH SCHOLARSHIPS - IARU REGION 1 ANNOUNCES WINNERS IN 1st HAMCHALLENGE CONTEST - RADIO PREPAREDNESS PROJECT BEGINS IN TRIPURA - HAMS TOLD TO SHARE FREQUENCIES DURING PARIS OLYMPICS - WORLD OF DX - KICKER: WE NEVER SAUSAGE A THINGSCRIPTAUDIO
Amateur Radio Roundtable Aug 8, 2022 Tonight Glen shows us smd soldering, Kathy introduces us to Hambot and how he works. Tom reviews the new Evolve III laptop for $58. plus more..
Teach Politicians to NOT LIE! @vincetracy discussed #socialmedia #TikTok. #passports #cocaine #Hunger #BorisJohnson #Lies #Truth
Teach Politicians to not lie! @vincetracy and Barbara Anne discuss .....I use a bit of social media but don’t use TikTok. For me, it’s always been one for the youngsters. I can’t dance, sing or do backward somersaults or forward ones come to that. TikTok have strict rules too, or so I thought.

The number of passports lost by the Home Office in 2021 amidst the covid catch-up battle
has tripled the amount seen in the previous year.

It has been revealed that HGV driver Craig Heal, who was involved in a traffic accident
last March, had traces of cocaine in his system.

A few weeks ago we were shaken by the alarming figures of hunger in the world. There
have been many headlines warning that hunger now affects 828 million people, an
increase of 150 million since the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic.This is even more
worrying for Latin America and the Caribbean, the region that has suffered the greatest
increase in food insecurity, and in which 60 million people do not have enough food to eat.
Hunger is a gender issue. Globally, about 32% of women are moderately or severely food
insecure, compared to 27.6% of men.

I’m so pleased Boris has been kicked out as Prime Minister. What amazes me is how he
got the job in the first place. The man has cheated and lied through every single job. He
cheats on his wife, has been nicked for breaking covid rules that he put in place – the list
is endless.
The latest Spanish news headlines in English: 11th August 2022 AM TRE's Bob James brings us the latest, breaking Spanish news. TRE is the only broadcaster in Spain to produce and broadcast, twice daily its own, in house, Spanish and local news service in English...and we offer this to you as a resource right here, and on the hour at tre.radio. Oh, and don't forget to tune in for an expanded news, on 'Spain Today' week daily at 15.00CET #News #Spain #English
Afrs 0168 - Downbeat - Freddy Martin first Song Lily Belle The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 171 - Music From America The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 185 - Mail Call - Dinah Shore - Andy Russell 03-06-46 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 0295 - Remember - host Robert Young - first Song String Of Pearls - Glenn Miller. The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 0296 - Remember - host Robert Young - first Song What Is This Thing Called Love The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 154 - Hit Parade - 09-29-45 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 166 - Music For Sunday guest Bing Crosby The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 167 - Music Hall - Bing Crosby - Frank Morgan 02-14-46. The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 0732 - One Night Stand - Jan Savitt first Song Rose Room 09-18-45 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 0870 - One Night Stand - Jimmy Dorsey first Song Let It Snow 01-23-46 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 0871 - One Night Stand - Harry James first Song Jump Sauce 02-10-46. The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs - variety Replacement Ozzie Harriet - Ozzies Good Deed 12-03-44 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 123 - Waltz Time first Song If I Had A Dozen Hearts 02-08-46 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 132 - Family Hour replaced By Harvest Of Stars - Pikes Peak Or Bust - Raymond Massey 01-13-46 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
The latest Spanish news headlines in English: 10th August 2022 AM TRE's Bob James brings us the latest, breaking Spanish news. TRE is the only broadcaster in Spain to produce and broadcast, twice daily its own, in house, Spanish and local news service in English...and we offer this to you as a resource right here, and on the hour at tre.radio. Oh, and don't forget to tune in for an expanded news, on 'Spain Today' week daily at 15.00CET #News #Spain #English
E930: Openspot 4 REVEALED! NEW SharkRF Openspot 4 for 2022! SharkRF Reveals a brand new Openspot 4 and Openspot 4 PRO for 2022. These are some of my favorite hotspots, so let's take a look!Link: https://www.sharkrf.com/products/openspot4This video sponsored by PCBway: https://www.pcbway.com
Afrs 003 - If Freedom Failed - The Pledge - Jeffrey Silver Xx-xx-51 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 001 - If Freedom Fails - A Matter Of Fact - Gregory Peck - Raymond Burr Xx-xx-51 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 002 - If Freedom Fails - The Ball players - James Whitmore Xx-xx-51 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 013 - Great Gildersleeve - Royal Visit 11-21-43 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 016 - Sports Quiz first Question Who Hit Most Home Runs National League. The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 052 - Burns Allen - The Wrecked Car 10-17-44 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 089 - Music America Loves Best first Song I Love Theeich Liebe Dich 02-17-46 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
The latest Spanish news headlines in English: 9th August 2022 AM TRE's Bob James brings us the latest, breaking Spanish news. TRE is the only broadcaster in Spain to produce and broadcast, twice daily its own, in house, Spanish and local news service in English...and we offer this to you as a resource right here, and on the hour at tre.radio. Oh, and don't forget to tune in for an expanded news, on 'Spain Today' week daily at 15.00CET #News #Spain #English
How UK investments are taxed in Spain Brett Hanson of Blevins Franks International Tax and Wealth Management talks to Howard Brereton #Wealth #Tax #WealthManagement #Spain #Expat #Brexit
HRWB 161 - Workbench Roundtable with Dan Quigley, N7HQ, From Flex Radio In this episode we talk with Dan Quigley N7HQ from Flex Radio about the projects on his workbench.  Dan revided a Heathkit SB104 by installing an SDR radio inside, designed custom rack panels for radio testing and talks about remote control of test equipment.
The Honest Majority Always Comes Second @neil colbourne and @vincetracy discuss #Wolverhampton #Council #Taxpayers #Water #TikTok #Cycling #Laws #Justice #Education #UK #Justice
The Honest Majority always comes second! @neil colbourne and @vincetracy discuss #Wolverhampton #Council #Taxpayers #Water
#TikTok #Cycling #Laws #Justice #Education #UK #Justice
From April 1947 The Whistler Episode The Black Book 1947 season, the strange tale of the Black Book

