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Mathematics

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Updated On: Jul 18, 2022
Total Stations: 94
Total Audio Titles: 1,304

Popular "Mathematics" Stations

Breaking Math Podcast Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new!SFTM, our umbrella organization, also has another (explicit) podcast called "Nerd Forensics" all about nerd (and other) culture. Check it out wherever you get podcasts! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support
My Favorite Theorem Join us as we spend each episode talking with a mathematical professional about their favorite result. And since the best things in life come in pairs, find out what our guest thinks pairs best with their theorem.
Now in Android This show gives listeners a quick run-down on things that the Android team has done recently that developers may want to check out. It covers library and platform releases, articles, videos, podcasts, samples, codelabs - whatever seems relevant and interesting for Android developers.

Android’s a big platform and there are many things being released all the time; listen to this podcast to stay up to date on what those things are.
Math & Physics Podcast Two university students in the math and physics program dedicated to spreading our interest in the field to the world!
Advanced Maths by Yschool This is Advanced Maths Podcast by YSchool, an online learning platform for students in India powered by Edusquare . This is hosted by Anand Arora , cofounder of Edusquare. We invite all students across the country to download our app "Yschool Learning App" available free of cost on Android during tough times that will help them in their JEE / NEET preparation.
‎Sum of All Parts Sum of All Parts tells extraordinary stories about the unseen influence that numbers have on the way we think, feel and behave.

Popular "Mathematics" Playlists

Best of STEAM Powered Voices Michele Ong, host of STEAM Powered, is proud to present the Best of STEAM Powered Voices, with fascinating and insightful content from our guests and other brilliant speakers in the extended Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics, and Medical community. STEAM Powered
Deep Dive: Ocean Conservation Learn how we can better protect our seas and marine life with interviews from scientists and other enthusiasts talking all about ocean conservation. Discover the specific challenges that face our oceans and hear about actionable solutions everyone can contribute to. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Deep Dive: Black Holes Enjoy these far-out podcasts talking all about one of the most mysterious areas of astronomy, black holes. Listen to astronomers and other experts talk about the nature of black holes and what we still don't know about them. Learn about this fascinating natural phenomenon with this collection of astronomy podcasts. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Best Science Audio On Vurbl Listen to the weirdest episodes of top science podcasts! Featuring leading experts in biology, psychology, medicine, epidemiology astronomy, computer science, and many disciplines as they share the latest & wildest scientific discoveries and developments. Includes episodes from Weather Geeks, Hidden Brain, Our Epic Ocean, STEAM Powered, and more! Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
The Human Body Listen to some of the best podcasts about anatomy and physiology here! Explore podcasts about how the human brain functions, the sensory organs, diseases, and much more. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Highlights: Agroecology and Climate Change with Dr Anika Molesworth Highlights from STEAM Powered's conversation with Dr Anika Molesworth, Farmer, Scientist, Storyteller, and related topics. STEAM Powered
Highlights: Stem Cell Biology with Rebecca Lim (#1) Highlights from STEAM Powered's conversation with Rebecca Lim, Stem Cell Biologist, and related topics. STEAM Powered
Deep-Sea Mining: A Look At Both Sides of the Issue Deep-sea mining, the removal of valuable minerals from the seabed, is rapidly becoming a reality.
It's an extremely complex topic with a lot to consider. This playlist tries to voice the multiple sides as fairly as possible.
The Deep-Sea Podcast
Unforgettable Moments in Space Exploration From the dawn of time, man has looked towards the stars. Today, exploring them is a reality. From the first Soviet satellite launch, to the first steps on the moon, the challenger explosion and beyond, listen to this curated playlist of unforgettable and fascinating moments throughout the history of space exploration to remind you of the journey thus far, and excite you for where mankind will travel next. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Geography Trivia Geography trivia questions from Barstool Sports' trivia show The Dozen. Watch full episodes at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5noofjAe8o&list=PLq62m2d0BaroV1pT8uo09_MVEc9XjWVlk Best of Barstool Sports

All "Mathematics" Audio

65 - Android 13 Beta 4, Jetpack Compose 1.2 stable, Wear OS, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on Android 13 Beta 4, Predictive back gestures, Jetpack Compose, Wear OS, Text gradients, Large screens, System UI, and more! Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu          Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
[Bite] Documenting Data Science Projects Do you ever find yourself wondering what the data was you used in a project? When was it obtained and where is it stored? Or even just the way to run a piece of code that produced a previous output and needs to be revisited?Chances are the answer is yes. And it’s likely you have been frustrated by not knowing how to reproduce an output or rerun a codebase or even who to talk to to obtain a refresh of the data - in some way, shape, or form. The problem that a lot of project teams face, and data scientists in particular, is the agreement and effort to document their work in a robust and reliable fashion. Documentation is a broad term and can refer to all manner of project details, from the actions captured in a team meeting to the technical guides for executing an algorithm.  In this bite episode of DataCafé we discuss the challenges around documentation in data science projects (though it applies more broadly). We motivate the need for good documentation through agreement of the responsibilities, expectations, and methods of capturing notes and guides. This can be everything from a summary of the data sources and how to preprocess input data, to project plans and meeting minutes, through to technical details on the dependencies and setups for running codes.
Scaling the Internet Do you have multiple devices connected to your internet fighting for your bandwidth? Are you asking your children (or even neighbours!) to get off the network so you can finish an important call? Recent lockdowns caused huge network contention as everyone moved to online meetings and virtual classrooms. This is an optimisation challenge that requires advanced modelling and simulation to tackle. How can a network provider know how much bandwidth to provision to a town or a city to cope with peak demands? That's where agent-based simulations come in - to allow network designers to anticipate and then plan for high-demand events, applications and trends.In this episode of the DataCafé we hear from Dr. Lucy Gullon,  AI and Optimisation Research Specialist at Applied Research, BT. She tells us about the efforts underway to assess the need for bandwidth across different households and locations, and the work they lead to model, simulate, and optimise the provision of that bandwidth across the network of the UK. We hear how planning for peak use, where, say, the nation is streaming a football match is an important consideration. At the same time, reacting to times of low throughput can help to switch off unused circuits and equipment and save a lot of energy.Interview Guest: Dr. Lucy Gullon,  AI and Optimisation Research Specialist from Applied Research, BT.Further reading:BT Research and Development (https://www.bt.com/about/bt/research-and-development)Anylogic agent-based simulator (https://www.anylogic.com/use-of-simulation/agent-based-modeling/)Article: Agent-based modelling (via Wikipedia)Article:Prisoner's Dilemma (via Wikipedia)Article: Crowd Simulation (via Wikipedia)Book: Science and the City  (via Bloomsbury)Research group: Traffic Modelling (via mit.edu)Some links above may require payment or login. We are not endorsing them or receiving any payment for mentioning them. They are provided as is. Often free versions of papers are available and we would encourage you to investigate.Recording date: 5 May 2022Interview date: 27 Apr 2022
Math as Art Jeanne Lazzarini, a math education specialist, shares the connections between math, such as fractals and the golden ratio, and art. These are everywhere--nature, architecture, film and more. She shares hands-on mathematical activities that helped her students see math as an exploration and an art.

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Separation Logic 1 I discuss separation logic, as presented in this seminal paper by the great John C. Reynolds.  I did not go very far into the topic, so please expect a follow-up episode.
64 - Independent versioning of Jetpack Compose libraries, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on Developer-Powered CTS (CTS-D), independent versioning of Jetpack Compose libraries, Google Play: making Play work for everyone, more updates from AndroidX, and more! For links to these items, check out Now in Android #64 on Medium → https://goo.gle/3cfGnD0  Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu          Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
MATHEMATICS EVERYWHERE In today's world, Mathematics plays an integral part in everyone's life. We should be friends with mathematics and not be afraid to learn. Let's go on this quest for learning and let's hope it's a fun- filled journey of learning for all.
MORE ABOUT PROBABILITY Learning about probability is an ongoing process which we all will keep up. Let's understand more about the algebra of probability.
Mathematical Objects: Fingers with Ben Orlin A conversation about mathematics inspired by some fingers. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett, with special guest Ben Orlin. Ben’s new book is Math Games with Bad Drawings.
Episode 77 - Tien Chih Evelyn Lamb: Hello, and welcome to My Favorite Theorem, the math podcast with no quiz at the end. I'm Evelyn lamb, one of your hosts. I'm a freelance math and science writer in Salt Lake City, Utah, currently enjoying very beautiful spring mountains, which my guest and my cohost can see behind me in my Zoom background. And this is my co host.

