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Physics

All Audio
Updated On: Nov 04, 2023
Total Stations: 190
Total Audio Titles: 2,712

Popular “Physics” Stations

Physical Preparation Podcast – Robertson Training Systems The Physical Preparation Podcast is designed to help trainers, coaches and athletes take their performance to the next level. Featuring some of the brightest minds in our industry, we'll dive in to deconstruct smart training, and help you or your athletes maximize results!

Popular “Physics” Playlists

Best of STEAM Powered Voices Michele Ong, host of STEAM Powered, is proud to present the Best of STEAM Powered Voices, with fascinating and insightful content from our guests and other brilliant speakers in the extended Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics, and Medical community. STEAM Powered
Deep Dive: Ocean Conservation Learn how we can better protect our seas and marine life with interviews from scientists and other enthusiasts talking all about ocean conservation. Discover the specific challenges that face our oceans and hear about actionable solutions everyone can contribute to. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Deep Dive: Black Holes Enjoy these far-out podcasts talking all about one of the most mysterious areas of astronomy, black holes. Listen to astronomers and other experts talk about the nature of black holes and what we still don't know about them. Learn about this fascinating natural phenomenon with this collection of astronomy podcasts. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Best Science Audio On Vurbl Listen to the weirdest episodes of top science podcasts! Featuring leading experts in biology, psychology, medicine, epidemiology astronomy, computer science, and many disciplines as they share the latest & wildest scientific discoveries and developments. Includes episodes from Weather Geeks, Hidden Brain, Our Epic Ocean, STEAM Powered, and more! Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
The Human Body Listen to some of the best podcasts about anatomy and physiology here! Explore podcasts about how the human brain functions, the sensory organs, diseases, and much more. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Highlights: Agroecology and Climate Change with Dr Anika Molesworth Highlights from STEAM Powered's conversation with Dr Anika Molesworth, Farmer, Scientist, Storyteller, and related topics. STEAM Powered
Highlights: Stem Cell Biology with Rebecca Lim (#1) Highlights from STEAM Powered's conversation with Rebecca Lim, Stem Cell Biologist, and related topics. STEAM Powered
It’s an extremely complex topic with a lot to consider. This playlist tries to voice the multiple sides as fairly as possible.” id=”deep-sea-mining-a-look-at-both-sides-of-the-issue” vid=”deep-sea-mining-a-look-at-both-sides-of-the-issue” id-for-player=”deep-sea-mining-a-look-at-both-sides-of-the-issue” link=”/playlists/deep-sea-mining-a-look-at-both-sides-of-the-issue/” is-authorized=”false” csrf=”0jPbUx9wqFhG1zFH0Fi5OLtaLkkSYVzbHbWeXSR34rQOCUIffXG1S99dQrfOKqSI” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Deep-Sea Mining: A Look At Both Sides of the Issue Deep-sea mining, the removal of valuable minerals from the seabed, is rapidly becoming a reality.
It's an extremely complex topic with a lot to consider. This playlist tries to voice the multiple sides as fairly as possible.
The Deep-Sea Podcast
Unforgettable Moments in Space Exploration From the dawn of time, man has looked towards the stars. Today, exploring them is a reality. From the first Soviet satellite launch, to the first steps on the moon, the challenger explosion and beyond, listen to this curated playlist of unforgettable and fascinating moments throughout the history of space exploration to remind you of the journey thus far, and excite you for where mankind will travel next. Vurbl Scientific Stories, News and Lessons
Geography Trivia Geography trivia questions from Barstool Sports' trivia show The Dozen. Watch full episodes at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5noofjAe8o&list=PLq62m2d0BaroV1pT8uo09_MVEc9XjWVlk Best of Barstool Sports