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Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/oldtimeradioforever/support
Petronella Ravenshire: The Human Being Diet…with TRE’s Selina McaKenzie Petronella Ravenshire: The Human Being Diet...with TRE's Selina McaKenzie
The latest Spanish news headlines in English: 8th August 2022 AM TRE's Bob James brings us the latest, breaking Spanish news. TRE is the only broadcaster in Spain to produce and broadcast, twice daily its own, in house, Spanish and local news service in English...and we offer this to you as a resource right here, and on the hour at tre.radio. Oh, and don't forget to tune in for an expanded news, on 'Spain Today' week daily at 15.00CET #News #Spain #English
Barbara Coombes – Women interned in World War Two Sumatra: Faith, Hope and Survival…with TRE’s Selina MacKenzie Barbara Coombes - Women interned in World War Two Sumatra: Faith, Hope and Survival...with TRE's Selina MacKenzie
Hanady Nabut – Mediterranea: A vibrant culinary journey through Southern Europe, North Africa and The Eastern Mediterranean…with TRE’s Selina MacKenzie Hanady Nabut – Mediterranea: A vibrant culinary journey through Southern Europe, North Africa and The Eastern Mediterranean...with TRE's Selina MacKenzie
Louis Bayard: Jackie (Onassis) and me…with TRE’s Selina MacKenzie Louis Bayard: Jackie (Onassis) and me...with TRE's Selina MacKenzie
Samantha Renke: You are the best thing since sliced bread…with TRE’s Selina MacKenzie Samantha Renke: You are the best thing since sliced bread...with TRE's Selina MacKenzie
Afrs 240 - Mystery Playhouse - The Boarder 08-10-46 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 603 - Country Corner first Song Billy Grammer - Wabash Cannonball Xx-xx-65 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 628 - Country Corner first Song Talk Back Trembling Lips - Ashworth Xx-xx-65 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 760 - One Night Stand - Stan Kenton - first Song I Know That You Know 09-27-45. The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 775 - One Night Stand - Gene Krupa - first Song The Old Refrain 01-23-45 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs - Showtime - Dinah Shore 08-18-45 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Marvellous UK Commonwealth Games #TheCommonwealthGames .#BPprofits #fashion #trends #hosepipeban #floods #DianaDors
Marvellous UK Commonwealth Games #TheCommonwealthGames .#BPprofits #fashion #trends #hosepipeban #floods
#DianaDors
PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio #1223 PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio Edition #1223

Release Date: August 6, 2022

Here is a summary of the news trending This Week in Amateur Radio. This week's edition is anchored by Terry Saunders, N1KIN, Dave Wilson, WA2HOY, Rich Lawrence, KB2MOB,
Don Hulick, K2ATJ, Eric Zittel, KD2RJX, Will Rogers, K5WLR, George Bowen, W2XBS, and Jessica Bowen, KC2VWX.