Kevin Knudson: Hi, I’m Kevin Knudson, professor of mathematics at the University of Florida. My wife and I are off to California this weekend. So, you know, she's she's a book artist, and there's a there's a big biannual, every two years is biannual, right? Or is that semiannual?


EL: Maybe?


KK: Who knows?


EL: Biennial is also a word. Maybe they’re the same word? [Editor’s note: dictionary.com says biannual can mean the same thing as biennial (every two years) or semiannual (twice a year). The Oxford English Dictionary, on the other hand, says biannual means twice a year and biennial means every two years.]


KK: Every two years. Except that this two years is this two years is three years, because two years ago was, well, anyway.


EL: Right.


KK: So yeah, so it's called CODEX, and she is exhibiting there, and I am tagging along because I like Berkeley.


EL: Fun!


KK: And we're going to do stupid things like spend too much for a meal at Chez Panisse.


EL: That sounds great.


KK: Yeah, we're really looking forward to it. So anyway, but let's talk math.


EL: Yes. And we are excited today to be talking with Tien Chih. Tien, would you like to introduce yourself?


Tien Chih: Hi, my name is Tien Chih, and I'm currently an assistant professor of mathematics at Montana State University Billings, which is a comprehensive teaching school in the middle of Montana. But later on this fall, I will be joining the faculty of Oxford College at Emory University. Oxford is college separate from the main campus of Emory that's a small liberal arts spin off, so students can do a small liberal arts experience with the first two years of their undergraduate degree at Emory and then go to the main campus to finish, so I'm really excited for that.


KK: Yeah. And that's that that's a little bit outside of town, right? So Emory itself is in Decatur, correct? And the Oxford College is where? I know it's not right there.


TC: Oxford, Georgia, about a half hour or 45 minutes or so east, I think.


KK: Okay. Nice.


EL: Yeah. Well, I am excited that we got you while you're still in Montana, because I just love having guests who are also in the Mountain Time Zone because that they don't think I'm, you know, a layabout because I never want to do anything before 11am.


KK: This is a common problem we have.


EL: Yeah, I am excited, I'll be going to Glacier, or I'm working on planning a trip to Glacier National Park for this summer, which I know isn't actually that close to Billings, because Montana is enormous. But I think it will be very beautiful. Some of the pictures that you post sometimes are really beautiful with the scenery up there in Montana. I'm sure, maybe you're a little behind us on the spring timeline, but similar mountain beauty.


TC: Yeah, I went to graduate school, actually at the University of Montana in Missoula, which is much closer to Glacier. So while I was a grad student I managed to go up there a couple of times, and you're in for a really good time this summer.


EL: Yeah, I'm excited.


KK: Excellent.


EL: Yeah, well, let's dive into the math. What math would you like to talk about today?


TC: Okay, so my favorite theorem is not exactly a theorem, or is a theorem, depending on your point of view. But my favorite math concept that I'm going to talk about today is mathematical induction. There are a couple of reasons why I chose this. One is that I am a combinatorialist/graph theorist. In our field, we don't have a lot of big foundational theorems or theories. In our line of research, we tend not to build skyscrapers, we tend to sprawl. And so because of that there aren't like these big foundation things, so it's hard to point at, like, one theorem and say this is a key theorem in our discipline, but the idea of induction is always present in our work, and especially in my work. Another reason I like induction is because I do a lot of math outreach kind of things. I'm involved in the Math Circle community quite heavily. I run a student circle here at MSU Billings. And mathematical induction is one of those things that almost all students, even children, intuitively understand. The actual mechanisms and formal logic, of course, is not som
Let's talk about Rust In this episode, I talk briefly about Rust, which uses compile-time analysis to ensure that code is memory-safe (and also free of data races in concurrent code) without using a garbage collector.  Fantastic!  The language draws on but richly develops ideas on ownership that originated in academic research.
Mathematical Objects: Quarto A conversation about mathematics inspired by the game Quarto. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.
[Bite] Documenting Data Science Project Work Do you ever find yourself wondering what the data was you used in a project? When was it obtained and where is it stored? Or even just the way to run a piece of code that produced a previous output and needs to be revisited?Chances are the answer is yes. And it’s likely you have been frustrated by not knowing how to reproduce an output or rerun a codebase or even who to talk to to obtain a refresh of the data - in some way, shape, or form. The problem that a lot of project teams face, and data scientists in particular, is the agreement and effort to document their work in a robust and reliable fashion. Documentation is a broad term and can refer to all manner of project details, from the actions captured in a team meeting to the technical guides for executing an algorithm.  In this bite episode of DataCafé we discuss the challenges around documentation in data science projects (though it applies more broadly). We motivate the need for good documentation through agreement of the responsibilities, expectations, and methods of capturing notes and guides. This can be everything from a summary of the data sources and how to preprocess input data, to project plans and meeting minutes, through to technical details on the dependencies and setups for running codes.
Rerelease - Conceptual Understanding Part 1 By popular demand, we bring you Maths consultant Nadia Abdelal, talking in 2021 about the importance of teaching for conceptual understanding, and why it needs to be extended into secondary classes. This is a must-listen for primary and secondary teachers alike and will hopefully stimulate some real discussion in staffrooms across Australia and the world. It was the first in a 2-part series on conceptual understanding in Mathematics and you can continue our discussion with a dive into teaching algebra for conceptual understanding by going to the episode from March 2021, clicking here https://open.spotify.com/episode/42tZlWUtCozw6wTyHbDNza?si=7c9da64eb9a44914 or waiting until next week, when we will rerelease it.
Contact us at www.calculate.org.au 
Nadia’s website: https://emmaths.com.au
An NCTM article about teaching Maths for conceptual understanding: https://www.nctm.org/Publications/Mathematics-Teaching-in-Middle-School/2018/Vol24/Issue1/Promoting-a-Conceptual-Understanding-of-Mathematics/
Marcus discusses the importance of Context in Mathematics: https://calculate.org.au/2016/02/19/2498/
Jo Boaler highlights that learning number facts is not all about procedure, and in fact a conceptual approach is more effective: https://www.youcubed.org/evidence/fluency-without-fear/
Region-Based Memory Management I discuss the idea of statically typed region-based memory management, proposed by Tofte and Talpin.  The idea is to allow programmers to declare explicitly the region from which to satisfy individual allocation requests.  Regions are created in a statically scoped way, so that after execution leaves the body of the region-creation construct, the entire region may be deallocated.  Type inference is used to make sure that no dangling pointers are dereferenced (after the associated region is deallocated).  This journal paper about the idea is not easy reading, but has a lot of good explanations in and around all the technicalities.  Even better, I found, is this paper about region-based memory management in Cyclone.  There are lots of intuitive explanations of the ideas, and not so much gory technicality.
63 - Android 13 Beta 3, Google Play, Privacy Sandbox DP3, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on Android 13 Beta 3, Google Play, Privacy Sandbox Developer Preview 3, Android Developers Backstage, and more AndroidX releases! Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu          Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
Exploration in Reading Mathematics Lara Alcock of Loughborough University shares what she learned, by tracking eye movements, about how mathematicians and students differ in the ways they read mathematics. She developed a 10-15 minute exploration training, that increases students' comprehension through self-explanation. We also discuss the transition between procedural math and proofs that many students struggle with early in their college careers.

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Games for Math Learning Jon Goga, of Brainy Spinach Math, is using the Roblox gaming platform to bring math learning to kids using something they already enjoy. Along the way, he teaches them some techniques that are useful for mathematicians at any level--breaking down and building up a problem. We also discuss the "inchworm" and "grasshopper" styles of learning. 