All “Physics” Audio

Cosmic Monsters with Dr Jessica (331) What are the biggest black holes called? Supermassive. Dr Jessica Bloom talks about these cosmic monsters and the amazing technology used to photograph them.
This lively edition of the Turing podcast covers a great variety of subjects, including some of Tom’s ” id=”79l7x0rW8sn” vid=”79l7x0rW8sn” id-for-player=”79l7x0rW8sn” link=”/listen/how-to-speak-whale-79l7x0rW8sn/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
How to Speak Whale Following Tom Mustill’s popular Turing Lecture at the Royal Institution, How to Speak Whale, Tom joins Bea and Jo to catch up on the latest advancements in communication between humans and animals.
This lively edition of the Turing podcast covers a great variety of subjects, including some of Tom’s favourite (and surprising) whale facts, and whether attempting to chat with aliens should be prioritised over speaking with animals.
A biologist and filmmaker, Tom has recently also turned writer. His debut book, How To Speak Whale: A Voyage into the Future of Animal Communication, was selected as one of Amazon's Best Books of The Year.
Do EEs really retire from electronics? Or just switch to hobby mode?
Eevblog2 video about going to a ham radio meetup with Dick Smith
Dick sold the shop in 82
Dave at the Fully Charged Show, he briefly met with Robert Llewllyn
The Sears XCargo
The Aptera is a funky lo” id=”7c2l56eeCTo” vid=”7c2l56eeCTo” id-for-player=”7c2l56eeCTo” link=”/listen/627-works-on-my-machine-7c2l56eeCTo/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#627 – Works on my machine Gordon Moore died two weeks ago
Do EEs really retire from electronics? Or just switch to hobby mode?
Eevblog2 video about going to a ham radio meetup with Dick Smith
Dick sold the shop in 82
Dave at the Fully Charged Show, he briefly met with Robert Llewllyn
The Sears XCargo
The Aptera is a funky looking, long range EV
Prusa Mk4 was released, Chris liked Thomas Sanladerer’s video about it
Dave is building a new desk out of pallets
Shawn Hymel’s video about GitHub actions
Gitpod / GitHub Codespaces
Thunderscope looks awesome! It started as a Hackaday Prize entry and is open source on GitHub
A short series about the Turing’s AI for Science and Government fund, that gives you the chance to hear about the people behind the project. Each episode you’ll be listening to a different colleague, their background, career and most importantly… how they li” id=”CjzubY9GlB” vid=”CjzubY9GlB” id-for-player=”CjzubY9GlB” link=”/listen/the-coffee-pod-ruoyun-hui-CjzubY9GlB/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
The Coffee Pod – Ruoyun Hui Welcome to the first Coffee Pod episode!
A short series about the Turing's AI for Science and Government fund, that gives you the chance to hear about the people behind the project. Each episode you’ll be listening to a different colleague, their background, career and most importantly… how they like their coffee. 
Joining podcast host Bea this week is Ruoyun Hui, a postdoctoral research associate at The Alan Turing Institute. 
This series is hosted by Bea Costa Gomes and produced by Luca Lane. The music has been produced by Spiders Eat Vinyl.
Life at the South Pole Science Station In this episode of This is Physics, Physics Magazine speaks with two researchers and a chef who have spent the entire polar night at the Amundsen–Scott South Pole Station. The two researchers work with telescopes observing the cosmic microwave background.Podcast host Julie Gould speaks with the following guests: Thomas Leps, BICEP/NSF/University of Minnesota; Allen Foster, SPT/NSF/Case Western Reserve University; Kelly Murphy, breakfast/pastry sous chef, NSF.Music credit: Symphony Antarctica (excerpts from The Seasons: I. Summer and IV. Spring; Telescopes to the Stars: III. Cosmic Strings and IV. Quiet Nights), by Valmar Kurol and Michael Stibor. The symphony is the duo’s fourth album inspired by Antarctica. Image credit: Artsiom P/stock.adobe.comProduced by Julie Gould.
The Higgs Boson, Ten Years After Researchers with the two collaborations that discovered the Higgs boson—ATLAS and CMS—relive the 2012 announcement of the discovery. They also talk about what it’s like to work on Higgs experiments and what they would still like to learn about the mass-giving particle.Podcast host Julie Gould speaks with the following guests: Joseph Incandela (University of California Santa Barbara/CERN), Jon Butterworth (University College London/CERN), Flavia de Almeida Dias (University of Amsterdam/CERN), Sahal Yacoob (University of Cape Town/CERN), and Victoria Martin (University of Edinburgh/CERN).This podcast is part of a series of pieces that Physics Magazine is publishing to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Higgs boson discovery. See also: News Feature: The Era of Higgs Physics; Poem: Higgs Boson—The Visible Glyph; Research News: A Particle is Born—Making the Higgs Famous; Q&A: The Higgs Boson—A Theory, An Observation, A Tool; and Collection: The History of Observations of the Higgs Boson.Music credit: Jarabi (Passion), performed by Derek Gripper, composed by Toumani Diabaté. Image credit: stock.adobe.com/master_andrii.Produced by Julie Gould.
Dr Maria Charisi, Postdoctoral associate at Vanderbilt University Today I am joined by Dr Maria Charisi, a postdoctoral associate at Vanderbilt university. Her expertise is in looking for Supermassive Black-Hole Binaries: which are systems that are formed during the collisions of galaxies and weigh well over hundreds of millions of times our Sun. Dr Charisi also talked about her experience in academia and how she would describe it to someone potentially looking for a career in research.
Quantum melodies: the intersection of music and quantum physics When pioneering musicians such as Kraftwerk and Brian Eno began experimenting with synthesizers and digital samplers in the 1970s, it was considered avant-garde and confined to niche audiences. It didn’t take long, however, for electronic music to explode in popularity, and today computer-produced music is ubiquitous among many genres and styles. This episode of the Physics World Stories podcast looks at a new trend in its nascent stages – music generated by quantum computers.
The first guest is science writer Philip Ball, who recently attended an improvised musical performance at the Goethe-Institut in London, an experience he described in this Physics World feature. Ball explains why the interface of quantum mechanics and music is interesting from both a scientific an artistic point of view.
Later in the episode, podcast host Andrew Glester is joined by Maria Mannone, a theoretical physicist working on quantum information at the University of Palermo in Italy, who is also a composer. Mannone discusses some of her experiments that incorporate scientific concepts into sound, and you can hear some of the music that emerges.
For much more quantum-inspired content, make sure to visit this website again on 14 April for World Quantum Day. During that week, the Physics World Weekly podcast will have a quantum theme and we will share a selection of quantum-related feature articles, interviews and analysis pieces. There will also be a chance to access quantum content and discounted quantum ebooks, shared by IOP Publishing – which publishes Physics World.


This episode is sponsored by Pfeiffer Vacuum. The company provides all types of vacuum equipment, including hybrid and magnetically-levitated turbopumps, leak detectors and analysis equipment, as well as vacuum chambers and systems. You can find about Pfeiffer Vacuum’s impact in space research in this video, and explore all its products on the Pfeiffer Vacuum website.


Episode 24: Episode 24: Danny Jaques Danny Jaques is a retired school teacher from Colorado. In his three decades of teaching, Danny helped with fundraising and chaperoned more than 500 students to Space Camp. He is a member of the Space Camp Hall of Fame, and owns Danny's Rocket Ranch, selling dehydrated space salsa and donating a portion of the profits to continue funding Space Camp Scholarships.