Produced and edited by George Bowen, W2XBS.

Approximate Running Time: 1:41:55

Podcast Download: https://bit.ly/TWIAR1223

Trending headlines in this week's bulletin service:

1. Radio Amateurs of Canada Announces Two New Bands For Canadian Amateurs
2. New Zealand Opens The Six Gigahertz Band For WLAN Use
3. Amateur Radio Digital Communications Grants $99,915 Euros to Finnish Ham Radio Club
4. ARDC Grant Will Allow the Sangamon Valley Radio Club To Sponsor Radio Orienteering Activities
5. FCC Chairwoman Rosenworcel Applauds Introduction of Net Neutrality Legislation
6. Nathaniel Frissel, at University of Scranton Awarded NSF Grant For Ionospheric Research
7. New ARRL Radio Lab Station, W1HQ, Inspires Innovation in the Ham Shack
8. Hams Radio Operators Support American Red Cross in Kentucky Flood Response
9. Young Amateurs Radio Club to Host Inaugural Special Event
10. ARRL New England Division Helps FEMA Test Message Distribution
11. Hi-Z Antennas Will Now Be Manufactured By DX Engineering
12. Polish Amateur Radio Union Invites All Amateurs To Participate In Special Event
13. Amateur Radio Provided Communications For The Ironman Lake Placid Triathlon
14. Electronics Marketer In New York Faces Nearly $700,000 Fine From The FCC
15. International Friendship Is Encouraged By The ALARA Contest
16. Worlds Largest Teapot Brews Up A Unique Special Event Station
17. In-Person Hamfest In India Finally Returns After Three Years Of Being Postponed
18. Phoenix UK and DV Scotland Have Merged Their DMR Networks
19. Satellite Built By Indian Schoolgirls To Launch With 75 Experiments
20. A Cross Country Ski Trip Is Planned In The Victorian Alps To Warm Up The Bands
21. Hams on Summits On The Air Event Help Prevent Major Forest Fire
22. Denmark's Regulator EDR notes lack of availability of training
23. Earth just had its shortest day in decades, and it seems to be spinning faster
24. Spaceweather and the Propagation Horoscope
25. Austria: International Youth Day On The Air is out of the ordinary
26. Underwater eruption cutting off communications in Tonga proved continuing importance of shortwave radio
27. Radio broadcasting still crucial in Sarawak Borneo
28. Upcoming conventions and HamFest listing
29. QST now offering a column for radio clubs
30. ARRL Field Day 2022 contacts rise to over 1.2 million
31. Russia posturing to pull out of the International Space Station

Plus these Special Features This Week:

* Technology News and Commentary with Leo Laporte, W6TWT. Leo returns after catching Covid on his vacation, and will spend his segment this week talking about the past and future of technology.
* Working Amateur Radio Satellites with Bruce Paige, KK5DO - AMSAT Satellite News
* Tower Climbing and Antenna Safety w/Greg Stoddard KF9MP, puts aside his tools and climbing belt for Part Three of his series on composing a successful Public Service Announcement to promote your upcoming hamfest or special club event, and getting it on the air on local broadcast outlets.
* Foundations of Amateur Radio with Onno Benschop VK6FLAB, wants to know, what's with the repeater offset again?
* Weekly Propagation Forecast from the ARRL
* The latest from Parks On The Air and Summits On The Air (June 2022 Report) with Vance Martin, N3VEM
* Bill Continelli, W2XOY - The History of Amateur Radio. returns with another edition of his summer series, Amateur Radio History Headlines. This week Bill takes us on a tour of the headlines above the fold during the years 1958 thru 1962.

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Automated: https://twiar.net/TWIARHAM.mp3 (Static file, changed weekly)

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Visit our website at www.twiar.net for program audio, and daily for the latest amateur radio and technology news.

Air This Week in Amateur Radio on your repeater! Built in identification breaks every 10 minutes or less.

This Week in Amateur Radio is heard on the air on nets and repeaters as a bulletin service all across North America, and all around the world on amateur radio repeater systems, weekends on WA0RCR on 1860 (160 Meters), and more.

