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Mathematics

All Audio
Updated On: Nov 04, 2023
Total Stations: 94
Total Audio Titles: 1,449

Popular “Mathematics” Stations

Breaking Math Podcast Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new!SFTM, our umbrella organization, also has another (explicit) podcast called "Nerd Forensics" all about nerd (and other) culture. Check it out wherever you get podcasts! Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support
My Favorite Theorem Join us as we spend each episode talking with a mathematical professional about their favorite result. And since the best things in life come in pairs, find out what our guest thinks pairs best with their theorem.
Now in Android This show gives listeners a quick run-down on things that the Android team has done recently that developers may want to check out. It covers library and platform releases, articles, videos, podcasts, samples, codelabs – whatever seems relevant and interesting for Android developers.

Android’s a big platform and there are many things being released all the time; listen to this podcast to stay up to date on what those things are.
Math & Physics Podcast Two university students in the math and physics program dedicated to spreading our interest in the field to the world!
Advanced Maths by Yschool This is Advanced Maths Podcast by YSchool, an online learning platform for students in India powered by Edusquare . This is hosted by Anand Arora , cofounder of Edusquare. We invite all students across the country to download our app "Yschool Learning App" available free of cost on Android during tough times that will help them in their JEE / NEET preparation.
‎Sum of All Parts Sum of All Parts tells extraordinary stories about the unseen influence that numbers have on the way we think, feel and behave.

Popular “Mathematics” Playlists

Best of STEAM Powered Voices Michele Ong, host of STEAM Powered, is proud to present the Best of STEAM Powered Voices, with fascinating and insightful content from our guests and other brilliant speakers in the extended Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics, and Medical community. STEAM Powered
Deep Dive: Ocean Conservation Learn how we can better protect our seas and marine life with interviews from scientists and other enthusiasts talking all about ocean conservation. Discover the specific challenges that face our oceans and hear about actionable solutions everyone can contribute to. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Deep Dive: Black Holes Enjoy these far-out podcasts talking all about one of the most mysterious areas of astronomy, black holes. Listen to astronomers and other experts talk about the nature of black holes and what we still don't know about them. Learn about this fascinating natural phenomenon with this collection of astronomy podcasts. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Best Science Audio On Vurbl Listen to the weirdest episodes of top science podcasts! Featuring leading experts in biology, psychology, medicine, epidemiology astronomy, computer science, and many disciplines as they share the latest & wildest scientific discoveries and developments. Includes episodes from Weather Geeks, Hidden Brain, Our Epic Ocean, STEAM Powered, and more! Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
The Human Body Listen to some of the best podcasts about anatomy and physiology here! Explore podcasts about how the human brain functions, the sensory organs, diseases, and much more. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Highlights: Agroecology and Climate Change with Dr Anika Molesworth Highlights from STEAM Powered's conversation with Dr Anika Molesworth, Farmer, Scientist, Storyteller, and related topics. STEAM Powered
Highlights: Stem Cell Biology with Rebecca Lim (#1) Highlights from STEAM Powered's conversation with Rebecca Lim, Stem Cell Biologist, and related topics. STEAM Powered
It’s an extremely complex topic with a lot to consider. This playlist tries to voice the multiple sides as fairly as possible.” id=”deep-sea-mining-a-look-at-both-sides-of-the-issue” vid=”deep-sea-mining-a-look-at-both-sides-of-the-issue” id-for-player=”deep-sea-mining-a-look-at-both-sides-of-the-issue” link=”/playlists/deep-sea-mining-a-look-at-both-sides-of-the-issue/” is-authorized=”false” csrf=”uvT5vfvHYKH8Y9K5cRi9pFqqPh57PkxxaCkUIT4mO8KGlqkRPoltQ9gbSjr18jsZ” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Deep-Sea Mining: A Look At Both Sides of the Issue Deep-sea mining, the removal of valuable minerals from the seabed, is rapidly becoming a reality.
It's an extremely complex topic with a lot to consider. This playlist tries to voice the multiple sides as fairly as possible.
The Deep-Sea Podcast
Unforgettable Moments in Space Exploration From the dawn of time, man has looked towards the stars. Today, exploring them is a reality. From the first Soviet satellite launch, to the first steps on the moon, the challenger explosion and beyond, listen to this curated playlist of unforgettable and fascinating moments throughout the history of space exploration to remind you of the journey thus far, and excite you for where mankind will travel next. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Geography Trivia Geography trivia questions from Barstool Sports' trivia show The Dozen. Watch full episodes at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5noofjAe8o&list=PLq62m2d0BaroV1pT8uo09_MVEc9XjWVlk Best of Barstool Sports

All “Mathematics” Audio

Assessment Insights and Ideas with Nadia Welcome to MathsTalk, the podcast hosted by Leanne McMahon, with special guest, the ever popular Nadia Abdelal, a highly respected Maths consultant from EM Maths Consulting. In this episode, Nadia shares insights on assessment, including triangulation, great assessment tasks, rubrics, and more. As educators, we know that assessment is not just about testing, but also about gathering meaningful data to inform our instructional practices. Nadia will shed light on how triangulation, which involves using multiple sources of evidence to assess student learning, can provide a more comprehensive picture of students' mathematical understanding. She will also discuss the importance of well-designed assessment tasks that align with learning goals and engage students in deep mathematical thinking. Whether you're a maths teacher or passionate about mathematics education, this episode provides valuable insights into assessment strategies for better understanding students' mathematical learning. Let's dive into the world of assessment with Nadia Abdelal on MathsTalk!
Resources:
To contact Nadia: https://www.emmaths.com.au/about 
To contact us: [email protected] or our Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/amsischools 
Triangulation: Oliver-Hoyo, M., & Allen, D. (2006). The use of triangulation methods in qualitative educational research. Journal of College Science Teaching, 35(4), 42–47.
https://www.madlylearning.com/assessment-and-the-triangulation-of-data/
Number talks: https://www.emmaths.com.au/post/number-talks 
https://books.google.com.au/books/about/Number_Talks.html?id=p4B9F1u2T4kC&redir_esc=y
NAPLAN Spreadsheet: Contact Nadia and she will pass on the link to the spreadsheet https://www.emmaths.com.au/about
Formulating an expression (Year 7) https://acaraweb.blob.core.windows.net/acaraweb/docs/default-source/assessment-and-reporting-publications/e6-naplan-2016-final-test-numeracy-year-7-(non-calc).pdf?sfvrsn=2 (Question 15)
Fraction Strips: https://www.math-salamanders.com/printable-fraction-strips.html
Trading game: See the classroom activity using place value houses http://amsi.org.au/teacher_modules/Using_place_value4-7.html
Michael Minas: Podcast – MathsTalk Episode 10 
Love Maths website: https://www.lovemaths.me/
Rob Vingerhoets: http://robvingerhoets.com.au/maths/
Victorian Department of Education: https://www.education.vic.gov.au/school/teachers/teachingresources/discipline/maths/Pages/maths-and-numeracy-assessment.aspx 
NSW Department of Education: https://educationstandards.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/nesa/k-10/understanding-the-curriculum/assessment
An AI Generated Love Letter Asked ChatGPT to write a romantic love letter to a boyfriend. See how cool the response is. The response is unedited.
How to make money using ChatGPT In this episode, we dive into some exciting and innovative ways to monetize the power of ChatGPT, a cutting-edge language model. From content creation to virtual assistance, online courses to personalized greeting cards, and much more – we've got you covered with 12 creative ideas! Join us as we explore how ChatGPT can be your ally in generating income. We'll share practical tips, real-life examples, and expert insights to help you unlock the potential of ChatGPT for your entrepreneurial endeavors. Whether you're a content creator, freelancer, or business owner, this episode will inspire you with fresh ideas on how to leverage ChatGPT's capabilities for financial success. So tune in now and get ready to discover the endless possibilities of making money with ChatGPT in creative and exciting ways! Don't miss out on this episode packed with valuable insights and ideas. Let's dive in and unlock the potential of ChatGPT together!
A job email generated by ChatGPT Question presented: Write an email for a software developer job in a startup. I am web developer with 5 years of experience
Factorisation for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Factorising quadratics• Completing the squareResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Factorisation• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Climate change and ready meals: Challenges for epidemiologists During the pandemic we all learnt to value the work of epidemiologists, whose mathematical models are essential in giving us an idea of where an epidemic might be heading. But just as there's a wide range of infectious diseases apart from COVID, so there's also a wide range of research questions epidemiologists ask.
In this podcast we talk to researchers Helena Stage and Laura Guzmán-Rincón about two such questions. One concerns the fact that a warming climate allows disease-carrying mosquitoes to live in places they previously found too cold. The other asks how you might detect a hidden outbreak of food poisoning coming, for example, from ready meals having been contaminated way back in the production chain. Both require clever mathematical ideas and ingenious detective work.      

Helena and Laura are members of the JUNIPER modelling consortium. We met them at a JUNIPER research meeting which took place at the University of Warwick in March 2023.
This podcast is part of our collaboration with JUNIPER, the Joint UNIversity Pandemic and Epidemic Response modelling consortium.
JUNIPER comprises academics from the universities of Cambridge, Warwick, Bristol, Exeter, Oxford, Manchester, and Lancaster, who are using a range of mathematical and statistical techniques to address pressing question about the control of COVID-19. You can see more content produced with JUNIPER here.
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Mental Arithmetic: It's All In Your Head My guest is Rob Eastaway. Author of many books which make maths more interesting and accessible. He also has a podcast called Puzzling Maths with Andrew Jeffrey which you should check out if by some miracle you’re not getting all your maths vitamins from here.
His most recent book is Maths on the back of an Envelope and it’s about the surprising power of mental arithmetic. Along the way, finding out,how to tell the height of a tree using the remains of a savoury snack, estimating crowds, dividing restaurant bills, counting weddings, getting a rough idea of what’s going on using Rob’s favourite word: -ish
And generally hopefully, giving us all a bit of confidence to get the answer wrong but close enough.
At the very end Ruby takes his advice on board and just start adding stuff up out of the blue. Well not out of the blue, off the milk carton.
Follow me on twitter @colmoregan, the podcast @functionroompod.
Rob is at https://robeastaway.com/
Timandra Harkness – presenter, writer, comedian and Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society – told our friends Dan Aspel and Maha Kaouri her favourite maths joke in this episode of the Living Proof podcast from the Isaac Newton Institute for M” id=”68UuTajy8EM” vid=”68UuTajy8EM” id-for-player=”68UuTajy8EM” link=”/listen/living-proof-timandra-harkness-how-to-make-maths-funny-68UuTajy8EM/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Living Proof: Timandra Harkness – How to make maths funny "What's a statistician's favourite sandwich filling?…"
Timandra Harkness – presenter, writer, comedian and Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society – told our friends Dan Aspel and Maha Kaouri her favourite maths joke in this episode of the Living Proof podcast from the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences.

Timandra Harkness
 
Timandra brilliantly chaired several sessions of the Communicating mathematics for the public event at the Newton Gateway to Mathematics. In this podcast Timandra spoke about how to make maths funny, and how she came to fall in love with mathematics from an arts and humanities background.
Oh and the punchline to Timandra's favourite joke? You'll have to listen to the podcast to find out!
 