Just prior to recording, Chris saw that Dave had been talking about a different “AI autorouter”
Configuration on Quilter is currently pretty simple (not a lot
Sergiy worked at SpaceX in 2014 doing a bunch of boards for testing
“PCBs were th” id=”4bBtXfn5qUI” vid=”4bBtXfn5qUI” id-for-player=”4bBtXfn5qUI” link=”/listen/626-intelligent-routing-with-sergiy-nesterenko-4bBtXfn5qUI/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#626 – Intelligent Routing with Sergiy Nesterenko Welcome Sergiy Nesterenko of Quilter.ai!

Just prior to recording, Chris saw that Dave had been talking about a different “AI autorouter”
Configuration on Quilter is currently pretty simple (not a lot
Sergiy worked at SpaceX in 2014 doing a bunch of boards for testing
“PCBs were the tail end of the design, so it became the critical path”
Check out some of the public designs on the Quliter Blog
Quilter has remade the schematic of the OpenMV camera. This reworked board is indicative of the kinds of boards they can handle.
Generally sub-300 MHz, Sub 2A
Quilter has a full time EE on staff who helps try out different designs and give feedback.
They can parellelize designs by sending them off to a cluster for processing.
Chris noted that it felt similar to Place and Route on an FPGA.
Quilter doesn’t currently enforce “octolinear traces”, so the traces aren’t straight lines.
It makes it possible to detect generative designs, like on the “QPlayer” example
The toold helps by defining manufacturing constraints for you, specifically around available board houses.
Cost of compute
How do you balance the problem of knowledge? Chris and Dave discussed this for newer engineers in episode 625
“What is the job of a PCB?” (perfectly replicate a schematic)
Quilter is doing additional checks, including solving for Maxwell’s equations and Thermodynamics
There are decisions to make within the routing algorithm, ie. Should they enforce “star ground”?
When starting out, there was skepticism around code compilers! But over time people came to trust them more and more.
How can you try out Quilter? Sign up for waitlist! The best candidat designs will be:

Sub 2000 pins
sub 100 parts
sub 100Mhz
sub 2A
Open source designs


All the boards on the site have no human input
When trying out the service, many customers don’t trust the first board (but later they start to)
Spits boards back out as the same file format, they currently support KiCad, Altium, Eagle
NASA story designing S band antenna
When starting with new boards, the tool will import outlines by parsing layers in KiCad / Altium / Eagle.
Reconsidering different elemetns of a design (constraints)
Relaxing constraints (physics)
Software models
Why don’t some of these tools exist in layout software? Specifically simulation and physics engines.
Many do! (Ansys, TDK, etc). Often the cost isn’t justified for simpler boards, so people go without.
Feeding back real world squishiness into the model
Costs – Not yet set, but there will be different tiers for hobbyists and open source designs. Sergiy mentioned $50/month for non-enterprise, but it seems like it’s much too early to tell.
Check out more on the site at quilter.ai
Chatting with a Bot & Professor Toby Walsh (330) ChatGPT launched for free in 2022. Like Google it devoured vast data but regurgitated it in human-like responses. Is it truly a marvel? Dr Karl and Prof Toby Walsh put ChatGPT to the test.
47 – Boltzmann Brains: Could Reality Be An Illusion? (Rebroadcast) A whirlwind of questions brings us to an odd conclusion: could reality be an illusion created by a quantum fluctuation of a brain? This is a rebroadcast of a past favorite.For ad-free episodes and other exclusives, join us for $3 a month on Patreon: https://patreon.com/whythisuniverseSupport the show
SVB
There was a post for a “Prompt Engineer” paying $335K in SF
Who fixes things created with AI when they break? What if no one knows how it all works?
Coaching around learning electronics
Louis Rossman talking about rungs of the economi” id=”AjBbE1XVNTp” vid=”AjBbE1XVNTp” id-for-player=”AjBbE1XVNTp” link=”/listen/625-gremlins-in-the-machine-AjBbE1XVNTp/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#625 – Gremlins in the machine Dave had alarms going off just prior to recording
SVB
There was a post for a “Prompt Engineer” paying $335K in SF
Who fixes things created with AI when they break? What if no one knows how it all works?
Coaching around learning electronics
Louis Rossman talking about rungs of the economic ladder missing
Super Troopers
ARM is considering changing how they charge for their IP (linking to Ray Ozzie’s LinkedIn post because it was how Chris learned about the article and because clicking through from LinkedIn actually lets you read the article, whereas direct linking doesn’t…for some reason)

Gordon Moore passed away between when we recorded and posted, otherwise we would have obviously mentioned it. We will discuss his life and legacy on the next show with the two of us.
Bioplastics with Dr Yi Shen (329) Future archaeology may see our time now as an "Age of Plastic". Already sedimentary rings are forming. Dr Karl discusses solutions with Bioplastics and Dr Yi Shen.  drkarl.com
#624 – Design & Manufacturing Consulting with Scott Williams from Xentronics Scott Williams from Xentronics in Melbourne joins Dave to discuss setting up and running a design and manufacturing consulting business.
62 – JWST and the Earliest Galaxies in the Universe (ft. Mike Boylan-Kolchin) Astronomers' newest telescope, JWST, just discovered galaxies that formed earlier than previously thought possible. What does this discovery mean for our understanding of the early universe?To support our show and get ad-free episodes and other exclusives, join us for $3 a month on Patreon: https://patreon.com/whythisuniverseSupport the show
Universe Now with Professor Geraint Lewis (328) The James Webb Space Telescope has expanded our Universal view. Where is it changing? Dr Karl gets an update from Professor Geraint. drkarl.com geraintflewis.com
Parrot Thinking with Professor Irene Pepperberg (327) Bird Brains are different. Professor Irene Pepperberg has been probing their psychology for decades. She is the author of the NY Times bestseller 'Alex and Me', the story of her 30-year experiment with a grey parrot.  Alex the parrot
Artisanal crystal
“Too good for the job”
Story about boost converters
Dave video current consumption
NGA100
Dick Smith chat
Beagle Play and Beagle Connect were recently released
Linus Tech Tips studio
mHUB moving
Fran newspaper story (still think it&#82″ id=”5GtM3e6bYhu” vid=”5GtM3e6bYhu” id-for-player=”5GtM3e6bYhu” link=”/listen/623-artisanal-crystals-5GtM3e6bYhu/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#623 – Artisanal Crystals Statistically less safe prototypes
Artisanal crystal
“Too good for the job”
Story about boost converters
Dave video current consumption
NGA100
Dick Smith chat
Beagle Play and Beagle Connect were recently released
Linus Tech Tips studio
mHUB moving
Fran newspaper story (still think it’s on Fran’s patreon page only)
Live/work spaces
Shipstation
Shipping with Southwest (or other airlines)
Wendover video about the logistics of cargo carriers during COVID
New RPi global shutter camera
The death of Europe’s last electronics giant (Philips)