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72: The Lifestyles of the Mathematical and Famous (an Interview with Author Robert Black) Robert Black is an author who has written a six-book series about seven influential mathematicians, their lives, and their work. We interview him and his books, and take a peek into the lives of these influential mathematicians.Addendum: Hey Breaking Math fans, I just wanted to let y'all know that the second material science podcast is delayed.[Featuring: Sofía Baca; Robert Black]
73: Materialism: a Material Science Podcast Podcast Episode (Interview with Taylor Sparks) Physical objects are everywhere, and they're all made out of molecules, and atoms. However, the arrangement and refinement of these atoms can be the difference between a computer and sand, or between a tree and paper. For a species as reliant on tool use, the ability to conceieve of, design, create, and produce these materials is an ongoing concern. Since we've been around as humans, and even before, we have been material scientists in some regard, searching for new materials to make things out of, including the tools we use to make things. So what is the difference between iron and steel? How do we think up new things to make things out of? And what are time crystals? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math.This episode is released under a Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) license. More information here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/[Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch; Taylor Sparks]
74: Lights, Camera, Action! (3D Computer Graphics: Part I) The world around us is a four-dimensional world; there are three spatial dimensions, and one temporal dimension. Many of these objects emit an almost unfathomable number of photons. As we developed as creatures on this planet, we gathered the ability to sense the world around us; and given the amount of information represented as photons, it is no surprise that we developed an organ for sensing photons. But because of the amount of photons that are involved, and our relatively limited computational resources, it is necessary to develop shortcuts if we want to simulate an environment in silico. So what is raytracing? How is that different from what happens in games? And what does Ptolemy have to do with 3D graphics? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math.Theme was Breaking Math Theme and outro was Breaking Math Outro by Elliot Smith of Albuquerque.This episode is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license. License information can be found here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/[Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch]
Mathematical Objects: Slinky A conversation about mathematics inspired by a slinky. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.
Episode 76 - Math Students of CSULA Kevin Knudson: Welcome to my favorite theorem, a math podcast with no quiz at the end. I'm Kevin Knudson, professor of mathematics at the University of Florida, and I am joined by your other co-host person.

Evelyn Lamb: Hi, I am Evelyn Lamb, a freelance math and science writer in Salt Lake City, Utah. And I was actually thinking we should have a quiz at the end of this one.


KK: We really should.


EL: It’s just so jam-packed. There's gonna be so many different things floating around. So, like, be prepared…actually don't because we haven't prepared a quiz for you, so we don’t want you to be disappointed.


KK: I’ll start writing the quiz now. Yeah, today we have an interesting new experiment that we're going to try. So Mike Krebs from Cal State University in Los Angeles reached out to us with an idea. Mike, why don't you just introduce yourself and explain?


Mike Krebs: Hi, my name is Mike Krebs. I'm a professor of mathematics at California State University Los Angeles. Graduation is tomorrow, and I think our students have had enough of quizzes, so thank you for passing on the quiz. Yeah, I listen to a lot of podcasts, and my origin story of finding your podcast is sometimes to find a new one, I will go to Wikipedia and click the “random article” button, and then whatever comes up, search to find a podcast on that.


KK: Okay.


MK: I found various things that way like the story of Sylvia Weiner, an octogenarian marathon runner, and so on and so forth. And then one time, I clicked “random article,” and up came a page on differential geometry of surfaces.


KK: Okay.


MK: And one Google Search later, I started screaming at my laptop, “There’s a podcast called My Favorite Theorem!” So, yeah, I discovered that at the time I was teaching, this past semester, a capstone course for our math majors, in which students select a topic and then have to write about it and present about it. And I said, “Oh, I wonder if the good folks at my favorite theorem would be interested in doing something like that with students.” So I recruited some students from that class, as well as a bunch of other students from our university. And here we are now.


KK: All right.


EL: That’s amazing. And so you're mostly graduating seniors about to graduate and you're spending the morning before your graduation with us? I feel so honored.


KK: I really do. This is something else. Yeah.


EL: Well, let's get to it.


KK: We have nine students. And so as Mike pointed out, there are nine factorial or 362,880 possibilities here. And we have chosen one of those orders.


EL: Yes. You know, if you so choose, you can always divide this into tracks and listen to them in every possible order and then get back to us and tell us what the optimal order would have been. But for now, it's the order in which they appeared on my Zoom screen. So our first guest today is Pablo Martinez Gutierrez. Great to have you. Would you like to say a little bit about yourself and let us know your favorite theorem?


Pablo Martinez Gutierrez: Hi, thank you for having me on the show. Yes, I'm Pablo. I'm currently a math undergraduate at Cal State LA, hoping to complete my Bachelor's, not this semester, but hopefully next fall next semester. And my favorite theorem that I'm covering for today is Euler’s formula and Euler’s identity. It's something that I got exposed to back in Professor Krebs’s class when I took his class for differential equations. He was teaching us about second order linear homogeneous differential equations. And in one class session, he introduced the topic of Euler’s formula and identity as a side gem. And I was like, “Oh my goodness, this thing is so incredibly beautiful.” The way that I learned it in his class was he introduced the mathematical expression ex as a Taylor series, and he expanded it out as a series. And then when plugging in eix, then you spat out that series and because of the i, something interesting happens where it starts to be, you could split it up into two individual, or two smaller series, so to speak, of cosine, and i sine x. So you would have the expression eix equal to cosine x plus i sine x. And that to me just seemed that for me, it was like I was gobsmacked. It was just baffling. It was incredible.


EL: Yeah, everything just falls out after that, right?


PMG: Yeah, you're seeing all these terms that come from math, you have e, that comes from compounded interest back when you're learning about it in algebra, you have sine and cosine, that are coming in from the unit circle and trig. And then you have i from complex numbers. So all those just coming in together is is l
Polyploid Mutants This is our show 'Code & Craic' - we broadcast on Twitch every Friday at 3pm CET. That's 9am in NYC and 7.30pm in Mumbai. We have a look at some code and usually discuss some topics in 15 minute (approximately) segments.Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.The evolutionary significance of polyploidy: https://www.nature.com/articles/nrg.2017.26/
62 - Google I/O 2022, Jetpack, Android Studio, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on Google I/O 2022, Jetpack, Android Studio, Animations in Compose, and more! Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu          Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
Who am I and why Limitless Like Me? In this episode I discuss how my personal experiences mirror some of my students. How and why did I get into my current field?

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Conversations with Nina episode 1 Nina and I discuss how one simple 10 second technique can HACK your entire life.

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Hacking YOU! The Husbae and I discuss how hacking your most valuable asset, YOU, can lead to Limitless Living with SMART Goals.

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Limitless Living (Trailer) ---