00:00 – Introduction
00:44 – Welcome, discussing Communicating mathematics for the public
03:38 – Origins of Timandra's interest in maths, understanding "enough to ask the right questions"
07:50 – Discussing Timandra's book Big Data – Does Size Matter?
11:10 – Other current projects and shows, writing another book about "why everything is personalised"
13:13 – Mingling an arts background with a mathematics focus, "coming out as a closet mathematician"
17:10 – How do you make maths funny as a comedian? … "What's a statistician's favourite sandwich filling?"
21:10 – Future projects
 
This podcast was inspired by the Communicating mathematics for the public event at the Newton Gateway to Mathematics in January 2023.
 
(If that joke tickles your funny bone – try this one!)
 
This podcast is part of our collaboration with the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI) – you can find all the content from our collaboration here. The INI is an international research centre and our neighbour here on the University of Cambridge's maths campus. It attracts leading mathematical scientists from all over the world, and is open to all. Visit www.newton.ac.uk to find out more.
That’s like discovering A NEW TYPE OF STAR
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All We Hear Is: Radio Pulsar This week on the function room, my guest is Professor Jocelyn Bell Burnell, astrophysicist from Northern Ireland who, as a postgraduate student, discovered a NEW TYPE OF STAR.
That’s like discovering A NEW TYPE OF STAR
Jocelyn was a postgraduate student at the time and famously her supervisor was awarded the Nobel Prize for radio pulsars, and there was no mention of Jocelyn. Even though she helped build the Interplanetary Scintillation Array – the thing that found it- over two years and she was the one who first noticed the weird data the was the radio pulsar, sometimes reviewing nearly 100ft of paper.
That is just one part of a long career and distinguished career. We talk about that and sexism in science, religion in science, and the perils of managing big data 1960s style and at the end inspired by Jocelyn, my daughters and I look up at the stars.

#maths #simplemaths#permutations” id=”4DIopVQ1P7X” vid=”4DIopVQ1P7X” id-for-player=”4DIopVQ1P7X” link=”/listen/permutations-ii-mathematics-simplified-4DIopVQ1P7X/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
PERMUTATIONS -II – Mathematics Simplified Understanding the concept of Permutations using examples is the best way to get the idea in a concrete method. Let's keep learning and understanding the process by doing this work on a regular basis.

#maths #simplemaths#permutations
Roots and powers for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Roots• Simplifying roots• PowersResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Roots-and-powers• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Simplification for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Collecting like terms• Expanding bracketsResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Simplification• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Joseph Fourier, the Heat Equation and the Age of the Earth Joseph Bennish, Professor Emeritus of California State University, Long Beach, joins us for an excursion into physics and some of the mathematics it inspired. Joseph Fourier straddled mathematics and physics. Here we focus on his heat equation, based on partial differential equations. Partial differential equations have broad applications. Fourier developed not only the heat equation but also a way to solve it. This equation was used to answer, among other questions, the issue of the age of the earth. Was the earth too young to make Darwin's theory credible?



Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/the-art-of-mathematics/message
Back Once Again For The Renegade Masters Student After a long hiatus, the function room is back and for the first episode, comedian and erstwhile mathsy type Dara O'Briain is the guest. We chat about all sorts, hard sums, looking at the stars, the fantasy of one day going back to learn 'just for the sake of it' and then agreeing that idea might need a bit more thought. And no he didn't do a masters but I make no apologies for embellishments for the sake of a pun.
Living Proof: Hannah Thomas – Making data accessible Having empathy with your audience – with all your audiences – is the first step for making your content accessible. Hannah Thomas of the Government Analysis Function explained this in her brilliant talk at the Communicating mathematics for the public event at the Newton Gateway to Mathematics. Hannah's talk was full of insights and practical ideas on how to make all content published online easy to access and use for all users, regardless of impairment, medical condition or disability.
Our friends Dan Aspel and Maha Kaouri spoke to Hannah for this episode of the Living Proof podcast from the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences. Hannah told them about her work helping to make government data more accessible, the common pitfalls of data accessibility and tips and tricks that can help. They also find our why more people used to get married at the end of the tax year…

Hannah Thomas speaking at the Communicating mathematics for the public event
 
00:00 – Introduction
00:44 – Welcome, discussing “Communicating Mathematics for the Public” (“as entertaining as Disneyland Paris and definitely more inspiring”)
04:20 – All about Government Analysis Function, a love of data journalism, career history
13:35 – Visualising data and making digital information accessible
21:40 – Common accessibility pitfalls
24:20 – Plans for the future… e-learning resources
 
This podcast was inspired by the Communicating mathematics for the public event at the Newton Gateway to Mathematics in January 2023. For more information we strongly recommend you watch Hannah's talk from that event, Data Visualisation and Digital Accessibility: What We Can Do to Help.
 
This podcast is part of our collaboration with the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI) – you can find all the content from our collaboration here. The INI is an international research centre and our neighbour here on the University of Cambridge's maths campus. It attracts leading mathematical scientists from all over the world, and is open to all. Visit www.newton.ac.uk to find out more.
More on observational type theory I continue discussing the Puject and Tabareau paper, "Observational Equality — Now for Good", in particular discussing more about how the equality type simplifies based on its index (which is the type of the terms being equated by the equality type), and how proofs of equalities can be used to cast terms from one type to another.Also, in exciting news, I created a Telegram group that you can join if you want to discuss topics related to the podcast or particularly podcast episodes.  I will be monitoring the group.  I believe you have to request to join, and then I approve (it might take me until later in the day to do that, just fyi).  The invitation link is here.
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Living Proof: Communicating from the frontiers of mathematics We are very happy to work closely with our neighbours, the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI), to help explain, celebrate and publicise the research that happens at the Institute. But what challenges does that present? And why should it happen in the first place?
Following on from the Communicating mathematics for the public event at the Newton Gateway to Mathematics we spoke to the INI's Dan Aspel about our work in this episode of the Living Proof podcast. You can find all the content from our collaboration here.

Communicating from the mathematical frontiers – from plotting a path to the highest peak to exploring the hidden depths.
 
 
 
00:00 – Introduction
00:44 – Welcome, discussing Communicating Mathematics for the Public, the importance of trustworthiness
05:30 – Who you're speaking to vs what you're saying
07:38 – Making higher mathematics accessible to audiences: "any bit of mathematics either comes from somewhere, or is going somewhere, or both"
14:20 – Are there incommunicable subjects?
16:55 – The rarity of maths "headlines"
19:25 – The partnership between INI and Plus magazine – why is it important?
23:25 – Are some topics inherently more interesting?
25:26 – What is the end goal of maths communication? "I would love it if people could see how maths is everywhere… that maths is a language of rhythms and patterns"
30:00 – Looking to the future
This podcast was inspired by the Communicating mathematics for the public event at the Newton Gateway to Mathematics in January 2023. You can watch our talk from that event, Trust, time and truth, that was about our collaboration with JUNIPER modelling consortium.
This podcast is part of our collaboration with the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI) – you can find all the content from our collaboration here. The INI is an international research centre and our neighbour here on the University of Cambridge's maths campus. It attracts leading mathematical scientists from all over the world, and is open to all. Visit www.newton.ac.uk to find out more.
Algebra for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Order of calculations• RoundingResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Algebra• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
On the mathematical frontline: Tom Irving Here at Plus, we were very grateful for Tom Irving's work during the COVID-19 pandemic. He was the Co-Head of the secretariat of the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Modelling group (otherwise known as SPI-M). One of his responsibilities was writing the consensus statements that came out of SPI-M, summarising current understanding of the mathematical advice to the UK government. We found these incredibly useful when reporting on the pandemic.
We finally met Tom when we were both speaking at the Communicating mathematics for the public event in January 2023 at the Newton Gateway to Mathematics in Cambridge. In this podcast Tom tells us about providing a bridge between policy and mathematics, the importance of transparency, and the joy of the R number being discussed at the hairdressers.

This episode is part of On the mathematical frontline, a special series of the Plus podcast which explores the work of mathematicians grappling with the unprecedented challenge of studying a live pandemic unfolding in front of their eyes. In this series we interview our colleagues in the JUNIPER modelling consortium, whose research and insights have fed into SPI-M and SAGE – the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, both of whom advise the UK government on the scientific aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
You can watch Tom's talk on the Challenges in Communicating the Results of SAGE's Covid Modelling, and you can find all our work covering COVID-19 here.
This podcast is part of our collaboration with JUNIPER, the Joint UNIversity Pandemic and Epidemic Response modelling consortium.
JUNIPER comprises academics from the universities of Cambridge, Warwick, Bristol, Exeter, Oxford, Manchester, and Lancaster, who are using a range of mathematical and statistical techniques to address pressing question about the control of COVID-19. You can see more content produced with JUNIPER here.
Combining vectors for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Combining vectorsResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Combining-vectors• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Introduction to Observational Type Theory In this episode, I introduce an important paper by Pujet and Tabareau, titled "Observational Equality: Now for Good", that develops earlier work of McBride, Swierstra, and Altenkirch (which I will cover in a later episode) on a new approach to making a type theory extensional.  The idea is to have equality types reduce, within the theory, to statements of extensional equality for the type of the values being equated.
Interjection: The Liquid Tensor Experiment I pause the chapter on extensionality in type theory to talk about something very exciting that I just learned about (though the project was completed Summer 2022): the so-called Liquid Tensor Experiment, to formalize a recent very difficult proof by a mathematician named Peter Scholze, in Lean.  This is the first time in history, that I know of, when a theorem was formalized in a theorem prover, in order to resolve doubts of the mathematician who proved it.  An amazing achievement.  This episode tells the story, as I have understood it on line.  The result apparently sparked this recent workshop.
77: An Interview with Christopher Roblesz of MathNMore Christopher Roblesz is a math educator who, until the pandemic, worked as a teacher. It was his experiences during the pandemic, and his unwavering passion for preparing disadvantaged youth for STEM careers, that eventually led him to developing mathnmore, a company focused on providing an enriched educational experience for sstudents who are preparing for these careers.More on energy and entropy next time!All of this and more on this interview episode of Breaking Math![Featuring: Sofia Baca; Christopher Roblesz]
Vectors for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Vector magnitudeResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Vectors• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Sexual statistics If you've ever been lucky enough to meet David Spiegelhalter, or hear him talk in person or on TV or radio, you'll know he tells a great story. And the stories he told in his 2015 book Sex by numbers were fascinating and highly entertaining, as well giving us the tools to critically assess the statistics we read every day in the news. And sex is back in the news as the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles that featured in his book is being conducted again this year. Who knows what stories will come out of the next survey?