Yes, today’s intro was done by a robot, Chris is stuck in an airport again on the way to Embedded World
New Beginning I have had a new idea. It's going to be great. 🙂
AI in the financial sector With Dr Adrian Weller (Programme Director and Turing Fellow) and Kate Platonova (Group Chief Data Analytics Officer at HSBC), Ed Chalstrey discusses how AI is being used in financial services and what data is useful in banking today.
Richard Dawkins and Lawrence Krauss Onstage at the Orpheum Theater, Nov 15, 2022 On Nov 15th and 16th, 2022, The Origins Project Foundation hosted their first public events in North America at the beautiful Orpheum Theater in Phoenix, AZ (we had hosted an event in Iceland in September during our Greenland-Iceland Travel Adventure). There was no better way to begin this new series than with a dialogue onstage with Richard Dawkins, and that was the substance of our first night’s event. As all those who have followed us will know, Richard and I have done many dialogues together, onstage and online, and so it was important that this dialogue be new and different. Richard had just published a new book entitled “Books do Furnish a Life”, which is a compilation of essays he had written about other scientists and writers, and also transcripts of dialogues he had had with numerous people, including me. I decided this new book would provide a wonderful opportunity to jump off in new directions, and it turned out to be just that. The response from the audience and from those who had seen many of our previous dialogues was very positive, and we came off stage feeling like it was one of the best public conversations we have had. I hope those of you who watch it, or listen to it, here will agree. Following our 90 minute dialogue onstage we asked for questions from the audience, and after an intermission, we answered many of these. This Q&A will be offered as an exclusive post for Critical Mass paid subscribers, to thank you for your support of our efforts. It will remain behind the Critical Mass paywall for 1 month, and then will be released to the general public. I hope all of you enjoy this conversation, and Richard’s remarkable enthusiasm about science and writing, and his insights about the world. In a future post, we will release the video record of the second night’s conversation, a panel discussion with leading physicists about the current state of cosmology. Finally, later this month we will open our newest travel adventure, a trip to Ecuador and the Galapagos Island, for booking for the general public. Critical Mass subscribers will have an advance opportunity to book one of the 36 berths on this voyage. Stay tuned.As always, an ad-free video version of this podcast is also available to paid Critical Mass subscribers. Your subscriptions support the non-profit Origins Project Foundation, which produces the podcast. The audio version is available free on the Critical Mass site and on all podcast sites, and the video version will also be available on the Origins Project Youtube channel as well. Get full access to Critical Mass at lawrencekrauss.substack.com/subscribe
Mike was on TAH episode 403 at DEFCON 26 talking about Badgelife
Backlit LEDs
Mike was the Editor in Chief at Hackaday for 9 years, he” id=”6XH9PeHMluu” vid=”6XH9PeHMluu” id-for-player=”6XH9PeHMluu” link=”/listen/622-building-firmware-and-hardware-for-trade-shows-with-mike-szczys-6XH9PeHMluu/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#622 – Building Firmware and Hardware for Trade Shows with Mike Szczys Mike and Chris work together at Golioth, Mike agreed to join Chris this week after Chris forgot to schedule a guest because of working on demos for Embedded World 23
Mike was on TAH episode 403 at DEFCON 26 talking about Badgelife
Backlit LEDs
Mike was the Editor in Chief at Hackaday for 9 years, he was there a total of 13 years
Remoticon happened twice during the pandemic
Supercon returned in November 2022
The Zephyr Project
Mike loves manifest files (or has come to love them)
Marti Bolivar – Macrobatics
Zephyr Devicetree
FreeRTOS – Brian Amos
Zephyr The Linux Foundation
Nordic chose Zephyr as their go-to RTOS / Ecosystem (they build the Nordic Connect SDK on top of Zephyr)
Beginner content in Zephyr (check the sample and test folder in Zephyr)
Benjamin (new Zephyr DevRel) is interested in getting the Wio Terminal supported
Sensor subsystem in Zephyr
Kconfig
Zephyr shells
ESP-IDF
Mike was recently on Robert Ferenec’s YouTube channel building an IoT solution live
Command line vs IDE
VScode plugins help bridge the gapo
The Adafruit MagTag
EPaper displays often are lacking docs
Pimoroni badger
Mike created an i2c listener which uses PIO for i2c. It passes received commands up to the Micropython layer.
Marshalling 
Micropython allows you to use things like Hershey font files
Jared Wolff was on the show talking about the nRF9160 feather (and Zephyr)
Find Mike on Mastodon at @[email protected]
Mike’s personal site is jumptuck.com
The Double-Slit Experiment Ever heard of how confusing Quantum Mechanics is? In this episode we will start a series where we unravel the complex and confusing topics of this odd branch of physics. Tune in to learn about one of the founding experiments of Quantum Physics, the double-slit experiment.
Sino Moon Missions with Bradley Perrett (326) China has a Lunar landing program. It is as ambitious as NASA was in 1969. Dr Karl probes Space journalist Bradley Perrett on how soon we might see Chinese craft on the moon. drkarl.com
Teacher to Teachers: Tannis Niziol shares books, practices and thoughts on reading across the curriculum In this episode, we visit with a career English Language Arts teacher, Curriculum Consultant and Professional Learning Facilitator, Tannis Niziol. Throughout Tannis' 30-year career as an educator in Edmonton and Winnipeg, Tannis has remained passionate about teaching and learning and the need for explicit literacy apprenticeship at all grade levels in all subject areas.Tannis is a voracious reader who believes students deserve access to rich, diverse reading experiences and to a safe, equitable space to talk about what they see, hear, think and feel. She is on a journey to disrupt and bring clarity to the conversations that drive our planning and assessment in the English Language Arts classroom. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dr Bry's new theory of everything Part 12 We are getting closer to the finish line. This week the mystery of Ettore Majorana, neutrinos and dark matter.
Rocket Science 21C with Bradley Perrett (325) NASA vs Space X vs Virgin vs China vs Russia. Today's Space Race is multi-dimensional and growing. Australia is about to start its own program. Dr Karl talks with space journalist Bradley Perrett about the road ahead. drkarl.com
61 – Could the Large Hadron Collider Destroy the World? Before the LHC turned on in 2008, many feared that it would create a dangerous black hole that would destroy the world. Were any of those fears well-founded, and how seriously did scientists take these claims?Support the show
IoT Devices that have IP addresses
eInk doesn’t seem super prevalent these days in products but has advanced a long way
Repurposing grocery store displays
If you’ll be at Embedded World, Saber” id=”7hYvJpnaoAd” vid=”7hYvJpnaoAd” id-for-player=”7hYvJpnaoAd” link=”/listen/621-the-magic-of-calipers-7hYvJpnaoAd/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#621 – The Magic of Calipers Dave had a protracted battle with GitHub/Lab but found a way to upload files with drag and drop
IoT Devices that have IP addresses
eInk doesn’t seem super prevalent these days in products but has advanced a long way
Repurposing grocery store displays
If you’ll be at Embedded World, Saber from PCB Arts (episode 608) will be holding an event on Wednesday 3/15 (free to attend, need to register)
Calipers
Capliper videos
Jimmie Rogers tattoo
Sam Zeloof is starting a company to fab chip fabs with Jim Keller.  They have raised $15M, from OpenAI(?)
Former guests Matt Venn and Uri Shaked recently released SiliWiz. It helps students to learn how silicon transistors work (and therefore how ASICs are built)
Mike Englehardt is no longer at ADI (who acquired LT) working on LTSpice. His website says he is working on a new simulator to be released in May of this year.
Chris often defaults to Falstad simulator for easy circuits.
Dave is having ChatGPT write a program for him
Botsplaining
Past guest Andreas Spiess did a recent video about OpenMQTTGateway which helps you to listen to 433 devices with an ESP32.
KiCad 7.0 was released
The Mother of all Demos (Doug Engelbart)