This Week in Amateur Radio is portable too! The bulletin/news service is available and built for air on local repeaters (check with your local clubs to see if their repeater is carrying the news service) and can be downloaded for air as a weekly podcast to your digital device from just about everywhere, including Aca
Afrs 111 - Radio Theater - Destry Rides Again - James Stewart - Joan Blondell 11-05-45 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 112 - Country Corner first Song Tra Le La Le La Triangle - Patsy Cline Xx-xx-63 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 118 - Music We Love - Gladys Swarthout - Igor Gorin 11-05-45 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 211 - One Night Stand - Glen Gray - first Song A Sure Thing 04-05-44 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 236 - One Night Stand - Russ Morgan - first Song Do You Ever Think Of Me 04-28-44. The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
E929: Ask Me Anything - Ham Radio Livestream We're doing a livestream to just answer questions - why not? Join us at 7pm CDT for tonight's episode.
E927: Yaesu REVEALS the FT-710 AESS HF Ham Radio - NEW for 2022! WOW! Yaesu's 6th radio released since 2020 when the Pandemic started! Let's clear up some mis-information and speculations that were made in some earlier social media posts. Take a look! @HAM RADIO DUDE video - https://youtu.be/GnkQrA1ZRL0 @Yaesu USA Official video - https://youtu.be/STGpsrQnTOY
E928: Ham Radio Today - Discounts and Events for July 2022 Here are the links for today's video!☀️ Evergreen Coupons: https://www.livefromthehamshack.tv/affiliates-and-dealsSave 5% at Gigaparts: http://hr2.li/gigaparts☀️ POTA Plaque Event: https://pota.app/#/plaque☀️ Ham Radio Prep: https://hamradioprep.comCOUPON: jason20☀️ American Radio Supply Mailer: https://tinyurl.com/vefcwrve☀️ Bridgecom Giveaway: https://wn.nr/z8yD5M 👉 👉 MY Amazon Store: https://www.amazon.com/shop/hamradio2.0☀️ As an Amazon Associate, I can earn commissions from qualified items 👉 Jackery Explorer 1000: https://amzn.to/3AElqf0 👉 Jackery Explorer 300: https://amzn.to/3nPctrA 👉 Jackery 100w Solar Panel: https://amzn.to/3Rm4G2c 👉 Devos outdoor Gear: https://www.devosoutdoor.com/discount/jason 👉 Summit Outdoors Gear: https://summitoutdoorsgear.com
Episode 412 Richard Bateman KD7BBC Richard Bateman, KD7BBC, smitten by computers and programming from an early age, used this talent to solve problems.  Combined with an interest in amateur radio, driven by his family, Richard developed Exam Tools amateur radio testing software now used by the majority of volunteer examiners today.  The Covid Pandemic accelerated the evolution of Exam Tools for remote testing. KD7BBC tells the story in this QSO Today.
Afrs 068 Science Magazine Of The Air - Witchcraft 10-28-45 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 071 - Gi Journal - Robert Benchley - Bonita Granville 11-24-44 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 077 - It Pays To BeIgnorant - What Is A Window 07-13-45 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 110 - Music We Love - Gladys Swarthout 09-10-45 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
Afrs 111 - Country Corner first Song Safely In Love Again - Faron Young Xx-xx-63 The biggest names in Hollywood and Broadway recorded for AFRS during the war years, The American Forces Network can trace its origins back to May 26, 1942, when the War Department established the Armed Forces Radio Service (AFRS). The U.S. Army began broadcasting from London during World War II, using equipment and studio facilities borrowed from the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). The first transmission to U.S. troops began at 5:45 p.m. on July 4, 1943, and included less than five hours of recorded shows, a BBC news and sports broadcast. That day, Corporal Syl Binkin became the first U.S. Military broadcasters heard over the air. The signal was sent from London via telephone lines to five regional transmitters to reach U.S. troops in the United Kingdom as they prepared for the inevitable invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. Fearing competition for civilian audiences the BBC initially tried to impose restrictions on AFN broadcasts within Britain (transmissions were only allowed from American Bases outside London and were limited to 50 watts of transmission power) and a minimum quota of British produced programming had to be carried. Nevertheless, AFN programs were widely enjoyed by the British civilian listeners who could receive them, and once AFN operations transferred to continental Europe (shortly after D-Day) AFN were able to broadcast with little restriction with programs available to civilian audiences across most of Europe (including Britain) after dark. As D-Day approached, the network joined with the BBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation to develop programs especially for the Allied Expeditionary Forces. Mobile stations, complete with personnel, broadcasting equipment, and a record library were deployed to broadcast music and news to troops in the field. The mobile stations reported on front line activities and fed the news reports back to studio locations in London.
The Well Appointed Ham Show Notes (contains affiliate links): The Well Appointed Ham  
 
On this week's episode of Ham Radio Crash Course, a podcast roughly
based on amateur radio but mostly made up of responding to emails from
listeners, hosted by Josh Nass - KI6NAZ and his reluctant wife, Leah -
KN6NWZ, Manuals, bad habit preps and the well appointed ham. 
 