We were very happy to start 2023 with catching up with David (the first time in person since the pandemic!) at the Communicating mathematics for the public event that we were both speaking at in the Newton Gateway to Mathematics in Cambridge. We hope you enjoy this interview with him from 2015, where he gives us some of his favourite snippets from the book, and some easy ways you can think more critically about statistics. (You can also watch our interview as a video or read the associated article.)
PERMUTATIONS A very important and interesting topic in Mathematics is Permutations using which we can find the number of ways of doing a certain thing where numbers are being used, words are being made, signals or signs are made. We use the very important factorial notation here. Let's keep learning.
The Ten Most Important Theorems in Mathematics, Part II Jim Stein, Professor Emeritus of CSULS, returns to complete his (admittedly subjective) list of the ten greatest math theorems of all time, with fascinating insights and anecdotes for each. Last time he did the runners up and numbers 8, 9 and 10. Here he completes numbers 1 through 7, again ranging over geometry, trig, calculus, probability, statistics, primes and more.



Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-art-of-mathematics/message
Great, easy and flexible classroom activities. Host Leanne McMahon has a long awaited discussion with Maths educator and former AMSI Schools Mathematics Advisor Cass Lowry about great Maths activities that are flexible enough to be done in the classroom, in hybrid mode or via remote learning. This conversation took place when schools were moving to remote learning daily and teachers needed to be able to switch easily and without taking hours in preparation.
The activities are as timely today as they were then and Cass gives some fabulous ideas on how they can be used in both primary and secondary settings.
Cass can be contacted via Twitter @Cass_Lowry
Contact us on [email protected] with any comments, queries or suggestions
Remote and Classroom Learning Resources
 Which one doesn’t belong? A shapes book ~ Christopher Danielson (2016) Stenhouse Publishers
Which one doesn’t belong? http://wodb.ca/
How many? A counting book ~ Christopher Danielson (2018) Stenhouse Publishers
Talking Math With Your Kids: https://talkingmathwithkids.com/
Christopher Danielson @Trianglemancsd
Search Twitter: #tmwyk #unitchat #WODB
Same or Different ~ Meaningful Math Moments (Jennifer Barker) http://www.meaningfulmathmoments.com/same-or-different.html
Same or Different Examples (Brian Bushart) https://samedifferentimages.wordpress.com/
Brian Bushart @bstockus
Search Twitter for: #samediffmath #ElemMathChat

 
Dan Finkel – Number Talks https://mathforlove.com/lesson/number-talks/
Dan Finkel @MathForLove
Nat Banting – Fraction Talks http://fractiontalks.com/
Nat Banting @NatBanting
Number Talks – YouCubed (Jo Boaler) https://www.youcubed.org/resources/stanford-onlines-learn-math-teachers-parents-number-talks/
Mathematical Number Talks http://www.mathnumbertalks.com/resources/
Number Strings: https://numberstrings.com/what-is-a-number-string/

 
Steve Wyborney – Subitizing Slides https://stevewyborney.com/2018/09/100-subitizing-slides-10-challenge-patterns/
Steve Wyborney – Splat! https://stevewyborney.com/2018/09/splat-for-google-slides-40-lessons/
Steve Wyborney – Esti-Mysteries https://stevewyborney.com/2019/09/51-esti-mysteries/
Steve Wyborney @SteveWyborney

 
Robert Kaplinsky – Open Middle https://www.openmiddle.com/
Robert Kaplinsky @robertkaplinsky and @openmiddle

 
 
Pam Harris – MathStratChat Examples https://www.mathisfigureoutable.com/mathstratchat
Pam Harris @pwharris
Search Twitter: #MathStratChat

 
Berkeley Everett – Number Search https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipPUhHweMG3cpSQ2CRL0scB2KtIKi2D6UFLrLtVuBNpr_z-UWsqce6nzZGmkWi5UWA?key=QlZfb2Rtd05vbXRiVklUSldiUGVTSVMxd2hINXJn
Berkeley Everett @BerkeleyEverett
Simon Gregg @Simon_Gregg
Search Twitter: #numbersearch

 
Great Maths Instructional Videos
Howie Hua https://www.youtube.com/c/HowieHua1/

James Tan
Applications of trigonometry for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Area of an irregular triangle• Sine rule• Cosine ruleResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Applications-of-trigonometry• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Episode 83 – Cihan Bahran Evelyn Lamb: Hello, and welcome to My Favorite Theorem, the math podcast with no quiz at the end. I'm Evelyn Lamb, one of your co-hosts, coming to you from snowy Salt Lake City, Utah, where I feel like I've said that the past few times we've been taping. Which is great, because we really need the water. It is beautiful today, and I am ever so grateful that the life of a freelance writer does not require me to drive in conditions like this, especially as someone who grew up in Texas where conditions like this did not exist, and so I am extremely unconfident in snow and ice. So yeah, coming to you from the opposite side of the weather spectrum is our other host.

Kevin Knudson: I’m Kevin Knudson, professor of mathematics at the University of Florida. It's true. It's the opposite end of the spectrum, but hey, you know, I was putting up my Christmas tree the week before last and I was sweating. So this is my reality.


EL: Yeah.


KK: It’s hard to get in the mood, you know, you put on the Christmas music and you you get the tree out of the attic. And then I'm in, like, shorts and a t-shirt and sweating.


EL: You can sympathize with Australians, who have to deal with that every single year.


KK: That’s right. That's right. Yeah. So anyway, we're looking forward to a nice holiday. My son's going to come home after Boxing Day because he has a part time job at a bookstore in Vancouver and his boss said no one gets Boxing Day off.


EL: Yeah, that's that's a thing in some places.


KK: In the Commonwealth. I think it's a big thing. Right? So yeah, he'll be home on the 28th. So we're looking forward to that. But anyway, anyway, this will be after this will be after the holidays when people hear this anyway. So they'll go, gee, I wonder how that went?


EL: Yeah. Waiting with bated breath for updates about your son’s Boxing Day experience.


KK: That’s right. That's right.


Yes. Well, today we are very happy to have on the show Cihan Bahran, coming to us from I don't know what kind of weather. So yeah, could you introduce yourself and tell us about the local conditions?


Cihan Bahran: Yeah. Thanks for having me. I am joining you from Ankara, Turkey, which is the capital of Turkey in the middle. So it's a continental climate, I would say. But it has been rather mild. We haven't had any snow yet or really anything that close to freezing temperature. So yeah, it's chilly, but yeah, I like it.


EL: Yeah. And so what what kind of math are you interested in


CB: Right. So I am interested in representation theory, especially with functorial methods, and I am doing a postdoc here about that at this at this time. So actually, maybe I'm at a little bit of a disadvantage in that the theorem I will share is not necessarily directly from my expertise, so I'm not really, maybe on top of the literature or the methods, but I thought I would pick that because I find it really interesting.


EL: Sometimes, honestly, that could be a little better, because we are also not experts in that.


KK: That’s right. Yeah.


EL: But yeah, and you run a Twitter account, and I meant to look up the exact — is it called some theorems?


CB: Yeah, it's called some some theorems. The username is something like Cihan posts theorems [Editor’s note: It’s @CihanPostsThms] Okay, let me talk about that a bit. So I guess it goes back to maybe 2020 or something, not this account, so that was the pandemic time and for me, maybe psychologically a difficult time that I was seeking out somewhere to connect with the math world. And I found initially a Facebook page called Theorems. And it is it is still running, I guess. But I started posting there. And I had a lot of, like, some bits of knowledge about some interesting theorems that I would, like, share with my friends. And it became like, I was almost daily posting, like the group became dominated by my posts, to the point that people started asking, like, what are you really doing, et cetera. And then maybe since last year, I've been more on Twitter, and I posted some of these on my personal Twitter account. But then for some reasons, I had to make my personal account private. And at some point, I thought I might repost these things that I have had collected, because that group in Facebook was actually a private group, not everyone can see it before joining. And I thought I would post those on Twitter, and I find it, like, when it gets some responses, it's like a dopamine hit for me.


KK: Sure.


CB: And I was actually almost aggressively posting in the summer because I had all this sort of backlog. And at this point in time, I have posted most of the past stu
Trigonometric identities for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Trigonometric identities• Trigonometric equationsResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Trigonometric-identities• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Area and volume for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Pythagoras’ theorem• Arcs and sectors• VolumeResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Area-and-volume• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Angles for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Angles in polygons• Angles in circlesResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Angles• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Extensional Martin-Loef Type Theory In this episode, I discuss the basic distinguishing rule of Extensional Martin-Loef Type Theory, namely equality reflection.  This rule says that propositional equality implies definitional equality.  Algorithmically, it would imply that the type checker should do arbitrary proof search during type checking, to see if two expressions are definitionally equal.  This immediately gives us undecidability of type checking for the theory, at least as usually realized.

Back in March and April 2020 one thing was on everybody’s mi” id=”AoJz53ZKurU” vid=”AoJz53ZKurU” id-for-player=”AoJz53ZKurU” link=”/listen/looking-back-at-our-first-glimpse-of-the-virus-with-david-spiegelhalter-AoJz53ZKurU/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Looking back at our first glimpse of the virus: with David Spiegelhalter Today, 23 March 2022, marks two years since the UK locked down for the first time in the COVID-19 pandemic.  We relaunch the Plus podcast by looking back to where our pandemic coverage all began, by revisiting our podcast from April 2020.

Back in March and April 2020 one thing was on everybody's mind: the novel coronavirus – now better known as COVID-19. In this podcast we spoke to two people who have become very familiar to many of us over the last two years.  We reported on our first COVID-19 conversation with Julia Gog, an epidemiologist who has been informing the Science Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE).  Julia is now a close collaborator with us here at Plus as part of the JUNIPER modelling consortium (as we'll find out in the next podcast).  We also spoke with David Spiegelhalter, Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication, who is now a familiar figure through his frequent appearance on radio, TV and in print giving clear and calm explanations about the numbers behind the pandemic.  David told us about how to communicate science during a crisis.  And, at the end of the podcast, we had a go at explaining the maths of herd immunity in one minute.
To find out more about the topics covered in this podcast see:
Communicating the coronavirus crisis
How can maths fight a pandemic?
A call to action on COVID-19
Taking the pandemic temperature
And you can find out much more in all our other coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic

The music in this podcast comes from the band eusa. The track is called Now we are all SoB's.
On the mathematical frontline: Julia Gog Over the last two years we have done a lot of reporting on the maths of the COVID-19 pandemic. Behind the maths there are of course people — those mathematicians who make the epidemiological models that do (and sometimes do not do not) inform government policy, who are grappling with the unprecedented challenge of coming to grips with a live pandemic unfolding in front of their eyes.
Our special podcast series, On the mathematical frontline, is about those people. It explores the maths they do, how they go about it, and the impact it has on their personal lives.

The first person we spoke to for this series back in February 2021 was Julia Gog, Professor of Mathematical Biology at the University of Cambridge, participant of SAGE and member of the epidemic modelling group SPI-M.
Gog is also a founding member of the JUNIPER modelling consortium we are collaborating with, and which you'll hear more about in the podcast.
So what is it like working on the mathematical frontline? Find out more with Julia Gog!
On the mathematical frontline: Mike Tildesley Mike Tildesley is now a professor in the Zeeman Institute for Systems Biology and Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research at the University of Warwick  – but he started out doing a PhD in astrophysics, which is far literally and mathematically from studying the spread of diseases. We talked to Mike in July 2021 about his unusual route into epidemiology, the work he's doing on the pandemic, and about the highs and lows of working on the mathematical frontline.