Ellen is a science writer for UnHerd and Works in Progress. In this episode, we’re going to chat about one of her most recent articles, "The Stats Gap", which explores the issues” id=”cu8o57xF6a” vid=”cu8o57xF6a” id-for-player=”cu8o57xF6a” link=”/listen/the-stats-gap-cu8o57xF6a/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
The Stats Gap Join Ed and David as they speak to Ellen Pasternack, a PHD student in evolutionary biology at the University of Oxford. 

Ellen is a science writer for UnHerd and Works in Progress. In this episode, we’re going to chat about one of her most recent articles, "The Stats Gap", which explores the issues with statistical education for university scientists.
Fasting Fasting is an effective way to achieve personal well-being. It is an effective therapy even for chronic diseases.
Finding solace in the stars A new film Space, Hope and Charity tells the story of Charity Woodrum, an astrophysicist whose childhood dream of working for NASA was nearly derailed by a personal tragedy. Woodrum is now studying for a doctorate in galaxy quenching at the University of Arizona using data from the James Webb Space Telescope. She joins this episode of the Physics World Stories podcast to speak about finding purpose in academic research, and her gratitude to the colleagues who helped her through the darkest moments.
Podcast host Andrew Glester is also joined by the film’s director Sandy Cummings, a broadcast journalist with more than 20 years of experience working for NBC News. Cummings says she is drawn to stories of people facing huge challenges, and the quest for hope and purpose.
Space, Hope and Charity aired at this year’s American Astronomical Society annual meeting in Seattle, US. Its official premiere is at the Phoenix Film Festival with three screenings and Q&A sessions over three days, 31 March – 2 April 2023. See the trailer on YouTube.
University of Lethbridge Bookstore – Book Talk Whisperer – Kari Tanaka We are excited to meet with Kari Tanaka from the University of Lethbridge bookstore in this episode. Leveraging her years as a bookseller and dedicated book/author supporter, Kari offers many suggestions for teachers (and readers) to add to their book collections. She also shares some tips on doing a book talk that gets readers interested in the text. Kari’s excitement for great books is truly contagious, and we cannot be held responsible for the number of books you decide to buy after listening to this episode.Episode Author/Book Highlights
Wildoak by C.C. Harrington
One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate 
Delicious Monsters by Liselle Sambury
Change the Game by Colin Kaepernick 
Dreamer by Akim Aliu 
Sadie by Courtney Summers
Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt
The Lost Year: A Survival Story of the Ukrainian Famine by Catherine Marsh 
Alan Gratz 
My Suitcase: Nii Sookayis by Christina Fox
I am Quiet – A Story for the Introvert in All of Us by Andie Powers
Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