Have a drink with us! Today, we’re drinking…  The Bruery Hoppy Belgian Ale 
 
Josh has a short tip with the Ham Radio Minute: Manuals.
 
 
Join the conversation by leaving a review on Apple Podcast for Ham Radio Crash Course podcast at https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ham-radio-crash-course/id1400794852 and/or emailing Leah@hamtactical.com. Leaving a review wherever you listen to podcasts will help Ham Radio Crash Course reach more hams and future hams and we appreciate it!
 
Preparedness Corner: - Bad habits lead late night prepping alone
 
Email Correspondent’s Tower: We answer emails with ham radio questions, comments on previous podcasts, T-shirt suggestions and everything in between.
 
Links mentioned in the ECT: 
 
Mike’s website: https://wx0mik.net/
 
Doug’s SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-380581532
 
HamStudy says not to just use practice exams to study: https://blog.hamstudy.org/2022/08/why-should-i-use-hamstudy-and-not-just-take-practice-exams/



Show Topic: The Well Appointed Ham 





Thank you all for listening to the podcast.  We have a lot of fun making it and the fact you listen and send us feedback means alot to us!
 
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Sports Sitdown Open - will NFL come down on Watson? Hosts Mike Damergis, Scott Taylor and Charles Coplin discuss the Deshaun Watson debacle as the sex-crazed quarterback is given a six-game suspension .

On Monday, Watson was suspended for six games this season for violating the NFL's personal conduct policy in private meetings with massage therapists while he was with the Houston Texans.

The NFL had asked Sue L. Robinson, the former judge hired by the NFL and its players union to decide on Watson's punishment, for a suspension covering the 17-game regular season and the playoffs.
Sports Sitdown Seg 2 Deshaun Watson fallout On Monday, Watson was suspended for six games this season for violating the NFL's personal conduct policy in private meetings with massage therapists while he was with the Houston Texans.
The NFL had asked Sue L. Robinson, the former judge hired by the NFL and its players union to decide on Watson's punishment, for a suspension covering the 17-game regular season and the playoffs.
Sports Sitdown - Notre Dame looking for a home, Cowboys a money-making machine Hosts Mike Damergis, Charles Coplin & Scott Taylor discuss how the Dallas Cowboys named most valuable sports franchise at $7.64 billion. Jerry Jones has said he would never sell the Dallas Cowboys. If he ever changed his mind, Sportico has it valued at $7.64 billion, making it the most valuable franchise across all sports.
The TRE Bookshow. TRE’s Hannah Murray catches up with top authors, to discuss their latest releases 28/07/22 The TRE Bookshow. TRE’s Hannah Murray catches up with top authors, to discuss their latest releases 28/07/22
John W. Arthur – Beer: A global journey through the past and present…with TRE’s Hannah Murray John W. Arthur – Beer: A global journey through the past and present...with TRE's Hannah Murray
The latest Spanish news headlines in English: 5th August 2022 AM TRE's Bob James brings us the latest, breaking Spanish news. TRE is the only broadcaster in Spain to produce and broadcast, twice daily its own, in house, Spanish and local news service in English...and we offer this to you as a resource right here, and on the hour at tre.radio. Oh, and don't forget to tune in for an expanded news, on 'Spain Today' week daily at 15.00CET #News #Spain #English
George Stevens Jr. – My place in the Sun: Life in the Golden Age of Hollywood and Washington…with TRE’s Hannah Murray George Stevens Jr. – My place in the Sun: Life in the Golden Age of Hollywood and Washington...with TRE's Hannah Murray
Steve Nallon: Founding member of the original Spitting Image cast…with TRE’s Hannah Murray Steve Nallon: Founding member of the original Spitting Image cast...with TRE's Hannah Murray
Carrie Frais: #LivingTheDream – Expat life stripped bare…with TRE’s Hannah Murray Carrie Frais: #LivingTheDream – Expat life stripped bare...with TRE's Hannah Murray
Carmen Turner Schott – The mysteries of the Twelfth Astrological House: Fallen Angels…with TRE’s Hannah Murray Carmen Turner Schott - The mysteries of the Twelfth Astrological House: Fallen Angels...with TRE's Hannah Murray
Ali Donnelly – Scrum Queens: The story of Women’s Rugby…with TRE’s Hannah Murray Ali Donnelly – Scrum Queens: The story of Women's Rugby...with TRE's Hannah Murray
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