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More on Metamath I laud the Metamath proof checker and its excellent book.  I am also looking for suggestions on what to discuss next, as I am ready to wrap up this chapter on proof assistants.
Introduction to verified memory management In this episode, I start a new chapter (we are up to Chapter 16, here), about verifying safe manual management of memory.  I have personally gotten pretty interested in this topic, having seen through some simple experiments with Haskell how much time can go into garbage collection for seemingly simple benchmarks.  I also talk about why verifying memory-usage properties of programs is challenging in proof assistants.
Mathematical Objects: Nodal cubic with Angela Tabiri A conversation about mathematics inspired by the nodal cubic. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett. We go closer to the cutting edge of research than usual in this chat with Angela Tabiri about her PhD research.
Orchestration Gone Wild Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.Push, pull, clone is back in the house: https://terminusdb.com/blog/distributed-database-with-collaboration-model/Get the TerminusDB CLI: https://terminusdb.com/docs/index/terminusdb/installKubernetes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kubernetes
Social, Not Social Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.Shared in the chat (funny): https://www.destroyallsoftware.com/talks/the-birth-and-death-of-javascriptVaxine, the CRDT data platform: https://github.com/vaxine-ioBob Muglia's talk at the Knowledge Graph Conference: https://zenodo.org/record/6515008RelationalAI raise a lot of money (i think I said 26m in the episode, but it is much, much more): https://relational.ai/blog/relationalai-raises-usd122m-to-redefine-how-intelligent-data-apps-are-built
You Are Not My Type Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.GeoJSON: https://geojson.org/The Case for Consolidation:https://benn.substack.com/p/case-for-consolidation
What is The Best Programming Language Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.Prolog at 50: http://www.prolog-heritage.org/doc/Announcement_Prolog50.pdfBoo: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boo_(programming_language)Octoverse: https://octoverse.github.com/Stack Overflow Developer SurveyThe Birth and Death of JavaScript: https://www.destroyallsoftware.com/talks/the-birth-and-death-of-javascriptBCPL: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BCPLOz (programming language): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oz_(programming_language)
10.1 License to OSS This is our show 'Code & Craic' - we broadcast on Twitch every Friday at 3pm CET. That's 9am in NYC and 7.30pm in Mumbai. We have a look at some code and usually discuss some topics in 15 minute (approximately) segments. This week however we talking programming languages for the full show. We Love GPLv3, but are Switching License to Apache 2.0: TerminusDB https://terminusdb.com/blog/we-love-gplv3-but-are-switching-license-to-apache-2-0-terminusdb/
Succinct Data Structures This is our show 'Code & Craic' - we broadcast on Twitch every Friday at 3pm CET. That's 9am in NYC and 7.30pm in Mumbai. We have a look at some code and usually discuss some topics in 15 minute (approximately) segments.Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.Our white paper on succinct data structures: https://github.com/terminusdb/terminusdb/blob/dev/docs/whitepaper/terminusdb.pdfNorvig's AI Book: http://aima.cs.berkeley.edu/K trees: https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-642-03784-9_3noms (with interesting data structure): https://github.com/attic-labs/nomsKolomogorov complexity: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kolmogorov_complexityNASA 3D printing: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/glenn/2022/nasa-s-new-material-built-to-withstand-extreme-conditions
Creating Success for ALL students Host Leanne McMahon sits down to talk with Kerryn Sandford, a mathematics educator and principal of a secondary school in Melbourne, about her thoughts on how we can ensure our students achieve success in mathematics.
This episode sponsored by AMSI's own ICE-EM textbook range: https://schools.amsi.org.au/ice-em-mathematics-textbooks/ 
We cover all manner of topics that she mentions in her article in the latest edition of MAV's "Common Denominator" which can be accessed here:
https://www.mav.vic.edu.au/Services-and-News/Common-Denominator-Magazine
Other topics covered are:
Out of Field Maths teachers: https://tinyurl.com/AMSIOoF Also keep an eye out for the Report from the National Summit on Teaching Out-of-field: Synthesis and Recommendations for Policy, Practice and Research. Due end of June 2022.
Year 12 mathematics participation report: https://tinyurl.com/AMSIMathsChoices 
Explicit Instruction: https://tinyurl.com/ExplicitInstructionVicEd
Twitter: @AMSIschools
Contact us: https://calculate.org.au/mathstalk-podcast/
Mathematical Objects: A joke with Bec Hill A conversation about mathematics inspired by a joke. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett, with special guest Bec Hill.
Mathematical Objects: PageRank A conversation about mathematics inspired by the PageRank algorithm. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.
National 5 Maths Percentages National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. Listen to the podcast now and let’s turn your exam experience into a success story. This episode covers:1. Interest2. Reverse percentagesResources: ⋅ Questions for this topic: http://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Percentages ⋅ Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf ⋅ Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring ⋅ Follow Jonas on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jonastutoring/ ⋅ Follow Jonas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jonastutoring/ ⋅ Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
61 - I/O 2022 highlights, Jetpack, Google Play, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering highlights from I/O 2022 including Android Jetpack, Jetpack Compose, Android Studio, Android 13, Google Play, large screens, TV, cars, Wear OS, and more!  Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu          Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
60 - Architecture, Android Basics with Compose, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on the Modern Android Development Skills series on Architecture, Android Basics with Compose, Android 13 Beta 1, Privacy Sandbox preview, and more! Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu            Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
[Bite] Version Control for Data Scientists Data scientists usually have to write code to prototype software, be it to preprocess and clean data, engineer features, build a model, or deploy a codebase into a production environment or other use case. The evolution of a codebase is important for a number of reasons which is where version control can help, such as:collaborating with other code developers (due diligence in coordination and delegation)generating backupsrecording versionstracking changesexperimenting and testingand working with agility.In this bite episode of the DataCafé we talk about these motivators for version control and how it can strengthen your code development and teamwork in building a data science model, pipeline or product.Further reading:Version control via Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Version_control git-scm via https://git-scm.com/"Version Control & Git" by Jason Byrne via Slideshare https://www.slideshare.net/JasonByrne6/version-control-git-86928367"Learn git" via codecademy https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-git"Become a git guru" via Atlassian https://www.atlassian.com/git/tutorialsGitflow workflow via Atlassian https://www.atlassian.com/git/tutorials/comparing-workflows/gitflow-workflow"A successful git branching model" by Vincent Dressian https://nvie.com/posts/a-successful-git-branching-model/ Branching strategies via GitVersion https://gitversion.net/docs/learn/branching-strategies/Recording date: 21 April 2022
Landing Data Science Projects: The Art of Change Management & Implementation Are people resistant to change? And if so, how do you manage that when trying to introduce and deliver innovation through Data Science?In this episode of the DataCafé we discuss the challenges faced when trying to land a data science project. There are a number of potential barriers to success that need to be carefully managed. We talk about "change management" and aspects of employee behaviours and stakeholder management that influence the chances of landing a project. This is especially important for embedding innovation in your company or organisation, and implementing a plan to sustain the changes needed to deliver long-term value.Further reading & referencesKotter's 8 Step Change Plan Armenakis, Achilles & Harris, Stanley & Mossholder, Kevin. (1993). Creating Readiness for Organizational Change. Human Relations. 46. 681-704. 10.1177/001872679304600601. Lewin, K (1944a) Constructs in Field Theory. In D Cartwright(Ed):(1952) Field Theory in Social Science: Selected Theoretical Papers by Kurt Lewin. London: Social Science Paperbacks. pp30-42Lewin, K. (1947) ‘Frontiers in Group Dynamics: Concept, Method and Reality in Social Science; Social Equilibria and Social Change’, Human Relations, 1(1), pp. 5–41. doi: 10.1177/001872674700100103.Some links above may require payment or login. We are not endorsing them or receiving any payment for mentioning them. They are provided as is. Often free versions of papers are available and we would encourage you to investigate.Recording date: 10 February 2022
The Power of Mathematical Storytelling Sunil Singh, the author of Chasing Rabbits and other books, shares fascinating stories that show mathematics as a universal place of exploration and comfort. Stories of mathematical struggle and discovery in the classroom help students connect deeply with the topic, feel the passion, and see math as multi-cultural and class-free.

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Metamath In this episode I share my initial impressions -- very positive! -- of the Metamath system.  Metamath allows one to develop theorems from axioms which you state.  Typing or other syntactic requirements of axioms or theorems are also expressed axiomatically.  The system exhibits an elegant coherent vision for how such a tool should work, and was super easy to download and try out.
Never Expect This in Programming Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.Wat: https://www.destroyallsoftware.com/talks/watYAML: https://yaml-multiline.info/Prolog Prize: http://www.prolog-heritage.org/doc/Announcement_Prolog50.pdf
Mathematical Objects: Hairy ball A conversation about mathematics inspired by a hairy ball. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett.
71: What's the Matter? An Interview with Chris Cogswell of the Mad Scientist Podcast (Material Science) Matter is that which takes up space, and has mass. It is what we interact with, and what we are. Imagining a world without matter is to imagine light particles drifting aimlessly in space. Gasses, liquids, solids, and plasmas are all states of matter. Material science studies all of these, and their combinations and intricacies, found in examining foams, gels, meshes, and other materials and metamaterials. Chris Cogswell is a material scientist, and host of The Mad Scientist Podcast, a podcast that takes a critical look at things ranging from technological fads, to pseudoscience, and topics that deserve a critical eye. On the first of a pair of two episodes about material science, we interview Chris about his experience with studying material science, and ask questions about the subject in general.
Links referenced by Chris Cogswell:
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUvi5eQhPTc is about nanomagnetism and cool demonstration of ferrofluid
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Dlt63N-Uuk goes over nanomagnetic applications in medicine
- http://yaghi.berkeley.edu/pdfPublications/04MOFs.pdf Great review paper on new class of materials known as MOFs which are going to be very important in coming years
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkYimZBzguw Crash course engineering on nanomaterials, really good introduction to the field
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7EYQLOlwDM Oak Ridge national lab paper on using nano materials for carbon dioxide conversion to other carbon molecules
- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cxVFopLpIQY Really good paper on carbon capture technology challenges and economics
[Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch, Meryl Flaherty; Chris Cogswell]