He worked at Willow Run early in his career (facility now closed)
Henry Ford Community College
Larry Sears
Having joy in the courses
The Knack
John Davis joined on a previous episode” id=”4s6IpjjAlqP” vid=”4s6IpjjAlqP” id-for-player=”4s6IpjjAlqP” link=”/listen/620-engineering-education-with-dr-don-wilcher-4s6IpjjAlqP/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#620 – Engineering Education with Dr Don Wilcher Welcome, Dr Don Wilcher! He joins us right as he’s about to release a new book, M5 Stack Electronic Blueprints

He worked at Willow Run early in his career (facility now closed)
Henry Ford Community College
Larry Sears
Having joy in the courses
The Knack
John Davis joined on a previous episode to talk about Industrial machines
What is a PLC?
Relay ladder logic
Industrial Computer vs Controller
Scan loop on a PLC
XIC / XIO
A Distributed Control System (DCS) networks many controllers together
Don taught a blueprint reading class
Chris asked about why connectors are drawn the way they are
Later in his career, Don moved from the industrial space to design in cars
Wiring harness
Body controller module
CAFE laws – California Air Fuel Economy
68hc11
Wetting current for switches
CAN
Cigarette lighters in cars
Don was working on the (Jeep) Grand Cherokee
Decoding CAN with a scope
Packard electric connectors
Cars have a “shower curtain” for water in the door
Don got his PhD and switched to education
He taugh courses like

Electric Circuits 1 / 2
Intro to robotics
Automated system and diagnosis
Electronics Industrial Maintenance