 
Mike is a member of the  JUNIPER modelling consortium, and a member of the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Modelling group (SPI-M) that advises the government on the scientific aspects of the pandemic.  This is the second episode of our special podcast series On the mathematical frontline, where we talk to the mathematicians working on the COVID-19 pandemic. We explore the maths they do, how they go about it, and what impact their work on the pandemic has had on their lives.

Ellen and Leon are both both from th” id=”AYbHRMH5PMh” vid=”AYbHRMH5PMh” id-for-player=”AYbHRMH5PMh” link=”/listen/on-the-mathematical-frontline-ellen-brooks-pollock-and-leon-danon-AYbHRMH5PMh/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
On the mathematical frontline: Ellen Brooks Pollock and Leon Danon Like many couples, Ellen Brooks Pollock and Leon Danon, have had to make it through the pandemic juggling lockdowns, child care and work.  But unlike many of us, they have also both been working together on the mathematical front line of the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Ellen and Leon are both both from the University of Bristol. The are members of the JUNIPER consortium of modelling groups from across the UK whose research and insights feed into the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Modelling group (otherwise known as SPI-M) and SAGE, the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, both of which advise the UK government on the scientific aspects of the pandemic.
If you or someone you loved found yourself living alone during the various lockdowns you benefitted directly from Ellen and Leon's work: as we find out in the podcast, it was their work on household bubbling which showed that these support bubbles were safe.
We spoke to Ellen and Leon in July 2021 for our special podcast series On the mathematical front line.  The series features epidemiologists whose efforts have been crucial in the fight against the pandemic. They are the people who make sense of the data to estimate things like the R number, and who make the mathematical models that inform (and sometimes do not inform) government policy.
In this podcast we are really pleased to talk to Ed Hill, a member of the  modelling consortium from the University of Warwi” id=”4biCz38SwNv” vid=”4biCz38SwNv” id-for-player=”4biCz38SwNv” link=”/listen/on-the-mathematical-frontline-ed-hill-4biCz38SwNv/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
On the mathematical frontline: Ed Hill The Mathematical frontline podcast is about the mathematicians who are grappling with the unprecedented challenge of studying a live pandemic unfolding in front of their eyes.
In this podcast we are really pleased to talk to Ed Hill, a member of the  modelling consortium from the University of Warwick, where he is also part of the Zeeman Institute for Systems Biology & Infectious Disease Epidemiology Research group (SBIDER). Ed tells us about his journey through the pandemic, his contribution to keeping work places and universities safe, and the importance of pacing yourself.
 
 
 
To read about some of the work Ed mentions in this podcast see the articles Pandemics and psychology and COVID-19 and universities: What do we know?
This podcast was produced as part of our collaborations with JUNIPER, the Joint UNIversity Pandemic and Epidemic Response modelling consortium, and the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI).
On the mathematical frontline: Francesca Scarabel Like many early career researchers, Francesca Scarabel has moved around the world to take the first steps in her career: from her home in Italy, to Finland for her PhD, to Hungary and Canada for postdoctoral research.  Now she works at the University of Manchester as part of the JUNIPER modelling consortium.

We spoke to Francesca about what it's like being part of the mathematical emergency response, the importance of local knowledge, and not being afraid to share your ideas.
You can read more about the work Francesca mentions in this podcast in Understanding waning immunity.
This podcast was produced as part of our collaboration with the JUNIPER, the Joint UNIversity Pandemic and Epidemic Response modelling consortium.
La La Lab: A tour through maths and music Although people often talk about the links between maths and music, if you're neither a mathematician nor a musician these links might not be that obvious. In this podcast we get to explore the connection by going on a tour of the La La Lab exhibition with curator Daniel Ramos, talk to Jürgen Richter-Gebert, who created some of the exhibits, and asked Andreas Matt about the work of Imaginary, the group that produced this exhibition.

We were lucky enough to visit the La La Lab exhibition in person when it opened in September 2019 as part of the Heidelberg Laureate Forum. You might not be able to visit in person today, but you can still visit the exhibition virtually at Imaginary.
You can find out more about maths and music, Fourier analysis, Fibonacci, Manjul Bhargava and the Heidelberg Laureate Forum on Plus. And you can find detailed mathematical explanations of the La La Lab exhibitions in their excellent exhibition booklet.
(The image in this podcast is of the Tonnetz exhibit at the La La Lab Exhibition Image © Wanda Domínguez / Imaginary)

The quantum world is usually associated with the weirder end of physics, including strange phenomena like superposition or quantum entanglement, the "spooky action at a distance" as Einstein called i” id=”6EvivpV6kvw” vid=”6EvivpV6kvw” id-for-player=”6EvivpV6kvw” link=”/listen/flying-home-with-quantum-physics-6EvivpV6kvw/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Flying home with quantum physics In this week's podcast we reach into our archive for a favourite story we first heard back in 2010!

The quantum world is usually associated with the weirder end of physics, including strange phenomena like superposition or quantum entanglement, the "spooky action at a distance" as Einstein called it. But it turns out that quantum mechanical processes occur in living systems too. Some species of birds use quantum mechanics to navigate and studying how they do it might actually help us with building quantum computers.
Back in 2010 we spoke to the physicists Simon Benjamin and Erik Gauger at the conference Quantum Physics and the Nature of Reality at the University of Oxford to find out more.
For more information you can read our ridiculously short introduction to some basic quantum mechanics, and the accompanying article for this podcast.
How to predict a changing climate How do you go about predicting something as complex as the Earth's climate? In this podcast — featuring climate modelling experts Emily Shuckburgh and Chris Budd — we explore what those climate models look like, the uncertainties involved in climate modelling, and also why the predictions need to be taken seriously despite those uncertainties.
We also look at the simplest climate model of them all— the energy balance model — and explain the famous butterfly effect in just one minute.

Emily Shuckburgh is a mathematician and climate scientist and Director of Cambridge Zero. The podcast features clips from Emily Shuckburgh's talk at the Cambridge Festival in March 2021, which was hosted by the Isaac Newton Institute in Cambridge. You can watch the full talk here.
Chris Budd OBE is a Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Bath, who works on climate models. You can read Budd's Plus article about climate modelling here.
New ways of seeing with the INTEGRAL project It's amazing what you can see now thanks to remote imaging technology! Visiting far away landscapes via satellite images or watching live feeds from a famous street is fun, but remotely gathered images offer exciting opportunities to map and observe the world. The problem is that the vast amount of remotely gathered data now available is useless on its own – we need to have the means to analyse and extract information from those images.
This is exactly what the members of the INTEGRAL project, researchers based at the University of Cambridge and researchers and industry partners in India, are working on. This is an innovative collaboration between people collecting remote sensing data – such as satellite images of forests and video from traffic cameras – and researchers developing the technology to analyse those remotely gathered images to answer meaningful questions.
 

Some of the members of the INTEGRAL team who spoke to us over zoom. From top left: Carola-Bibiane Schönlieb, James Woodcock, Angelica Aviles-Rivero, Saurabh Pandey, Sanjay Bisht, Debmita Bandyopadhyay, Rihuan Ke, David Coomes.
 
In this podcast we talk to some of the members of the INTEGRAL team about the innovative machine learning approaches they are developing to understand remotely gathered images, and the significant impact these technologies can have on the world. Our thanks to Carola-Bibiane Schönlieb, James Woodcock, Angelica Aviles Rivero, Debmita Bandyopadhyay, Rihuan Ke and David Coomes, all from the University of Cambridge, and to Saurabh Pandey from KritiKal Solutions and Sanjay Bisht from IORA Ecological Solutions, both based in India.
You can read more about the INTEGRAL team's work in Seeing traffic through new eyes and about their new AI approaches in Maths in a minute: Semi-supervised machine learning. And you can find much more information about machine learning and image analysis on Plus.
We are very pleased to be collaborating with the wonderful  Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI) in Cambridge. Recently Plus editors Marianne Freiberger and Rachel Thomas ” id=”3jjJvLG2hGZ” vid=”3jjJvLG2hGZ” id-for-player=”3jjJvLG2hGZ” link=”/listen/living-proof-collaborating-with-the-isaac-newton-institute-3jjJvLG2hGZ/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Living Proof: Collaborating with the Isaac Newton Institute Have you every wondered about what goes on behind the scenes of Plus? Find out in this special guest episode! 
We are very pleased to be collaborating with the wonderful  Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI) in Cambridge. Recently Plus editors Marianne Freiberger and Rachel Thomas appeared on the INI's Living Proof podcast, talking to the INI's communication's manager Dan Aspel. 
We talked to Dan about mathematical journalism, spreading a love of numbers, and our new collaboration with the INI. Topics touched upon include our late boss, the wonderful John Barrow, the many joys of being a maths communicator, and the thrill that comes from finding and inspiring audiences with the most unusual of subjects.
Thank you to Dan and the INI for allowing us to host this episode of Living Proof on our podcast.   You can find all the content from our collaboration with the INI here.

00:00 – Introduction
00:47 – Welcome
01:30 – A little background about Marianne
04:05 – A little background about Rachel
07:12 – A tribute to John Barrow
08:36 – Choosing communication over research
11:40 – Who is the average +Plus reader?
13:25 – The appeal of +Plus
17:05 – “Maths and hallucinations” (an article with “quite interesting comments”)
22:05 – Collaborating with INI
30:32 – Plans for the future
32:45 – Terrible coffee… but good conversation
Reducing NHS waiting lists in the wake of COVID Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for men in the UK and second most for women. During the first lockdown from March 2020, elective cardiac procedures and outpatient consultations were postponed and many appointments have not yet been rescheduled. In addition, those who were suffering from heart conditions did not see their GP or come to hospital. The resulting backlog presents a huge challenge.
In this podcast, first published in March 2021, we talk to cardiologist Ramesh Nadarajah and computer scientist Jessica Enright about a meeting at the Newton Gateway to Mathematics, which brought together clinicians and mathematicians to try to tackle the problem.

The three-day brainstorming session, part of a programme of activities by the Virtual Forum for Knowledge Exchange in Mathematical Sciences, developed potential solutions that could also help reduce waiting lists for other conditions — and demonstrated the astonishing power mathematics can have even when you least expect it.
This podcast, and the accompanying article, were produced as part of our collaboration with the Isaac Newton Institute (INI), which we talked about in our last episode.  You can find out more of our work with the INI here.
Ma” id=”6wPMn1QOOsG” vid=”6wPMn1QOOsG” id-for-player=”6wPMn1QOOsG” link=”/listen/on-the-mathematical-frontline-matt-keeling-6wPMn1QOOsG/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
On the mathematical frontline: Matt Keeling "We all work with exponential growth and we're really, really used to it, but we are still amazed at how fast things take off at the end." This is epidemiologist Matt Keeling talking about how a disease outbreak can still take you by surprise even if you've been working in the field for 25 years.
Matt's team at the University of Warwick has been running one of the main models that have informed UK government on the COVID-19 pandemic. In this podcast Matt tells us about his work on the roadmap out of lockdown, whether the models have been too pessimistic, and what it's been like producing scientific results that carry so much weight.