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59 - Play Target SDK, Android Attestation, Architecture, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on expanded Play Target SDK requirements, Android Attestation, Modern Android Development Skills series on Architecture, Android for Cars, Google Play Academy, game development, and much more! Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu            Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
ALGEBRA OF PROBABILITY Continuing on our journey to learn more about Probability, let's know the different types of simple rules that we apply to find out suitable probability.
The Seventeen Provers of the World I discuss a book edited by Freek Wiedijk (pronounced "Frake Weedike"), which describes the solutions he received in response to a call for formalized proofs of the irrationality of the square root of 2.  The book was published in 2006, and made an impression on me then.  The provers we have discussed so far all have a solution in the book, except for Lean, which was created after that year.  Happily, you can find a PDF of the book here, on Wiedijk's web site.
Mathematical Objects: Superegg with Hannah Fry A conversation about mathematics inspired by a superegg. Presented by Katie Steckles and Peter Rowlett, with special guest Hannah Fry.
Excel is Code Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.Intro to distributed systems: https://www.educative.io/blog/distributed-systems-considerations-tradeoffsShare of Internet that is porn: https://www.statista.com/chart/16959/share-of-the-internet-that-is-porn/How Porn Drove Innovation https://visual.ly/community/Infographics/technology/how-porn-drove-innovation-techExcel as Code https://github.com/GavinMendelGleason/excel_as_codeComments on Excel as Code: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=28595155 Spreadsheets are so hot right now: https://www.wired.com/story/spreadsheets-are-hot-and-cranking-out-complex-code/Idiocracy: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/Excel Incel Overlap https://www.reddit.com/r/WhitePeopleTwitter/comments/hqo9k1/excel_incel_overlap/CRISPR: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CRISPR
Deep Learning Neural Networks: Building Trust and Breaking Bias We explore one of the key issues around Deep Learning Neural Networks - how can you prove that your neural network will perform correctly? Especially if the neural network in question is at the heart of a mission-critical application, such as making a real-time control decision in an autonomous car. Similarly, how can you establish if you've trained your neural network at the heart of a loan decision agent  with a prebuilt bias? How can you be sure that your black box is going to adapt to critical new situations?We speak with Prof. Alessio Lomuscio about how Mixed Integer Linear Programs (MILPs) and Symbolic Interval Propagation can be used to capture and solve verification problems in large Neural Networks. Prof. Lomuscio leads the Verification of Autonomous Systems Group in the Dept. of Computing at Imperial College; their results have shown that verification is feasible for models in the millions of tunable parameters, which was previously not possible. Tools like VENUS and VeriNet, developed in their lab, can verify key operational properties in Deep Learning Networks and this has a particular relevance for safety-critical applications in e.g. the aviation industry, medical imaging and autonomous transportation. Particularly importantly, given that neural networks are only as good as the training data that they have learned from, it is also possible to prove that a particular defined bias does or does not exist for a given network. This latter case is, of course, important for many social or industrial applications: being able to show that a decisioning tool treats people of all genders, ethnicities and abilities equitably.Interview GuestOur interview guest Alessio Lomuscio is Professor of Safe Artificial Intelligence in the Department of Computing at Imperial College London. Anyone wishing to contact Alessio about his team's verification technology can do so via his Imperial College website, or via the Imperial College London spin-off Safe Intelligence that will be commercialising the AI verification technology in the future.Further ReadingPublication list for Prof. Alessio Lomuscio  (via Imperial College London)Paper on Formal Analysis of Neural Network-based Systems in the Aircraft Domain using the VENUS tool (via Imperial College London)Paper on Scalable Complete Verification of ReLU Neural Networks via Dependency-based Branching (via IJCAI.org)Paper on DEEPSPLIT: An Efficient Splitting Method for Neural Network Verification via Indirect Effect Analysis (via IJCAI.org)Team: Verification of Autonomous Systems Group, Department of Computing, Imperial College LondonTools: VENUS and VeriNetSome links above may require payment or login. We are not endorsing them or receiving any payment for mentioning them. They are provided as is. Often free versions of papers are available and we would encourage you to investigate.Recording date: 8 Feb 2022Interview date: 31 Aug 2021
Like Git, but for data Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.KeyKOS https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KeyKOS
58 - Android 13, MAD Skills Architecture, Android TV & Google TV series, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on Android 13 Developer Preview 2, Modern Android Development Skills series on Architecture, Integrate with Android TV & Google TV series, and much more! Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu            Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
Where have all the good robots gone? Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.As I don't have any documentation on cardinality, I will just plug this new blog instead:8 Reasons to Version Control your database: https://terminusdb.com/blog/8-reasons-to-version-control-your-database/Data mesh by it's founder Zhamak Dehghani - this is an essential introduction to the ideas: https://martinfowler.com/articles/data-mesh-principles.htmlThis is a good engineering intro to data mesh. I appreciated its straightforward descriptions: https://www.datamesh-architecture.com/Three laws of robotics: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Laws_of_Robotics I, Robot (by Asimov - not the 'adaptation' Will Smith movie): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I,_RobotThe robot vacuum cleaner company is called 'I, Robot': https://www.irobot.ie/roomba
National 5 Maths Simultaneous Equations (SQA) National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. Listen to the podcast now and let’s turn your exam experience into a success story. This episode covers: 1. Linear simultaneous equations by elimination2. Linear simultaneous equations by substitutionResources: ⋅ Questions for this topic: http://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Simultaneous-equations ⋅ Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf ⋅ Thousands of exam-like questions: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tests ⋅ Public past papers: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/papers/Maths ⋅ Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring ⋅ Follow Jonas on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jonastutoring/ ⋅ Follow Jonas on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@jonastutoring? ⋅ Follow Jonas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jonastutoring/ ⋅ Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
70: This Episode Intentionally Left Blank This episode description intentionally left blank.

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70.1: Episode 70.1 of Breaking Math Podcast (Self-Reference) Seldom do we think about self-reference, but it is a huge part of the world we live in. Every time that we say 'myself', for instance, we are engaging in self-reference. Long ago, the Liar Paradox and the Golden Ratio were among the first formal examples of self-reference. Freedom to refer to the self has given us fruitful results in mathematics and technology. Recursion, for example, is used in algorithms such as PageRank, which is one of the primary algorithms in Google's search engine. Elements of self-reference can also be found in foundational shifts in the way we understand mathematics, and has propelled our understanding of mathematics forward. Forming modern set theory was only possible due to a paradox called Russel's paradox, for example. Even humor uses self-reference. Realizing this, can we find harmony in self-reference? Even in a podcast intro, are there elements of self-reference? Nobody knows, but I'd check if I were you. Catch all of this, and more, on this episode of Breaking Math. Episode 70.1: Episode Seventy Point One of Breaking Math Podcast

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Episode 75 - Dave Kung Kevin Knudson: Welcome to my favorite theorem, a math podcast with no quiz at the end. I'm Kevin Knudson, a professor of mathematics at the University of Florida. And I'm joined by my other host.

Evelyn Lamb: Hi, I’m Evelyn Lamb, a freelance math and science writer in Salt Lake City, Utah, where we just got a lovely few inches of snow last night. So I've developed a theory that podcasts cause snow here. Although it could be the other way. Maybe snow causes podcasts.


KK: Maybe.


EL: It’s hard to tell.


KK: I don't know. It's 85 degrees for today. Sorry.


EL: Yeah. I meant to say don't tell me what the weather is in Florida.


KK: It’s very nice.


EL: It’s too painful.


KK: It’s very nice. Yes, speaking of painful, we were having our pre-banter about I had a little hand surgery yesterday, and I have this ridiculous wrap on my right hand, and it's making me kind of useless today. So I have to do anything left handed, and to control everything on the computer left handed. But you know, it'll resolve my issue on my finger. That'll be good. So anyway, today, we are pleased to welcome Dave Kung. Dave, why don't you introduce yourself?


Dave Kung: Hi, there. I'm Dave Kung. I'm a mathematician by training. I spent 21 years at St. Mary's College of Maryland, and I've recently moved on from there, and I work at the Dana Center, the Charles A. Dana Center, at the University of Texas at Austin. I work with Uri Treisman down there on math ed policy.


KK: It’s very cool. So you got a really serious taco upgrade.


DK: Definitely. I'm still living in Maryland, but I get to visit to Texas every few months.


KK: Are you gonna relocate there? Or are you just gonna stay in Maryland?


DK: I’ll be here for now. Yeah.


KK: I mean, it seems like the sort of work that you could do remotely, it’s policy work mostly, right?


DK: A lot of policy work. There's going to be a fair amount of travel once that's more of a thing, but not all of it will be to Texas. Some of it will actually be in DC, in which case, I'm pretty close.


EL: Yeah, you’re right there.


KK: Yeah. Yeah. Well, they do really great work at the Dana center. I've been involved a little bit with the math pathways business, and it is really vital stuff. And of course, Uri is, like, well, he's the pied piper or something else. I don't know. But when you hear him talk about it, he's an evangelist, you really you can't help but like him.


DK: Yeah. And making sure that we know that students have the right math at the right time with the right supports, we're far from that goal right now, but we can get closer.


EL: Yeah, very important work for all mathematicians to care about.


KK: Yeah, yeah. Okay, but I think we're going to talk a little bit higher-level than math pathways today. So we asked you on to have a favorite theorem. What is it?


DK: My favorite theorem is the Banach-Tarski theorem, which is usually labeled the Banach-Tarski paradox.


KK: Yes. Yeah. So what is let's hear it. Well, let's let our listeners know.


DK: So the Banach-Tarski paradox says the following thing: that you can take a ball, think of a sort of a solid ball, and you can split it up into a finite number of pieces — we’ll come back to that word pieces in a bit — but you can split it up into a finite number of pieces, and then just move those pieces and end up with two balls the same size and the same shape as the original. It is incredibly paradoxical. And I remember hearing this theorem a long time ago, and it just sort of blew my mind.