Instructors putting bugs into the system to test students
PLCs still reign supreme
Arduino recently released the Opta, which is targeted at the industrial market
Don writes for Control.com
OpenPLC is software that can run on a variety of accessible platforms (like ESP32/Arduino/etc)
Industrial I/O
OpenPLC based on IEC spec (61131-3)
Different programming styles of programming
Blackhat (movie) with Chris Hemsworth
Stuxnet worm
He wrote and article about using OpenPLC with Arduino
Dr Don has a new book that was just released! The M5 stack book
Continuing Education Courses
IEEE certificate
Dr Don will be speaking at the Embedded Online conference coming up in April
Dr Robert Simcoe, Director of MIT's Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research In this episode, Dr Simcoe spoke about his research involving spectroscopy to look back into the early universe and search for the first stars. He also spoke about another interest of his – designing and building astronomical telescopes and instruments – and how it first began when he was still in high school. Lastly, he gave us a sneak peek into the job of a director of a huge astrophysics department like MIT's Kavli institute and the work that goes in to managing it.
Ignorance is beautiful. There is difference between ignorance and ignoring. Most of the times, ignorance helps us avoiding doubt and stress. It's better to trust the process but being ignorant doesn't mean ignoring the true form of knowledge that appears in any form. My mother told me once, "Try to understand as much as you possibly can, but ignorance is beautiful."
Skeptic Success with Claire Klingenberg (324) "Alternative facts" ? Claire Klingenberg is an expert at debunking such things. In Europe she engages, listens and changes hardened conspiracy and "woo" theorists. She is the elected leader of the EU skeptics and shares her wisdom with Dr Karl. @ClaireAccendit Drkarl.com
John Preskill: From the Early Universe to the Future of Quantum Computing John Preskill is the Richard P. Feynman Professor of Physics at Caltech, a title many physicists would cherish. He is widely known in the field for his work as a theoretical physicist spearheading the field of Quantum Computing, where he is Director of Caltech’s Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, but his expertise and contributions span a far broader spectrum of topics. His background is in theoretical particle physics, gravitation, and cosmology. As a graduate student, his seminal work on the cosmological implications of magnetic monopoles in Grand Unified Theories helped lead Alan Guth to develop his theory of Inflationary Cosmology, in part to resolve a cosmological conundrum John first elucidated. Since that time, John has explored condensed matter systems and the physics of black holes, made a famous bet with Stephen Hawking, and coined the term “quantum supremacy”, to describe a metric that might reveal the first time a quantum computer resolved a problem that a classical computer could not resolve in a feasible human timescale. As Director the Caltech Institute, John leads one of the most vibrant programs exploring quantum information and quantum computation, and I was happy to have the opportunity to connect again with my old friend and colleague to discuss this rapidly evolving field, about which so much is written in the popular press, and which may impact on all of our lives in the 21st century. In our discussion we tried to separate the wheat from the chaff, to discuss the future of the field, its current state, and challenges and opportunities. In addition, we discussed his own scientific career and the physics areas that have excited him, and what helped drive him to become a physicist in the first place. It was a fascinating discussion and I am sure you will be both entertained, and enlightened. As always, an ad-free video version of this podcast is also available to paid Critical Mass subscribers. Your subscriptions support the non-profit Origins Project Foundation, which produces the podcast. The audio version is available free on the Critical Mass site and on all podcast sites, and the video version will also be available on the Origins Project Youtube channel as well. Get full access to Critical Mass at lawrencekrauss.substack.com/subscribe
Prof./Dr. Ramona Vogt (she/her): Season 3 Episode 8 I am a nuclear physicist at LNLL and UC Davis, involved in APS leadership and I run far-ish. My research involves both heavy flavor production, mostly in cold nuclear matter, and the phenomenology of nuclear fission. I love the challenge of doing physics and the rush of understanding something new. I am on the Long Range Plan writing committee, the NSAC Nuclear Data subcommittee and Secretary-Treasurer of the DNP.
https://people.llnl.gov/vogt2
My Journey as a Physicist is brought to you by PhD student Bryan Stanley (he/him/his) and Prof. Huey-Wen Lin (she/her). Season 3 is hosted by PhD student Bill Good and edited by Varalee Sakorikar.
Season 3 consists of members of the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Long Range Plan.
If you like the podcast or have any suggestions for future improvement, please take a minute to use this form to let us know: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScxRDWXM-iJ_IdVAh7ZtrnqjVpajodVMdmA3o3piLAO3u-Jxw/viewform
Prototyping tools: Chris has been laser cutting using Ponoko (and Inkscape). 3D modeling + low cost 3D print services means you could make some amazing stuff.
Dave has been finding bugs will doing scope testing
FFTs in scopes
Series 2 tektronix
There’s no con” id=”AIx7za9K2Lw” vid=”AIx7za9K2Lw” id-for-player=”AIx7za9K2Lw” link=”/listen/619-super-tecmo-bug-AIx7za9K2Lw/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#619 – Super Tecmo Bug Thunderfoot AI Video about ChatGPT
Prototyping tools: Chris has been laser cutting using Ponoko (and Inkscape). 3D modeling + low cost 3D print services means you could make some amazing stuff.
Dave has been finding bugs will doing scope testing
FFTs in scopes
Series 2 tektronix
There’s no concept of a Bug Bounty in the hardware world.
The BM786 will have a flash micro in new versions, it was previously one-time-programmable (OTP)
Past guest of the show Jay Carlson (ep 515) wrote a new post about the cheapest flash micro you can buy (it’s not the RV32). Jay has previously written about the $1 Micro and Embedded Linux.
What is the most complex prototype you could you build for $100? There should be a contest!
“The Amp Hour $100 prototype index”
FedEx took
Coral microcontroller dev board for machine learning applications
Dave is building a RetroPie with his kids (they can play Tecmo Super Bowl!)
The electric Mustang SUV has a mile of extra wire harness.
What is a wiring harness? Here’s an article about a simple harness install on a classic Mustang
Enphase has bidirectional charging for a house. Unstated: your car needs to support it
LightYear Zero company went bankrupt (shock, horror)
Carbon Offsets – Wendover
Carbon Offsets – Last Week Tonight (John Oliver)
ESG investing – A good Planet Money episode about it
Saber from PCB Arts (ep 608) will be holding a meetup on Wednesday March 15th during Embedded World! If you’ll be at Embedded World, let Chris know!
Tesla are removing AM radio…maybe because of the antenna? AM/FM chipsets are available in single silicon packages
Synthetic Biology with Professor Claudia Vickers (323) AI is hardware-based. It runs on electrons.  Synthetic biology is where Biotech meets IT. It will revolutionise manufacturing & automation. Is a simultaneous Green & IT revolution on its way? Professor Claudia Vickers tells us more. drkarl.com
60 – The Search for Extra Dimensions Learn how extra dimensions of space might appear to us, and what physicists have done to try to find them.To support our show and get ad-free episodes and other exclusives, join us for $3 a month on Patreon: https://patreon.com/whythisuniverseSupport the show
Black Holes Tune in to listen to how black holes form and their interesting properties and effects! We'll be talking about concepts involving the theory of general relativity, a singularity, time dilation, how light reacts with a black hole and generally how black holes can mess up the fabric of space-time.
Lifting Literacy in the Classroom: A conversation with Brent Gilson In this episode, we welcome Brent Gilson, a high school teacher with experience teaching at every division level in his career. This conversation includes several titles and authors for your students and offers suggestions for professional reading. We explore some of the challenges and methods to support bringing your students and ourselves into reading, what you might do to share or book talk in your classroom, and how best to use time in the class when students are reading. Genuine assessment, empowering student voice, and being open to multimodal approaches to showcase learning are just a few of the great landing points throughout this 65-minute podcast episode. You can find Brent online via Twitter (@mrbgilson) or his blog (https://thingsmrgsays.com/blog/). Brent has been part of the #G2Great Twitter conversation for educators in English for several years and has recently hosted the first of a new series folding in his love of weightlifting with his passion for literacy called #LiftingLiteracy. Its debut Twitter chat featured guest Angela Stockman as the group discussed Angela's recent books: The Teacher's Guide to Multimodal Composition K-5  and The Teacher's Guide to Multimodal Composition 6-12. Brent has presented sessions at the English Language Arts Council (ELAC) and National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) conferences. Episode Author/Book Highlights●      A Good Girl's Guide to Murder (series) by Holly Jackson ●      Arc of a Scythe (series) by Neal Shusterman ●      Jason Reynolds (author) Ghost Series (4), Long Way Down (novel in verse), and all his work really●      David Robertson – Barren Grounds and the Misewa Saga (series)●      In the Wild Light – Jeff Zentner ●      Kwame Alexander (author)●      One of Us is Lying (series) by Karen McManus●      Hands by Torrey Maldonado Professional Resources●      Pointless by Sarah Zerwin●      Disrupting Thinking by Kaylene Beers and Robert Probst●      Windows, Mirrors, and Sliding Glass Doors by Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Amitabh moved from Physics into Engineering. He did an internship at Brandeis for astophysics and radio astronomy and realized astrophysics mostly coding these days.
Kit for teaching teachers in India
There was a limited Electronics scen” id=”6TeqIOccu16″ vid=”6TeqIOccu16″ id-for-player=”6TeqIOccu16″ link=”/listen/618-refrigerators-and-robots-with-amitabh-shrivastava-6TeqIOccu16/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#618 – Refrigerators and Robots with Amitabh Shrivastava Welcome Amitabh Shrivastava of Refrigediro.org and Tinkrmind!