This episode is part of On the mathematical frontline, a special series of the Plus podcast which explores the work of mathematicians grappling with the unprecedented challenge of studying a live pandemic unfolding in front of their eyes.    In this series we interview our colleagues in the JUNIPER modelling consortium, whose research and insights have fed into the Scientific Pandemic Influenza Modelling group (otherwise known as SPI-M) and the now familiar SAGE – the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies , both of whom advise the UK government on the scientific aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
To find out more about the work of Matt's team on the roadmap out of lockdown, see this article. You can see all of our content related to JUNIPER here.
Living Proof: Anita Layton – one of Canada’s most powerful women In this episode we meet the irrepressible Anita Layton. As well as leading a busy research team, Anita also spends much of her downtime fostering diversity and mentorships throughout her networks, and is professionally engaged across disciplines as distinct as applied mathematics, computer science and the medical sciences. She was also voted one of 2021’s top 100 “Canada’s most powerful women”.

 
We are very pleased to host this episode of the Living Proof podcast as part of our collaboration with the wonderful  Isaac Newton Institute.  Plus editor, Marianne Freiberger,  joined the INI's Dan Aspel to interview the irrepressible Prof Anita Layton of the University of Waterloo, when she was a guest at INI for a week-long workshop on kinetic theory.  You can find out more about this fascinating area of maths on Plus.
Thank you to Dan and the INI for allowing us to host this episode of Living Proof on our podcast.   You can find all the content from our collaboration with the INI here.
00:00 – Introduction
00:58 – Welcome
01:50 – Attending the “Frontiers in kinetic equations for plasmas and collective behaviour” workshop
06:44 – How do you stay on top of multiple fields? (“I don’t always understand every single slide in a talk!”)
12:50 – Fostering diversity in the sciences, connecting mentorships between different generations of female mathematicians
17:30 – Mathematics for “social good”? (“It excites me to do something that has meaning, that is impactful”)
19:16 – A personal history in the sciences, “I told you I don’t have a math degree. Let me tell you why…”
24:00 – Connecting kinetic theory, kidneys, blood flow and more
The maths and magic of shuffling We all have our favoured methods of shuffling cards, but most of us don't think any more about it once we've started playing a game. But there's so much more to be discovered! In this podcast mathematician Cheryl Praeger and magician Will Houstoun reveal the maths and magic behind shuffling cards. And as this podcast, first published in March 2021, was the first podcast we produced in collaboration with the Isaac Newton Institute, Dan Aspel also tells us all about the INI!

You can watch Cheryl Praeger talk about the mathematics of shuffling in her Kirk Lecture at the INI in 2020. You can be astounded by Will Houstoun's magic, including the amazing trick we mentioned in the podcast, and find out more about his work as magician in residence at the Imperial College London and Royal College of Music Centre for Performance Science, at his website. And you can read all the details behind the maths and magic of shuffling in their Plus articles: The magic of shuffling and The mathematics of shuffling.
This podcast was inspired by a talk given by Cheryl Praeger as part of the Groups, representations and applications programme at the Isaac Newton Institute. You can find out more about the maths behind this programme here.
Maths on the red carpet –Revisiting the 2018 International Congress of Mathematicians We are getting very excited – next week is the International Congress of Mathematicians  (ICM)- one of the highlights of the mathematical calendar!  The ICM takes place every four years and it’s the biggest maths conference of them all, attracting thousands of participants, and also sees the awards of some very prestigious prizes, including the famous Fields medal.
We are fortunate to have been able to interview the prize winners in advance of the conference, but that’s top secret and we won’t be revealing the winners till they are announced publicly in Helsinki next week!  We're really looking forward to sharing our interviews with you when we meet them in person in Helsinki next week, where we will also bring you all the news from the ICM itself.

But in the meantime, to get us in the mood, let's revisit the 2018 ICM that took place in Rio de Janeiro in Brazil.  It was a brilliant conference and the podcast you are about to hear was recorded on that very first days of the 2018 ICM, when all the big prizes were announced.  You can find all our coverage of the past three ICM’s by going  to plus.maths.org and searching for "ICM".  
And stay tuned for our special series of podcasts, Maths on the Red Carpet, starting next week, that will bring you all our reporting from this years International Congress of Mathematicians.  But for now – enjoy the sounds of the Brazilian forest in this podcast revisiting the exciting first days of the 2018 ICM….
Maths on the red carpet – Fields Medallist Maryna Viazovska Hello from Helsinki! We are very pleased to be bringing you coverage direct from the 2022 International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) – one of the highlights of the mathematical calendar. The ICM takes place every four years and it's usually the biggest maths conference of them all, attracting thousands of participants, and also sees the awards of some very prestigious prizes, including the famous Fields Medals.
This year's Congress is a little different – it is being held as a fully virtual event with only the prize ceremonies and lectures taking place in-person in Helsinki, Finland on 5 and 6 July. The rest of the schedule fascinating talks from across the spectrum of maths will take place online over the coming week.
In this podcast we tell you all the winners of all the prizes being announced today at the ICM and bring you an interview with one of them: Maryna Viazovska, who has won a Fields Medal for a ground-breaking result in the theory of sphere packings. Viazovska is only the second woman to receive a Fields Medal, following on from Maryam Mirzakhani, who won it in 2014.

Maryna Viazovska. Photo: Matteo Fieni.
 
You can find out more about Viazovska's work in our short introduction or our more in-depth article.
To read about the work of all the prize winners, see here. And to hear from the other Fields Medallists watch out for upcoming podcast episodes.
This content was produced as part of our collaborations with the London Mathematical Society and the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences. You can find all our content on the 2022 International Congress of Mathematicians here.

James Maynard (Photo by” id=”AlujvKm3zLL” vid=”AlujvKm3zLL” id-for-player=”AlujvKm3zLL” link=”/listen/maths-on-the-red-carpet-fields-medallist-james-maynard-AlujvKm3zLL/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Maths on the red carpet – Fields Medallist James Maynard James Maynard has won a 2022 Fields Medal for "spectacular contributions to number theory". Fields Medals count among the highest honours in mathematics and are awarded every four years at the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) to researchers up to the age of 40.

James Maynard (Photo by Ryan Cowan, used with permission)
In this podcast, which comes to you from the opening day of the ICM 2022 in Helsinki, we talk to Maynard about his love for numbers and groundbreaking progress towards something that has eluded mathematician for a very long time: a proof of the twin prime conjecture.
You can read about Maynard's work in this short introduction and this in-depth article. See here for all our coverage of the prizes awarded at the ICM 2022. And to hear from the other Fields Medallists check out existing and upcoming podcast episodes.
This content was produced as part of our collaborations with the London Mathematical Society and the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences. You can find all our content on the 2022 International Congress of Mathematicians here.
Maths on the red carpet – Fields Medallist Hugo Duminil-Copin Hugo Duminil-Copin has won a 2022 Fields Medal for his work transforming the mathematical theory of phase transitions in statistical physics. Fields Medals count among the highest honours in mathematics and are awarded every four years at the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) to researchers up to the age of 40.

Hugo Duminil-Copin (Photo Matteo Fieni, used with permission)
In this podcast, which comes to you from a beautiful lake on day two of the ICM 2022 in Helsinki, we talk to Duminil-Copin about how his work in statistical physics brings together his two loves – maths and physics.
You can read about Duminil-Copin's work in this short introduction and this in-depth article. See here for all our coverage of the prizes awarded at the ICM 2022.
This content was produced as part of our collaborations with the London Mathematical Society and the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences. You can find all our content on the 2022 International Congress of Mathematicians here.
Maths on the red carpet – Fields Medallist June Huh June Huh has won one of this year's Fields Medals at the International Congress of Mathematicians. The Fields Medal is one of the most prestigious prizes in mathematics. It is awarded every four years "to recognise outstanding mathematical achievement for existing work and for the promise of future achievement". Up to four mathematicians up to the age of 40 are awarded a Fields Medal each time.
June Huh. Photo: Lance Murphey.
In this podcast, which comes to you from the opening days of the ICM 2022 in Helsinki, we talk to Huh about is relatively late start in mathematics, about maths you can "feel and touch", and why maths mirrors who we are as a species.

You can read about Huh's work in this short introduction and this in-depth article. See here for all our coverage of the prizes awarded at the ICM 2022.
This content was produced as part of our collaborations with the London Mathematical Society and the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences. You can find all our content on the 2022 International Congress of Mathematicians here.
How the velodrome found its form To celebrate the Commonwealth Games happening this week in the UK we are visiting one of the venues, the velodrome in the Lee Valley VeloPark in London.  The velodrome, with its striking curved shape, was built for the London 2012 Olympics.  In the run up to the 2012 Olympics, we talked to structural engineers Andrew Weir and Pete Winslow from Expedition Engineering, who were part of the design team for the velodrome, about how mathematics helped create its iconic shape. 
 

Sir Chris Hoy leads the GB Cycling Team during the official opening of the Velodrome (Photograph by David Poultney)
We hope you enjoy revisiting this conversation, and you can find out more in this accompanying article. Good luck to all the athletes completing in the 2022 Commonwealth Games!

How can a machine learn to distinguish a picture of a cat from a picture of a dog?
 
At the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in 2019, Ch” id=”57qP1di0FfY” vid=”57qP1di0FfY” id-for-player=”57qP1di0FfY” link=”/listen/machine-learning-and-artificial-intelligence-57qP1di0FfY/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Machine learning and artificial intelligence Artificial intelligence and machines that train themselves might sound like a plot from a science fiction movie, but these things are already part of our everyday lives.

How can a machine learn to distinguish a picture of a cat from a picture of a dog?
 
At the Heidelberg Laureate Forum in 2019, Chris Budd, Professor of Applied Mathematics at the University of Bath, talked us through the basics of how these learning machines tick.  While Raj Reddy, Turing Award winner and artificial intelligence pioneer, talked to us about his grand challenges in artificial intelligence, and why time travel and immortality might be easier to achieve than creating a machine that rivals human intelligence.
To find out more about machine learning, its history, and some of the moral questions it raises, read the series of articles based on Chris' Gresham College lectures. 
The music in this podcast is from Oli Freke, and the track is called "Experimental 5". You can find his music at soundcloud.
This podcast, first published in August 2020, was partially funded by the European Mathematical Society.
AI, babies, and agency In this podcast, first published in August 2020, we hear from machine learning pioneer Yoshua Bengio, who believes that creating a true artificial intelligence will only be possible once machines have something that babies are born with: the ability to interact with the world, observe what happens, and adapt to the consequences of their actions.
Yoshua Bengio (Photo copyright: Heidelberg Laureate Forum Foundation)

We'll find out how such agency helps us learn, what it could mean for computers to have it too, and hear about Bengio's work introducing it into an area of machine learning called deep learning.
And, in honour of the mathematician Ron Graham who sadly passed away in July 2020, we celebrate our very favourite number, Graham's number, by telling you about it in just one minute.
You can find out more about Bengio's take on agency in this series of articles, about machine learning in this article, and about Graham's number in this article.
The music in the podcast is by Oli Freke and the track is called Line-1. You can listen to more of Oli's music on Soundcloud.
This podcast was produced as part of our collaboration with the Isaac Newton Institute (INI) – you can find out more of our work with the INI here.
On our way to the writing workshops we were running with these women” id=”6v23mNYUsGN” vid=”6v23mNYUsGN” id-for-player=”6v23mNYUsGN” link=”/listen/women-of-mathematics-natalia-berloff-6v23mNYUsGN/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Women of Mathematics: Natalia Berloff This month we had the pleasure of meeting some young female mathematicians who were just finishing up their summer research projects with the Philippa Fawcett Internship Programme and the Cambridge Mathematics Placements programme.
On our way to the writing workshops we were running with these women, we walked past six inspiring portraits of female mathematicians from Cambridge. These form part of the Women of Mathematics photo exhibition, which celebrates female mathematicians from institutions throughout Europe. When the University of Cambridge hosted the exhibition in 2017, we had the opportunity to interview these Cambridge mathematicians about their work and their mathematical lives.
In this podcast we revisit our 2017 interview with Natalia Berloff, Professor of Applied Mathematics, who told us why maths is like a treasure hunt, and shared some of her adventures in the world of maths.