EL: Yeah, it was one — I think I was an undergraduate, I don't think I'd even taken, like, a real analysis class. But I heard about this and read this book, there's this book about it that I think it's called The Pea and the Sun. Because another statement of — I mean, once you can make two of the same size things out of one, you can make kind of anything out of anything.


DK: Just repeat that process. That's the other statement, you take a pea and you do it enough times. And if you do it, well, you can reassemble them to form a sun. Absurd.


EL: Yeah, I just, I mean, reading it, there was a lot that went over my head at the time, because of what my mathematical background was, but at first, I was like, Okay, this means that math is irrevocably broken. And then after actually reading it, it’s like, okay, it doesn't mean math is broken. So maybe, maybe you should talk a little more about why it doesn't mean math is broken. If you have that perspective. Maybe you do think math is broken. <br
Episode 68 - Should you be a sales Engineer? This week we talk with Jason Hoover, he's the senior director for structural solution with MITEK. After listening to the episode let us know if you would ever switch over to engineering sales or if you currently are in engineering sales let us know how you like it.If you plan to be in Denver for this year’s Steel Conference on March 23rd through the 25th swing by booth 2203 and meet Jason in person.WebsiteInstagramLinkedInFaceBookYouTubeEmail: info@theengineeringpodcast.com
57 - App Excellence Summit 2022, AndroidX, and more Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on #TheAndroidShow, game development, safety, App Excellence 2022, app architecture, app archiving, AndroidX releases, and more.   Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu            Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
Series 2 Introduction Looks like we might be about to have a new Series of DataCafé!Recording date: 15 Feb 2022Intro music by Music 4 Video Library (Patreon supporter)
[Bite] Wordle: Winning against the algorithm The grey, green and yellow squares taking over social media in the last few weeks is an example of the fascinating field of study known as Game Theory.  In this bite episode of DataCafé we talk casually about Wordle - the internet phenomenon currently challenging players to guess a new five letter word each day. Six guesses inform players what letters they have gotten right and if they are in the right place. It’s a lovely example of the different ways people approach game strategy through their choice of guesses and ways to use the information presented within the game. WordlesWordle - the originalAbsurdle - it&apos;s Wordle but it fights you!Nerdle - Maths WordleQuordle - when one Wordle is not enough!Foclach - Irish WordleAnalysisStatistical analysis of hard-mode Wordle with Matlab by Matt Tearle (youtube)The science behind Wordle by Ido Frizler (medium.com)Some links above may require payment or login. We are not endorsing them or receiving any payment for mentioning them. They are provided as is. Often free versions of papers are available and we would encourage you to investigate.Recording date: 15 Feb 2022Intro music by Music 4 Video Library (Patreon supporter)
Pi Day 2022 Pi Day is celebrated across the world on March 14. Pi Day celebrates the mathematical constant π (3.14). It is celebrated in countries that follow the month/day (m/dd) date format, because the digits in the date, March 14 or 3/14, are the first three digits of π (3.14). Pi Day was founded by Physicist Larry Shaw in 1988. We all can celebrate the special day with something special to be done Mathematically or just eat pies !!
More on Lean I talk about my positive experience trying out the tools for Lean, specifically the &apos;lean&apos; executable and lean-mode in emacs.
It's Pronounced Nu-cular Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.Critical Asset Management System (climate resilience project): https://climateresilient.world/And the repo: https://github.com/CriticalAssetManagementData.world knowledge graph article data catalog article: https://data.world/blog/3-ways-to-confirm-your-data-catalog-is-really-powered-by-a-knowledge-graph/Google 'Things not Strings' to intro the knowledge graph: https://www.blog.google/products/search/introducing-knowledge-graph-things-not/ Knowledge graph on wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knowledge_graphIt's pronounced nu-cular:
The Mathematical World and the Physical World Yusra Idichchou explores the question: Does math imitate life or does life imitate math? We touch on Oscar Wilde, philosophy of both math and language, how formal abstractions can describe the subjective physical world and various philosophies of mathematics.

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Distro Wars Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret.Critical Asset Management System (climate resilience project): https://climateresilient.world/And the repo: https://github.com/CriticalAssetManagementText rendering hates you: https://gankra.github.io/blah/text-hates-you/CentOS: https://www.centos.org/Privacy in Ubuntu: https://www.eff.org/nl/deeplinks/2012/10/privacy-ubuntu-1210-amazon-ads-and-data-leaks
The Lean Prover In this episode, I talk about what I have learned so far about the Lean prover, especially from an excellent (if somewhat advanced) Master&apos;s thesis, &quot;The Type Theory of Lean&quot; by Marco Garneiro.
56 - Jetpack Compose 1.1 stable, DataStore, Android 13 preview, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on MAD Skills DataStore, Jetpack Compose 1.1 stable, Material You coming to more Android devices near you, the first developer preview of Android 13, and more! For links to these items, check out Now in Android #56 on Medium → https://goo.gle/3vcX75o    Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu            Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
Season 4 Announcement (and a Rerun of Forbidden Formulas) Hello, listeners! This is Sofia with an announcement.
Season 4 is about to start, and we have some great episodes planned. The last few weeks have been busy for us in our personal lives, and we apologize for our spotty release schedule lately. We're excited to bring you more of the content you've grown to love.
Today, we're going to have a rerun of our first episode on. This episode is a little rough at points, but we're choosing to rerun it because it captures the spirit of the podcast so elegantly. So, without further ado, here is Breaking Math episode 1: Forbidden Formulas.

[Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch; Amy Lynn]

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This episode is sponsored by
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Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support
Happy Terminalia Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbAlso check out Matthijs' coding sessions on twitch - they are a delight, you won't regret. JSON Diff and Patch on Hacker News: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=30362025Documentation for our new, open JSON diff and patch API: https://terminusdb.com/docs/index/json-diff-and-patch'web3 ?!?!' https://lobste.rs/s/st5qeh/what_s_difference_json_diff_patchMelania Trump bought her own NFT: https://fortune.com/2022/02/16/melania-trump-nft-auction/What is in a name? (the story of TerminusDB's name): https://terminusdb.com/blog/terminusdb-whats-in-a-name/Terminalia - our day: https://terminusdb.com/blog/terminalia-our-day/Wikipedia backgroun to Terminalia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terminalia_(festival)If you read this and want to come to our Terminalia party, email me luke@terminusdb.com - we'll even send you a beer.
PROBABILITY- Events Probability theory is an important part of Mathematical study. In this session we are going to learn something about the terms Event, special events like Sure event, Impossible event, Simple and Compound events.
More on Isabelle, and the Complexity of ITPs I talk about my attempts to use Isabelle as a newbie, and reflect a little on the complexity of both Isabelle and Coq.
Revenge of the Shape Rotators Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbPluggable Auth in TerminusDB: https://gist.github.com/GavinMendelGleason/b4f0c32e893549a9633e1e5a8a87b889Check it out in action: dashboard.terminusdb.comVice piece on Wordcels and Shape Rotators: https://www.vice.com/en/article/pkpqzb/ok-wtf-are-wordcels-and-shape-rotatorsThe inventor of the concept: https://twitter.com/tszzlAnd his blog telling us what it is all about: https://roonscape.substack.com/p/a-song-of-shapes-and-wordsThe game we were playing ('play zig zag'): https://vladimirslepnev.itch.io/zigzag
Episode 74 - Priyam Patel Evelyn Lamb: Hello, and welcome to My Favorite Theorem, the math podcast with no quiz at the end. I'm your host Evelyn Lamb. I'm a freelance math and science writer in Salt Lake City, Utah. And this is your other host.

Kevin Knudson: I’m Kevin Knudson, professor of mathematics at the University of Florida. I almost forgot my name there for a second.


EL: It happens.


KK: I realized, like, I was hesitating, and I was like, “Who am I again?” Yeah, you know — so our listeners don't know, but it's 5:30 where I am, which, you know, doesn't sound late. But I've been at work all day, and now I'm tired.


EL: Yeah. Well, you should have made up something. You know, just tried on a different name for fun just to see.


KK: Well, yeah, so even my parents had the deal that if I was a boy, my dad got to name me. So he went with Kevin Patrick. And if I was a girl, my mother was going to get to name me. And should I tell you what I would have been?


EL: Yeah.


KK: Kandi. Kay Knudson.


EL: Yikes!


KK: Now, I'll let you work out why that would have been terrible for lots of reasons. Already, there are multiple axes along which that is terrible.