 
You can see all the Cambridge portraits and find out more about the work and mathematical lives of these women here.  And stay tuned to this podcast for the rest of the interviews with these brilliant women of mathematics over the coming weeks.
The music in this podcast comes from the band eusa. The track is called Plankton.
Women of Mathematics: Nilanjana Datta Last week we started a special series of podcasts revisiting the  Women of Mathematics photo exhibition, which celebrates female mathematicians from institutions throughout Europe. When the University of Cambridge hosted the exhibition in 2017, we had the opportunity to interview the six Cambridge mathematicians who's portraits appear in the exhibition about their work and their mathematical lives.
In this podcast we revisit our 2017 interview with Nilanjana Datta – now a professor in quantum information theory., who told us why she loves maths and also about some of the challenges she has faced as a female mathematician.

 
You can see all the Cambridge portraits and find out more about the work and mathematical lives of these women here. And stay tuned to this podcast for the rest of the interviews with these brilliant women of mathematics over the coming weeks.
The music in this podcast comes from the band eusa. The track is called Plankton.
Women of mathematics: Anne-Christine Davis In this podcast we revisit our 2017 interview with Anne-Christine Davis, Professor of Theoretical Physics. Anne was the first female professor in the Maths faculty at the University of Cambridge. In this interview, first recorded to celebrate the addition of six portraits of Cambridge mathematicians to the Women of Mathematics photo exhibition, Davis told us that over her long career she had seen attitudes towards women change for the better. But as you'll hear she had to put up with quite a lot at the start!
 

To find a transcript and video of this interview, meet the other female mathematicians, and find out more about the exhibition, see here. And you can read more about Davis' recent prize-winning research in our article On the road to dark energy (with chameleons).
Women of Mathematics: Julia Gog In this podcast we are very happy to revist our 2017 interview with Julia Gog – Professor of Mathematical Biology and a very good friend of us here at plus.maths.org. Over the last two years we've been working closely with Gog and her colleagues at the JUNIPER modelling consortium, communicating their work on the mathematical front-line of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 
In this interview, first recorded to celebrate the addition of six portraits of Cambridge mathematicians to the Women of Mathematics photo exhibition, Gog told us about the buzz of mathematical research, and how maths can help you do good in the world.
To find a transcript and video of this interview, meet the other female mathematicians, and find out more about the exhibition, see here. And you can read more about the work of Gog and her JUNIPER colleagues here.
Women of Mathematics: Holly Krieger In this podcast we are very happy to revisit our 2017 interview with Holly Krieger, one of the six Cambridge mathematicians whose portrait is included in the Women of Mathematics photo exhibition. Krieger works in dynamical systems theory, particularly on chaotic systems. In this interview she told us about the joys of learning and conversations with colleagues.
 

Holly Krieger (Photograph by Henry Kenyon)
 
You can find more about Krieger's prize winning work in Dynamic numbers and you see her talk about complex numbers and dynamical systems in our collection Complex numbers: Why do we love them?
To find a transcript and video of this interview, meet the other female mathematicians, and find out more about the exhibition, see here.
On our way to the writing workshops we were running with these wo” id=”KBDLX0CnVN” vid=”KBDLX0CnVN” id-for-player=”KBDLX0CnVN” link=”/listen/women-of-mathematics-carola-bibiane-schonlieb-KBDLX0CnVN/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Women of Mathematics: Carola-Bibiane Schönlieb Over the summer we were lucky enough to meet some young female mathematicians who were just finishing up their summer research projects with the Philippa Fawcett Internship Programme and the Cambridge Mathematics Placements programme.
On our way to the writing workshops we were running with these women, we walked past six inspiring portraits of female mathematicians from Cambridge. These form part of the Women of Mathematics photo exhibition, which celebrates female mathematicians from institutions throughout Europe. It's been a great pleasure revisiting our our 2017 Women of Mathematics interviews with these mathematicians about their work and their mathematical lives in this special series of podcasts.
 
Today's podcast is the final one of this series, and we are very pleased to revisit our interview with Carola-Bibiane Schönlieb, now professor of applied mathematics and a very good friend of us here at plus.maths.org. Carola works on the interface between machine learning and the mathematics of image analysis.
 
 

You can read more about some of Carola's recent work, including how artificial intelligence can support medical doctors in their work, and the INTEGRAL project, a collaboration with Indian researchers on how machine learning can make sense of the vast amounts of remote sensing data that is available to help conserve forests and improve life in cities.
To find a transcript and video of this interview, meet the other female mathematicians, and find out more about the exhibition, see here.
Voices from Ukraine: Nataliya Vaisfel’d Professor Nataliya Vaisfel'd was until recently a mathematician at Odesa I. I. Mechnykov National University. Forced to flee Ukraine after the Russian invasion of her home country in February of this year, Nataliya has since travelled across Europe with her wheelchair-bound mother and their dogs, eventually finding sanctuary in Britain. In part this was thanks to the Solidarity for mathematicians programme ran by the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences. She is now a Senior Lecturer at King’s College London. 
In this podcast Nataliya tells her story in conversation with the INI's Dan Aspel.
We are very pleased to host this episode of the Living Proof podcast as part of our collaboration with the wonderful INI.

This podcast was produced as part of our collaboration with the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI) – you can find all the content from our collaboration here. The INI is an international research centre and our neighbour here on the University of Cambridge's maths campus. It attracts leading mathematical scientists from all over the world, and is open to all. Visit www.newton.ac.uk to find out more.
Voices from Ukraine: Yuriy Semenov Yuriy Semenov was forced to leave Ukraine, and his work at the Institute of Hydromechanics at the National Academy of Sciences, due to the Russian invasion of February 2022. He found sanctuary in Britain at the University of East Anglia. In part this was thanks to the Solidarity for mathematicians programme ran by the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI).
In this podcast Yuriy speaks to the INI's Dan Aspel and shares his experience of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, and why the work of a mathematicians is always possible.
We are very pleased to host this episode of the Living Proof podcast as part of our collaboration with the wonderful INI.
For this week’s episode we delve back far into our archive to h” id=”9ROi3xPqPJj” vid=”9ROi3xPqPJj” id-for-player=”9ROi3xPqPJj” link=”/listen/stadium-maths-9ROi3xPqPJj/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Stadium maths Amid much controversy, the 2022 World Cup has begun and the action has now moved onto the football pitches inside the many newly built stadiums in Qatar. But how are these stadiums turned from architectural sketches into real buildings?
For this week's episode we delve back far into our archive to hear from Paul Shepherd from the University of Bath, an expert in building football stadiums such as the famous Emirates stadium in London. In this interview, first recorded back in 2007, he tells us about what kind of things are important in building a stadium, how maths is an integral part of the design process, and why his work required him to listen to Belgian techno.

The Emirates Stadium, home of the Arsenal football club. (Photo Arne Müseler – CC BY-SA 3.0 DE)
 
You can hear more about the maths behind famous sporting buildings in our recent podcast How the velodrome found its form. And you can find out much more about the maths behind football and sports, and behind engineering and architecture here on Plus.
Are the constants of nature really constant? There are some numbers you can rely on. The speed of light, c, is 299,792,458 ms-1. The gravitational constant, G, is 6.674 x 10-11m3kg-1s-2. These are examples of what are often called the constants of nature – fundamental physical quantities that seem to be the same everywhere, and unchanging over time.
Or are they? Today would have been our wonderful boss, John D. Barrow's, 70th birthday. And to celebrate him and his work we look at the answer to this question in today's podcast.
John D. Barrow (Image credit: Tom Powell)

Over time, since these constants were discovered, people had hoped to find a theory, a great theory of everything, that would explain why these particular values had arisen. However, as John explains in this podcast, developments in recent decades, in areas such as string theory, have shown that these constants could take any value. And this provided the motivation for studying whether such constants might be changing in value.
John, together with the astronomer John Webb, initiated an observational programme looking at the light produced by quasars in the distant Universe. They developed new techniques to analyse the light to test if certain constants had the same value near a quasar as they did in laboratories here on Earth.
You can find out more about this aspect of John’s work in this podcast, and read more in his accompanying article: Are the constants of nature really constant? And you can find out more about some of John's other work and interests in his many Plus articles.
This interview was recorded in 2009 as part of our celebration of the International Year of Astronomy 2009, where we tried to answer the questions everyone wanted to ask about the Universe
A 60% chance of rain: Weather, climate, and how to deal with uncertainty Will climate change leave the region you live in hotter and drier, or wetter and stormier? It's a question of utmost importance in many areas of the world, yet it's one that climate scientists can't answer. This is why world-leading climate scientist Tim Palmer is calling for a high-performance supercomputing centre dedicated entirely to climate change.
Tim Palmer.

We were lucky enough to meet Palmer at a recent event organised by the Newton Gateway to Mathematics In Cambridge. In this podcast we talk to Palmer about this call for a "CERN for climate change" and why climate forecasting requires so much computing power in the first place. Palmer also tells us about a technique for dealing with uncertainty called ensemble forecasting, and what his work has taught him about uncertainty more generally, as it crops up in many areas of life and nature.
Tim Palmer's new book on the science of uncertainty, The primacy of doubt, is published by Oxford University Press. To learn more about climate models see this article. To learn about weather forecasting see this article, and to read about uncertainty more general click here.
This podcast was produced as part of our collaboration with the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences (INI) – you can find all the content from our collaboration here. The INI is an international research centre and our neighbour here on the University of Cambridge's maths campus. It attracts leading mathematical scientists from all over the world, and is open to all. Visit www.newton.ac.uk to find out more.
What are liquid metal batteries The world needs to move to renewable energy sources, such as solar or wind. The problem with those is that they're intermittent. That's because the Sun doesn't always shine and the wind doesn't always blow. What we need, then, are efficient ways of storing energy: efficient batteries. Currently lithium ion batteries are being used but there are issues around their cost, how long they last, and their safety.
 