EL: Great. Yeah, well, my name if I had been a boy ended up with my younger brother. So it was kind of not that interesting. I mean, if you knew my family, you would be like, Okay, well, that's boring. Anyway, yeah. We are very happy today to have Priyam Patel on the show. So yeah, Priyam, could you introduce yourself a little bit?


Priyam Patel: Sure. So my name is Priyam. I am an assistant professor at the University of Utah, and I have been here for three years. Before that I was around everywhere, it feels like, for my postdoc. I was at UCSB for a few years, before that at Purdue for a few years, And I did my PhD at Rutgers, which now feels like ages ago.


EL: Yeah, you’ve been in, like, every region of the country, though, I guess not central timezone, because Indiana is right on the west edge of Eastern.


KK: That’s right.


PP: Yeah. So I was never in the Central time zone. And that's why — in the summer in Indiana, the sun sets at, like, 10:30pm. It's really bizarre.


KK: You could call that Central Daylight if you wanted to, right?


PP: Yeah. Something like that.


EL: Yeah. And as you mentioned, you've been at Utah for about three years. And you you first got here in fall 2019, and I was gone for most of the fall 2019. And then of course, we all know what happened in 2020. So part of the reason I wanted to invite you is because I feel like I should know you better because you've lived here for three years. But, like, with the weirdness of the past three years, I feel like I haven't gotten to talk with you that much. And so of course, obviously the best way to do this is, like, on a podcast that we want to just broadcast to the entire world.


PP: Yeah, perfect. So no private conversation over drinks. Just put me on the podcast.


EL: Yeah. Excellent. So So yes, I'm excited to get to chat with you. And yeah, hopefully we can do this over drinks in a real venue at some point.


KK: Wait a minute, what happened in 2020?


EL: I tried to block it out.


PP: Nothing at all.


EL: For some parts of it, really nothing.


PP: It feels like a whole blur since then. So


KK: I’m not convinced it isn’t still 2020 somehow.


PP: Yeah, yeah.


KK: Alright. Anyway, I'm being weird today, and I apologize. So let’s get to math. So Priyam, you have a favorite theorem. Which is it?


PP: Yeah. So I chose the Brouwer fixed point theorem, which I learned has been done twice already on this podcast.


EL: Yes, I'm very excited to hear more about it because in our emails, you mentioned some aspects of that I wasn't aware of. And so this is very exciting. And this is when people, when we email with people, they’re always like, “well has this been used?” And we're like, “It doesn't matter if it has, you can use it anyway.” We like to talk about theorems because it is interesting, just the different relationships people have with the same math. So for anyone who hasn't been you know, avidly listening and taking notes on every single episode we've done since 2017, can you tell us what the Brouwer fixed point theorem is?


PP: Yeah, so I'm just going to state it for the closed disk because that's the only context that I'm going to talk about it in. But basically, if you take in the plane in our two if you take the closed unit disk, then the theorem says that every continuous map from
Getting Athletes to Think Like Mathematicians Caron Rivera, a math teacher at a school for elite athletes, shares how she breaks through the myth of the "math person" and teaches athletes to think like mathematicians. Her problem solving technique applies to anything. Through it her students get comfortable with not knowing, with the adventure of seeking the answer. They build their brains in the process.

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Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-art-of-mathematics/message
55 - Android Studio, DataStore, Glance, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on Android Studio Bumblebee, Modern Android Development Skills series on DataStore, building apps for Android Automotive OS, and more! For links to these items, check out Now in Android #55 on Medium → https://goo.gle/3gySSbx    Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu            Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs
Episode 67 - Pultruded FRP Zach and Max sit down with Jake Althouse, an FRP enthusiast, certainly an expert by my standards, and head of advanced materials at Frost Engineeeing. Jake gave us the run-down on all things FRP. If you've ever wondered when, how, and why to use FRP, this episode will pull(trude) you to your first succesful FRP project.WebsiteInstagramLinkedInFaceBookYouTubeEmail: info@theengineeringpodcast.com
P, or NP, that is the question Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbJSON Diffs documentation: https://terminusdb.com/docs/index/json-diff-and-patchTable diff product that is getting ready to launch: https://versionxl.com/P v NP primer (I still couldn't understand): https://jeremykun.com/2012/02/23/p-vs-np-a-primer-and-a-proof-written-in-racket/Apple's 10 billion blow to facebook: https://www.cnbc.com/2022/02/02/facebook-says-apple-ios-privacy-change-will-cost-10-billion-this-year.html29 billion in value wiped off Meta: https://news.sky.com/story/facebook-founder-mark-zuckerberg-takes-29bn-hit-as-meta-share-price-plunges-12532517
The Problem with Maths (and some digital ideas to fix it) Happy New year and welcome to 2022!

In our first episode for the year, host Leanne McMahon talks to educator and digital guru Greg O'Connor from Texthelp. Greg poses some of the problems he sees in how our students are learning maths and suggests some solutions for overcoming these issues. Contact us at www.calculate.org.au or https://www.facebook.com/amsischools 

Resources:

Contact Greg:

Email: g.oconnor@texthelp.com

Twitter @gregoconnor

Webpage: gregoryoconnor.com

Texthelp

www.texthelp.com

EquatIO

https://www.texthelp.com/en-au/products/equatio/ 

EquatIO - Free for Teachers

http://text.help/freeforteachers

EquatIO For Schools/Universities - contact asiapac@texthelp.com

Other resources:

Early math skills predict later academic success

Australia’s Chief Scientist 2020 Australia's STEM Workforce Report

A couple of posts by Greg:

Literacy the real barrier to STEM uptake

Can educational technologies help to reverse Australia’s maths slump?

How should schools tackle the maths slump?

Research has shown that mathematics textbooks contain more concepts per sentence and paragraph than any other type of text.

Joan M. Kenney (2005) Literacy Strategies for Improving Mathematics Instruction, ASCD, 2005

STEM texts are often written above the grade level for which they are intended

Barton, M. L., Heidema, C., & Jordan, D. (2002). Teaching Reading in Mathematics and Science. Educational leadership, 60(3), 24-28. PDF

Does reading *really* matter in mathematics?

https://www.theconfidentteacher.com/2021/04/does-reading-really-matter-in-mathematics/

Readability with Rewordify

https://rewordify.com/
Episode 66 - GC and SE walk into a bar... This week we talk with Chris Whittle a project engineer at a construction company. It's taken some time but we got a contractor to join us on the show. Let us know what your thoughts are on the episode and any questions you might have! WebsiteInstagramLinkedInFaceBookYouTubeEmail: info@theengineeringpodcast.com
Additional Support for Exam Revision Maths & Science Revision with Jonas provides you easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. Listen to the podcast now and let’s turn your exam experience into a success story. This episode covers: Additional Support for Exam RevisionResources: ⋅ Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf ⋅ Thousands of exam-like questions: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/all ⋅ Public past papers: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/papers/Maths ⋅ Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring ⋅ Follow Jonas on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jonastutoring/ ⋅ Follow Jonas on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@jonastutoring? ⋅ Follow Jonas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jonastutoring/ ⋅ Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Isabelle/HOL The Isabelle theorem prover supports different logics, but its most developed seems to be Higher-Order Logic (HOL).  In this episode, I talk about the logic and approach of Isabelle/HOL, as far as I have understood them.
Crypto getting Rusty A few notes from the show:Schema as a service: https://terminusdb.com/products/schema-as-a-service/Greenspun's 10th rule: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenspun%27s_tenth_ruleScryer Prolog: https://github.com/mthom/scryer-prologKlima DAO: https://www.klimadao.finance/Bitcoin Pizza: https://www.moneycontrol.com/news/business/cryptocurrency/bitcoin-pizza-day-2021-some-interesting-facts-about-this-special-cryptocurrency-day-6924731.htmlCrypto/blockchain in Rust: https://github.com/rust-in-blockchain/awesome-blockchain-rustAnd more: https://www.reddit.com/r/rust/comments/a93dv8/cryptocurrencies_written_in_rust/
New ways of seeing with the INTEGRAL project It's amazing what you can see now thanks to remote imaging technology! Visiting far away landscapes via satellite images or watching live feeds from a famous street is fun, but remotely gathered images offer exciting new opportunities to map and observe the world. The problem is that the vast amount of remotely gathered data now available is useless on it's own – we need to have the means to analyse and extract information from those images.

This is exactly what the members of the INTEGRAL project (https://sites.google.com/view/remote-sens-research-for-india), researchers based at the University of Cambridge and researchers and industry partners in India, are working on. This is an innovative collaboration between people collecting remote sensing data – such as satellite images of forests and video from traffic cameras – and researchers developing the technology to analyse those remotely gathered images to answer meaningful questions.