Donald Sadoway
Hope is on the horizon in the form of liquid metal batteries. At a recent event organised by the Newton Gateway to Mathematics in Cambridge we met Donald Sadoway who played a very important role in pioneering these batteries. In this podcast he talks to us what they are and why they are better, when they'll be commercially available, and why sometimes it's best to ignore the experts.
To watch a talk given by Sadoway at the Newton Gateway event go to the Newton Gateway website. And to find out more about magnetohydrodynamics, a theory that has been used to describe liquid metal batteries, go here.
Trigonometric graphs for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams.This episode covers the following:• Graphs of trigonometric functions• Transformations of trigonometric graphsResources:• Questions for this Topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Trigonometric-graphs• Exam Revision Plan Generator: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/plan• Online Tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring• Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
The Ten Most Important Theorems in Mathematics, Part I Jim Stein, Professor Emeritus of CSULB, presents his very subjective list of what he believes are the ten most important theorems, with several runners up. These theorems cover a broad range of mathematics–geometry, calculus, foundations, combinatorics and more. Each is accompanied by background on the problems they solve, the mathematicians who discovered them, and a couple personal stories. We cover all the runners up and numbers 10, 9 and 8. Next month we'll learn about numbers 1 through 7. 



Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-art-of-mathematics/message
Begin chapter on extensionality This episode begins a new chapter on extensionality in type theory, where we seek to equate terms in different ways based on their types.  The basic example is function extensionality, where we would like to equate functions from A to B if given equal inputs at type A, they produce equal outputs at type B.  With this definition, quicksort and mergesort are equal, even though their codes are not syntactically equivalent.  The episode begins by reviewing the distinction between definitional and propositional equality.Also, I am still seeking your small donations ($5 or $10 would be awesome) to pay my podcast-hosting fees at Buzzsprout.  To donate, click here, and then under "Gift details" select "Search for additional options" and then search for Computer Science.  Select the Computer Science Development Fund, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.  Then add gift instructions saying that this is to support the Iowa Type Theory Commute podcast of Aaron Stump.  Sorry it's that complicated.
Statistics for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience, Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. This episode covers:• Quartiles• Standard deviation• Line of best fitResources: • Questions for this topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Statistics • Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf • Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring • Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
76: Joule Pay for This! (Energy) Join Sofia Baca and her guests Millicent Oriana from Nerd Forensics and Arianna Lunarosa as they discuss energy.The sound that you're listening to, the device that you're listening on, and the cells in both the ear you're using to listen and the brain that understands these words have at least one thing in common: they represent the consumption or transference of energy. The same goes for your eyes if you're reading a transcript of this. The waves in the ears are pressure waves, while eyes receive information in the form of radiant energy, but they both are still called "energy". But what is energy? Energy is a scalar quantity measured in dimensions of force times distance, and the role that energy plays depends on the dynamics of the system. So what is the difference between potential and kinetic energy? How can understanding energy simplify problems? And how do we design a roller coaster in frictionless physics land?[Featuring: Sofia Baca; Millicent Oriana, Arianna Lunarosa]This episode is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Full text here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/
Episode 72 – Building With The Future in Mind This episode is with Ethan Fogle of HGA Architects and Engineers about some of his work and an itroduction for us regarding sustainability and embodied carbod as it relates to structural engineers. This is a theme that we've wanted to share for a long time so this episode goes a bit longer than usual but we think its valuable information to understand moving ahead in our careers and as an industry, enjoy!Some Helpful Links:SE 2050Arch 2030Dovetail PartnersForest Management Reach out to us:InstagramLinkedInEmail: [email protected]
Papers from Formal Methods for Blockchains 2021 In this episode, I talk about two papers from the 3rd International Workshop on Formal Methods for Blockchains, 2021.  Also, I am continuing my request for your small donations ($5 or $10 would be awesome) to pay my podcast-hosting fees at Buzzsprout.  To donate, click here, and then under "Gift details" select "Search for additional options" and then search for Computer Science.  Select the Computer Science Development Fund, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.  Then add gift instructions saying that this is to support the Iowa Type Theory Commute podcast of Aaron Stump.  Sorry it's that complicated.

Kevin Knudson: I’m Kevin Knudson, professor of mathematics at the University of” id=”96hPxTQ0KEs” vid=”96hPxTQ0KEs” id-for-player=”96hPxTQ0KEs” link=”/listen/episode-82-juliette-bruce-96hPxTQ0KEs/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Episode 82 – Juliette Bruce Evelyn Lamb: Hello and welcome to My Favorite Theorem, the math podcasts with no quiz at the end. I'm your host Evelyn Lamb. I'm a freelance math and science writer in Salt Lake City, Utah. And this is your other host.

Kevin Knudson: I’m Kevin Knudson, professor of mathematics at the University of Florida. How's it going?

EL: All right. I got to take an overnight Amtrak trip last weekend, my first time, so that was pretty fun. Went from Salt Lake to Sacramento and got to see lots of beautiful Nevada and California landscapes on the way.

KK: Yeah, I did an overnight Amtrak once and it was less fun. It was from Jackson, Mississippi to Chicago. And — which, I mean, it's, you know, it's all night, right? So you don't really see anything. And it's remarkable how many times have to pull over for the freight trains, right?

EL: Yeah.

KK: This is how American rail is really different from European rail. You're at the mercy of all the freight, but that's okay. Anyway, yeah.

EL: I guess, today, living on the only portion of Amtrak's corridor for which they actually own the tracks, is our guest, Juliette Bruce. At least I hope I'm correct, that that's where you're living. Otherwise, that was a weird introduction. So please tell us a little bit about yourself.

Juliette Bruce: Thank you so much for the introduction. I'm Juliette Bruce, as you said, and I am a postdoc at Brown University. So in fact, I am in the northeast along the Acela Express corridor. In fact, I've never taken that Amtrak corridor, I've only taken the very slow ones that you were talking about, but I hope to take it soon.

EL: Yes. Find yourself someplace to go between New York, DC, Boston, I guess to Boston, you don't really need the Acela. It's already pretty close.

KK: You can walk to Boston.

EL: If you're really dedicated.

JB: It’s a pretty far walk.

EL: Yes. So I guess this isn't the train cast. This is a math podcast. So, so yeah. What are your mathematical interests at Brown?

JB: Yeah, so my area of math is kind of in the intersection of algebraic geometry and commutative algebra, which is all about studying the interaction between this algebra, coming from kind of the symbolic equations we get when we write down systems of polynomial equations, and the kind of geometry we can look at when we study the zero set of those equations. So we can look at the simultaneous solutions to the system of polynomials, and that's some lovely geometric object. And alternatively, we can look at these symbols we write on our paper, and somehow, in some point in math, we learned that we can do lovely things, like finding the roots of a quadratic polynomial by graphing them on our graphing calculator pictorially, or we learn we can use symbols and write down things like the quadratic formula, and magically they give the same answer. A lot of my research is sometimes a generalization of this fact that there's two different ways to study the solutions to a system of polynomial equations.

EL: Right. I must admit, I'm pretty naive about algebraic geometry, but there is this kind of magic in it, which is — you know, like, in, what, seventh or eighth grade or something, you start learning to graph the zeros of polynomials. Maybe you might not use that exact language for it, but you start to understand that you can intersect two different polynomial equations and find these intersection points and stuff like that. And yet, this is also like cutting edge math, you know, just add a few variables, or bump up the powers of the the numbers that you're using. And suddenly, this is stuff that, you know, people are getting PhDs in. I's kind of kind of cool,

KK: Right? Or work over a finite field, whatever those are. Yeah.

JB: I mean, I always find it fascinating with just how many different areas algebraic geometry has touched in mathematics and in the world. It seems to start from such a lovely and beautiful, simple idea that we learn in, you know, middle school or high school, and just kind of grows exponentially. And it turns out, it's actually a very deep idea that maybe we don't always appreciate when we first see it. I know I certainly did not.

EL: Yeah.

KK: All right.

EL: So then what is your favorite theorem?

JB: So my favorite theorem, or the theorem I want to talk about today, I know it as Petri’s theorem. I know some people know it as the Babbage-Enriques-Noether-Petri theorem. I'm not sure exactly on the correct attribution here, so I'll stick with Petri’s thereom and apologize to Babbage, Noether, and Enriques, who maybe want the appropriate attribution here. And this is a the
Surprisingly Better than 50-50 Jim Stein, Professor Emeritus of California State University Long Beach, discusses some bets that appear to be 50-50, but can have better odds with a tiny amount of seemingly useless information. Blackwell's Bet involves two envelopes of money. You can open only one. Which one do you choose? We learn about David Blackwell and his mathematical journey amid blatant racism. Another seeming 50-50 bet is guessing which of two unrelated events that you know nothing about is more likely; you can do better than 50-50 by taking just one sample of one of the events. Dr. Stein then discusses how mathematics shows up in some surprising places. Mathematics studied for the pure joy of it often finds surprising uses. He gives some examples from G. H. Hardy as well as his own research.



Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-art-of-mathematics/message
Graphs for National 5 Maths National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. This episode covers:• Equation of a line• Quadratic graphsResources: • Questions for this topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Graphs • Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf • Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring • Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
AI for solving Rubik's Cube In this episode of Hi I Like Maths, we have Dr. Forest Agostinelli – assistant professor of computer science and engineering and faculty member of the Artificial Intelligence Institute at the University of South Carolina- to talk about: -His research projects at the University of South Carolina -AI for solving Rubik's Cube and his results -Different mathematical subjects which are useful for AI Pain point of being a researcher-struggle to switch off the brain -Researchers are at the risk of mental health -Playing music for funhttps://cse.sc.edu/~foresta/
Effective and Collaborative Problem Solving Host, Leanne McMahon catches up with highly experienced mathematics educator and founder of  Maths Teacher Circles in Australia, Michaela Epstein to discuss how Problem Solving in classrooms of all year levels can be effective and collaborative. We discuss how teachers can go about incorporating problem solving into their classroom practice and how to structure these activities. We also look at the false dichotomy between problem solving and explicit instruction and why each of these has its place in the contemporary Maths classroom.
Resources:
Michaela's website: https://www.michaelaepstein.com.au/ 
Other links discussed by Michaela:
Maths Teacher Circles website: https://mathsteachercircles.org/amsi 
We share problems on a regular basis that we believe you will love:Twitter: https://twitter.com/MathsCirclesOz
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathsTeacherCircles/



Some good sources of Problems:
NZ Maths https://nzmaths.co.nz/problem-solving (Some great articles to read here too)
NRich from the University of Cambridge. https://nrich.maths.org/ (Also terrific articles)
Not free, but worth checking out is Problemo https://problemo.edu.au/
Re Solve – Maths by inquiry https://resolve.edu.au/
AMSI Calculate has some lessons written up for you https://calculate.org.au/