In this podcast we talk to some of the members of the INTEGRAL team about the innovative machine learning approaches they are developing to understand remotely gathered images, and the significant impact these technologies can have on the world. Our thanks to Carola-Bibiane Schönlieb, James Woodcock, Angelica Aviles Rivero, Debmita Bandyopadhyay, Rihuan Ke and David Coomes, all from the University of Cambridge (https://www.cam.ac.uk/), and to Saurabh Pandey from KritiKal Solutions (https://kritikalsolutions.com/) and Sanjay Bisht from IORA Ecological Solutions (https://ioraecological.com/), both based in India.

You can read more about the INTEGRAL team's work in https://plus.maths.org/content/seeing-traffic-through-new-eyes and about their new AI approaches in https://plus.maths.org/content/maths-minute-semi-supervised-machine-learning. And you can find much more information about machine learning(https://plus.maths.org/content/maths-minute-machine-learning-and-neural-networks) and image analysis (https://plus.maths.org/content/tags/image-analysis) on Plus<.
Rerun of P1: Peano Addition On this problem episode, join Sofía and guest Diane Baca to learn about what an early attempt to formalize the natural numbers has to say about whether or not m+n equals n+m.

[Featuring: Sofía Baca; Diane Baca]

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This episode is sponsored by
· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support
Distributed Transactions ftw Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbNice Git primer to get the distributed juices flowing: https://gist.github.com/williewillus/068e9a8543de3a7ef80adb2938657b6bFoundation Series: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foundation_seriesInfamous Simon Wardley tweets: https://twitter.com/swardley/status/1481201844907089923TerminusDB 'Git for Data' white paper: https://github.com/terminusdb/terminusdb/blob/dev/docs/whitepaper/terminusdb.pdf
69: An Interview with Michael Brooks, Author of "The Art of More: How Mathematics Created Civilization" Michael Brooks is a science writer who specializes in making difficult concepts easier to grasp. In his latest book, Brooks goes through several mathematical concepts and discusses their motivation, history, and discovery. So how do stories make it easier to learn? What are some of the challenges associated with conveying difficult concepts to the general public? And who, historically, has been a mathematician? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math. Songs were Breaking Math Intro and Outro by Elliot Smith of Albuquerque. This episode is published under a Creative Commons 4.0 Attribute-ShareAlike-NonCommercial license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch, Meryl Flaherty; Michael Brooks]

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This episode is sponsored by
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Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support
54 - Gradle, DataStore, AndroidX, Glance, and more! Welcome to Now in Android, your ongoing guide to what’s new and notable in the world of Android development. Today, we're covering updates on Glance for app widgets, the Jetpack Watch Face Library, the rebuilt guide to App Architecture, and much more! For links to these items, check out Now in Android #54 on Medium → https://goo.gle/3rEV2vm   Now in Android podcast → https://goo.gle/2BDIo9y            Now in Android articles → https://goo.gle/2xtWmsu            Now in Android playlist → https://goo.gle/now-in-android            Subscribe to Android Developers → https://goo.gle/AndroidDevs           #Featured #AndroidDevelopers #NowInAndroid
Gathering Resources for Exam Revision Maths & Science Revision with Jonas provides you easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. Listen to the podcast now and let’s turn your exam experience into a success story. This episode covers: Gathering Resources for Exam RevisionResources: ⋅ Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf ⋅ Thousands of exam-like questions: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/all ⋅ Public past papers: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/papers/Maths ⋅ Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring ⋅ Follow Jonas on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jonastutoring/ ⋅ Follow Jonas on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@jonastutoring? ⋅ Follow Jonas on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jonastutoring/ ⋅ Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
More on Agda I talk a bit more about the Agda proof assistant.
Episode 73 - Courtney Gibbons Kevin Knudson: Welcome to My Favorite Theorem, a math podcast with no quiz at the end. I'm Kevin Knudson, professor of mathematics at the University of Florida, and I'm joined today by my fabulous co-host.

Evelyn Lamb: Hi, I'm Evelyn Lamb, a freelance math and science writer in Salt Lake City where we are preparing for another snowstorm this week after we had one last week, which is great because we are so low on water right now and we need every bit of precipitation. So even though I'm from Texas, and I don't naturally love shoveling snow or being below 50 degrees, I am thrilled that we're supposed to get snow tonight.


KK: So when I lived in Michigan — you know, I grew up in North Carolina, so snow was a thing, but we didn't shovel it. We just sort of lived with it — and I had a neighbor across the street who was in his 70s. And he had a snowblower and he let me use it and I thought this is amazing. So if you and John haven't invested in a snowblower yet, you know, maybe it's time.


EL: But we'll see. Climate change means that we might have to do less and less snow shoveling.


KK: Well, it's true. Actually, I remember growing up, you know skiing was a thing in North Carolina and I think you might still be able to but like the natural snow ski resorts, kind of they have to manufacture all their snow now. It's, it's things have changed even in my lifetime, but it's not real. As we're told, it's not real. Sorry to editorialize. Anyway, let's talk math. Today, we are pleased to welcome Courtney Gibbons. Why don't you introduce yourself?


Courtney Gibbons: Hi, I'm Courtney Gibbons. I will see far more snow up here in Clinton, New York, then either of you, I think.


EL: Definitely.


CG: I just sent in my plowing contract for the year. So that's awesome. Make sure that I don't have to shovel or snowblow my own driveway, which is not long. I'm a professor. I'm an associate professor of mathematics at Hamilton College up here in beautiful Clinton, New York. There is a Hamilton, New York, but that's where Colgate is. So don't get them confused.


KK: Oh, right.


CG: Yeah. It’s weird. It's a strange thing.


EL: Yeah. At least it’s not the whole Indiana University of Pennsylvania thing because that is not okay.


CG: Yeah, no, no. I think there was an incident on one of our campuses where, like, Albany sent some kind of emergency response squad to the wrong Hamilton. But they're only 20 minutes away, so it was a quick thing. Yeah.


KK: All right. Well, welcome. So, I mean, well, maybe we just get into it.


EL: Well, I will say that we have talked to Courtney before on the podcast, although extremely briefly, when we, I guess this must have been the joint meetings that 2019 a decade ago. (Hahaha.)


KK: Yeah.


EL: We had people give us, you know, little, like, minute or two sound bites of their favorite theorems. And she did talk about a theorem, although I understand it's not the theorem that she's going to talk about today, which, I mean, you don't have one and only theorem in your life? Come on, Courtney.


CG: I am a lover of many theorems. I think back then I mentioned Hilbert’s Nullstellensatz, which is the beautiful zero point theorem that links roots of polynomials to factors of polynomials over algebraically closed fields. It's beautiful. It's a really nice theorem. I initially thought I was going to talk about Hilbert’s syzygy theorem today, which by the way, syzygy, excellent hangman word.


EL: Yeah.


CG: Unless you're playing with people. You've used that word on before, in which case, their first guess will be Y. But I decided today I wanted to talk about Emmy Noether’s isomorphism theorems, in part because they're usually just called the isomorphism theorems. And Emmy Noether’s attribution gets lost somehow. So I wanted to talk about those today because I'm a huge Noether fan. I mean, I'm also a huge Hilbert fan. You kind of have to be a big fan of both. But these theorems are super cool. They're theorems you could see in your first course in abstract algebra, and that's actually where I first saw them. I'm a commutative algebraist and I do a lot of homological algebra. So I love arrows. I love kernels. I love cokernels. I love images. I love anything you can set up in an exact sequence, and I think this was my first exposure to a theorem that was best explained with a diagram. And I remember at that moment being like, “This is what I want to do! I want to draw these arrows.” And I'm lucky because I got to grow up to do what I want to do.


EL: That’s kind of funny because I loved abstract algebra when I took it in undergrad, and I
The Art of Definitions Brian Katz of CSULB joins us once again to discuss mathematical definitions. Students often see them as cast in stone. Prof. Katz helps them see that they're artifacts of human choices. The student has the power to create mathematics through definitions. This is illustrated by the definitions of "sandwich" and "approaching a limit." What makes a good definition? How is mathematics like a dream?

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Craic and Code #1 Twitch channel with the full show: https://www.twitch.tv/terminusdbData mesh intro: https://martinfowler.com/articles/data-mesh-principles.htmlFormal methods (from CMU, Gavin went to Uni here): https://users.ece.cmu.edu/~koopman/des_s99/formal_methods/World https://en.unesco.org/commemorations/worldlogicdayMore about TerminusDB: https://terminusdb.com/Or GitHub: https://github.com/terminusdb/terminusdb
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