Contact us on [email protected] or Twittter @AMSIschools or Facebook MathsTalk by AMSI Schools
Episode 71 – Dampers, How to Shake it up and Slow it Down This episode we're talking with Trevor Haskett of motioneering, motioneering is one of the worlds premier firms managing damping systems. If you've ever seen the picture of the large golden ball pendulum type structure in Taipei 101, motioneering would be the team behind it. Enjoy our conversation while we learn a little more about the practical terms of a damper, weight and volume requirements, and the many systems available to the designer. InstagramLinkedInEmail: [email protected]
To Infinity and Beyond Definition of a limit and some cool applications of limits!
National 5 Maths Percentages National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. This episode covers:• Interest• Reverse percentagesResources: • Questions for this topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Percentages • Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf • Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring • Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Mi-Cho-Coq: Michelson formalized and applied, in Coq In this episode, I discuss this paper, "Mi-Cho-Coq, a Framework for CertifyingTezos Smart Contracts", by Bernardo et al.  The paper gives a nice and very clear introduction to the Michelson language, and a formalization of it in Coq.  This is used to prove a correctness property about a Multisig contract.I also kindly solicit your small donations ($5 or $10 would be awesome) to pay my podcast-hosting fees at Buzzsprout.  To donate, click here, and then under "Gift details" select "Search for additional options" and then search for Computer Science.  Select the Computer Science Development Fund, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.  Then add gift instructions saying that this is to support the Iowa Type Theory Commute podcast of Aaron Stump.  Sorry it's that complicated.
THE FACTORIAL NOTATION Another one where we learn to find the number of ways to doing a certain thing. This notation helps in making calculation easier. Let's see how it goes a long way in making the calculation shorter.
Most In-demand Artificial Intelligence (AI) to learn In this episode of Hi I Like Maths, we have Dr. Forest Agostinelli – assistant professor of computer science and engineering and faculty member of the Artificial Intelligence Institute at the University of South Carolina- to talk about: -University majors which lead to a career in AI -Why AI and what the future of AI will look like? -AI for solving real-life problems -Required skills to work in AI fields -What’s creativity and why it’s needed -Can computers become creative? -C++, Python, R or Matlab? Which one is needed? -Is Excel still useful?
Cindy Wyels Today we feature a thoughtful conversation with Cindy Wyels, Professor of Mathematics at California State Channel Islands and Secretary of the Mathematical Association of America. Cindy grew up in southern California with a small interlude in Australia, she attended Pomona College where she was a student-athlete majoring in math and she earned her PhD at the University of California Santa Barbara. She cares deeply about providing access to a quality education and has co-authored two 5-year, $6m Hispanic-Serving Institution STEM grants to provide academic support for undergraduates studying STEM and pedagogical renewal for faculty. This conversation highlights the importance of saying “yes” to what is most meaningful, of amplifying the voices of students and colleagues, of building intentional networks, and of making exercise, especially in the ocean, a part of every day.

Evelyn Lamb: Co-host. It’s a host but going in the opposite ” id=”7EH1hAaNNwv” vid=”7EH1hAaNNwv” id-for-player=”7EH1hAaNNwv” link=”/listen/episode-81-christopher-danielson-7EH1hAaNNwv/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Episode 81 – Christopher Danielson Kevin Knudson: Welcome to My Favorite Theorem, the math podcast with no quiz at the end. I'm Kevin Knudson, professor of mathematics at the University of Florida and I am joined as always by my fabulous other host, co-host? I don't know,

Evelyn Lamb: Co-host. It’s a host but going in the opposite direction.


KK: That’s right. We reverse the arrows. Haha, math joke.


EL: Yes, I'm Evelyn Lamb, a freelance math and science writer in Salt Lake City, Utah. Actually just got back to Salt Lake from a wonderful trip this past week where I got to meet two new additions to my family, ages three months and three weeks. So that was, that was pretty fun, to hold one of the tiniest babies I've ever held. So yeah, very nice little fall trip to take. And now I'm back here and talking about math.


KK: Yeah, well, last Friday night, I drove two hours over to Ponte Vedra, which is sort of near Jacksonville, by myself to a concert. So this is where I am in life. So I went to see Bob Mould, who many people may or may not know, but he was — Yeah, Christopher's shaking his head yeah. He was at Hüsker Dü and then Sugar. He's been doing solo albums forever. And I've been a fan for going on 40 years, which is also weird to say. Had a great time, though. By myself, that's great. This is what one does in his 50s I suppose. Anyway, not as exciting as holding a newborn but, but still pretty good. So anyway, hey, let's talk math. So today, we are pleased to welcome Christopher Danielson to the show. Why don’t you tell us about yourself.


Christopher Danielson: Yeah, I am coming to you from St. Paul, Minnesota.


KK: Nice.


CD: Bob Mould, also a fellow Minnesotan. [Ed. note: Bob Mould is actually from upstate New York.]


KK: He went to McAllister, right. Yeah.


CD: Nice. Right up the street from where I'm standing right now. I work a day job at Desmos Classroom, which is now part of Amplify, designing — working with a number of colleagues to design math curricula. We are currently working on an Algebra I curriculum, about to wrap that up, and moving on to Geometry. And then on the side, I have many projects, some of which will come up in our work today. But I think I understand that you two are familiar with the Talking Math With Your Kids blog that grew into then a large-scale playful annual family math event at the Minnesota State Fair called Math on a Stick.


KK: Cool.


CD: And I also am Executive Director at a small nonprofit that seeks to create playful, informal math experiences for children and families in the same spirit as the work we do at Math on a Stick, but designed for a variety of other sorts of spaces. That nonprofit is called Public Math.


KK: Very cool.


EL: So I'm probably doing that thing where I generalize from a small number of examples. One of my best friends in grad school was from Minnesota, and just loved the State Fair. So I think that Minnesotans just have it this special relationship with the State Fair. And so I did — I am really interested in hearing more about how you do Math on a Stick at the Minnesota State Fair.


CD: Yeah. Should I pick that up right now? Or is there more on the agenda?


EL: Yeah, that would be great!


KK: No, go ahead.


CD: Yeah, so the Minnesota State Fair, it's the second largest state fair in the country behind only of course, Texas.


EL: Where I am from.


CD: Oh, nice. Texas lasts for a month. Ours is 12 days. 12 days of fun ending Labor Day is one of the mottos. The other is the great Minnesota get-together. The location of the fairgrounds is especially convenient for large attendance. The fairgrounds are right, sort of on the border between Minneapolis and St. Paul. And they have been, for probably the past 20 years, have been working on developing some educational and family friendly spaces, out of a perception that it is expensive to go to the fair, which is true, but then once you're in that there isn't much to do besides look at animals and buy a bunch of food.


EL: On a stick.


CD: Yeah, on a stick. So they’ve been working on that. And that led to a lovely literacy space called the alphabet forest that is about 12 years old now. And the first time I sat down there, it was their fifth year and was like the sky, the clouds parted and the angels sang, and I was like, I’ve got to figure out how to build a math version of this. And so together with some organizational support from the Minnesota Council of Teachers of Mathematics and a bunch of expertise from folks that I know through the blog work and through my work in math education, put together a pitch, and after many ver
Fascinating Fractals Jeanne Lazzarini joins us again to discuss fractals, a way to investigate the roughness that we see in nature, as opposed to the smoothness of standard mathematics. Fractals are built of iterated patterns with zoom similarity. Examples include the Koch Snowflake, which encloses a finite area but has infinite perimeter, and the Sierpinski Triangle, which has no area at all. Fractals have fractional dimension. For example, The Sierpinski Triangle is of dimension 1.585, reflecting its position in the nether world between 1 dimension and 2. Fractals are used in art, medicine, science and technology.



Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-art-of-mathematics/message
Start of Season 4: Formal Methods for Blockchain I start off a new chapter (seventeen!) of the podcast, to talk about formal methods for blockchain systems.  In the next few episodes, we will look at some verification efforts related to the Tezos blockchain.
Mary Gray Today we feature an exciting conversation with Dr. Mary Gray, Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Statistics at American University in Washington DC. Dr. Gray earned her PHD in mathematics from the University of Kansas and her JD from the Washington College of Law at American University. As a statistician and lawyer, Dr. Gray’s areas of research focus on applications of statistics to human rights, economic equity and education. She is the founder of the Association for Women in Mathematics, a fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a recipient of the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Engineering and Mathematics Mentoring. She has authored two books and over eighty articles. In this conversation, you will learn about the power of an effective undergraduate advisor, about recognizing and caring for critical issues long before they gain national attention, about working with others to effect change, and about how a gift of gratitude from a student led to an extensive collection of owls.
National 5 Maths Direct proportion National 5 Maths Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. This episode covers:• Scale factorsResources: • Questions for this topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Maths/SQA/National-5/Direct-proportion • Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf • Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring • Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
to planning – which carefully sequences learning of key knowledge and skills across subjects and year levels. In this episode, Leanne McMahon (AMSI) and Nadia Abdelal from EM Maths discus” id=”9XbRMEbBVy7″ vid=”9XbRMEbBVy7″ id-for-player=”9XbRMEbBVy7″ link=”/listen/how-to-improve-curriculum-planning-in-schools-ending-the-lesson-lottery-a-discussion-9XbRMEbBVy7/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
How to improve curriculum planning in schools: Ending the lesson lottery – A Discussion The Grattan Institute recently released a report looking at the benefits of a coordinated, whole-school approach
to planning – which carefully sequences learning of key knowledge and skills across subjects and year levels. In this episode, Leanne McMahon (AMSI) and Nadia Abdelal from EM Maths discuss the significance of this report and how the recommendations would play out in schools. Naturally we focus on Mathematics, but this is a discussion that belongs across all learning areas.
The report can be found here: https://grattan.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/Ending-the-lesson-lottery-Grattan-Report.pdf
Nadia can be contacted here: https://www.emmaths.com.au/ 
Leanne can be contacted here: [email protected]
Find resources and ICE-EM Books at https://calculate.org.au/
FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLE OF COUNTING – 2 Let's try to understand the Fundamental Principle of Counting using some simple examples. This will help us understand the working rules in a better way
Episode 70 – School-Masters-Your First Job This week we talk with David Wu, a new engineer recently completing his undergrad, and now finishing up a great internship before grad school. We talk with David about what new engineers can expect from the working world, and we ask about how his education prepared him for his first structural internship and why he chose a masters. If your either getting started in the working world yourself, or bringing on your first junior engineer, this will be a great episode for you.If you have any questions, feel free to send us an email, and otherwise it's great to be back. InstagramLinkedInEmail: [email protected]
Ron Buckmire Today we feature a broad, thoughtful conversation with Dr. Ron Buckmire, Professor of Mathematics and Associate Dean for Curricular Affairs at Occidental College in Los Angeles, Califronia. Ron was born in Grenada, grew up in the States, and earned his undergraduate, masters and PhD degrees from Renssalear Polytehnic Institute in Troy, New York. He studied applied mathematics and recently published Improving Applied Mathematics Education with Jessica Libertini in 2021. He has served as a Program Director in the NSF’s Division of Undergraduate Education in the Washington, DC area . In this conversation Ron talks about “leaving the campground cleaner than you found it,” the role of immigration in a professional life, the importance of funding, and expanding people through education and understanding.
The Window of Adaptation Quick episode that covers a little human physiology, math, and encouragement! Never give up my friends ?
Verification of Tezos smart contracts with K-Michelson In this episode (proudly wearing my "I am not an expert" hat), I discuss efforts by Runtime Verification to verify the Dexter2 defi smart contract, using their K-Michelson tool, which provides an executable description of the operational semantics of the Michelson language used for smart contracts on the Tezos blockchain.
We’re back! After a long hiatus, I’m back! Sorry about the audio quality!!
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