Amitabh moved from Physics into Engineering. He did an internship at Brandeis for astophysics and radio astronomy and realized astrophysics mostly coding these days.
Kit for teaching teachers in India
There was a limited Electronics scene in India. Amitabh grew up in Bangalore (Bengaluru)
Manufacturing in India has been growing, including in the silicon space. Chris used to work at a place that had a CM in Bangalore.
Gaming startup making tag games using LoRa
XBee
Logistics company that tracked 2 wheelers. Their breakout product was a laser scanner for packages.
Amitabh went to ITP at NYU, which is a technology and art crossover program. Past guest of the show Matt Richardson also went there.
Creative aspects vs technical aspects.
Amitabh enjoyed consulting for other artist, much like past guests Mike Harrison and Todd Bailey discussed.
Programmable Air is a kit that allows people to more easily build soft robots and use pumps.
Chris and Amitabh met at Teardown 2019. That was also the event where Chris recorded with Joshua and Zach, before recording again this year.
A “jammer gripper” is a soft robot that allows you to pick up arbitrarily shaped objects using friction.
“Backpack inflatable car” from Otherlab
Open Source Project
Programmable Air was crowdfunded on Crowd Supply. As such, it’s still available on Mouser.
The valves in the kit were meant for keurig machines. Spec sheets are super basic for mechanical components.
Chris saw Amitabh at Supercon 22 wearing a backpack refrigerator. It’s called “Refrigediro“
Amitabh gave a talk about the project at Hackaday Supercon 2022
The source of the name is “Harry potter and the methods of rational thinking“
Refrigeration is an old industry
PV=nRT
Kipp Bradford and Adam Savage video on building tiny refrigeration.
Other uses for small scale refrigeration is vaccine storage, cold chain storage.
Ammonia refrigeration allows you to keep things cold with a fire.
Gradient window cooler is a heat pump with a cool form factor. Not shipping yet though?
Modding an icemaker
Follow Amitabh on Instagram or YouTube for his latest experiments and builds. Follow him most places as “Tinkrmind”
Tim Palmer: The Primacy of Doubt Tim Palmer graduated from Oxford with a PhD in mathematical physics, working on general relativity, and got a postdoc to work with Stephen Hawking. He turned it down and moved into the field of meteorology, and then moved on to Climate Change studies, where he pioneered the development of what is called ‘ensemble forecasting’ to predict both long term climate change, as well as short term weather predictions. This technique has now become a standard in the field, and is necessary to properly account for possible chaotic behavior in atmospheric systems. Even simple classical systems can be chaotic—implying that even minute changes in initial conditions can sometimes produce dramatic variations in their later evolution. The canonical hyperbolic example is a butterfly flapping its wings in Kansas might later cause a violent storm on the Eastern Seaboard. On first glance, it may seem that this would imply all predictivity must go out the window, but over the past 40 years techniques have been developed for dealing with the so-called ‘fractal’ distributions that often result from chaotic dynamics, and as a result, it has become possible to constrain the range of possible long term outcomes of chaotic behavior. Tim Palmer has recently written a new book, entitled The Primacy of Doubt, which provides a wonderful discussion about the importance of accounting for doubt and uncertainty in a wide variety of systems, from weather to medicine, and even includes discussions of there possible implications of his ideas for the fundamentals of quantum mechanics and gravity. While I am more skeptical of his nevertheless intriguing latter arguments, Tim and I had a fascinating and informative discussion about his own experiences as a scientist, and the importance of explicitly incorporating a range of initial conditions when exploring weather and climate predictions. For many people, uncertainty is something to be avoided, but in physics, uncertainty is an inherent part of our understanding of the world, and it must be faced head-on. Being able to make quantitative predictions with likelihoods that have meaning requires it, and science is the only area of human inquiry where we can state with great quantitative accuracy what the likelihood is that a given prediction will be correct. This is a triumph of the scientific process and deserves to be better understood. In this regard, there are fewer better guides than Tim Palmer, and it was a delight to spend time with him on this podcast, which will enlighten and entertain.As always, an ad-free video version of this podcast is also available to paid Critical Mass subscribers. Your subscriptions support the non-profit Origins Project Foundation, which produces the podcast. The audio version is available free on the Critical Mass site and on all podcast sites, and the video version will also be available on the Origins Project Youtube channel as well. Get full access to Critical Mass at lawrencekrauss.substack.com/subscribe
Museum Science with Dr. Barker (322) Is fair pay for workers a modern idea? How about sustainable agriculture ? A Sydney museum has artifacts to show these are ancient concepts from far away. Should they be sent home? Dr Karl discusses the merits of archaeological repatriation with Dr. Barker. sydney.edu.au/museum drkarl.com
Prof. Lindley Winslow (she/her): Season 3 Episode 7 I am an experimental nuclear physicist at MIT. I like hiking and skiing on the weekends with my husband, three kids and our dog (the two cats usually stay home). My work centers on specialized experiments that make use of novel technology from quantum sensors to deep learning to push the bounds of what is measurable. The work is driven by big questions about the formation of our universe and how physics on the smallest scales leads to the universe we observe.
My Journey as a Physicist is brought to you by PhD student Bryan Stanley (he/him/his) and Prof. Huey-Wen Lin (she/her). Season 3 is hosted by PhD student Bill Good and edited by Varalee Sakorikar.
Season 3 consists of members of the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Long Range Plan.
If you like the podcast or have any suggestions for future improvement, please take a minute to use this form to let us know: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScxRDWXM-iJ_IdVAh7ZtrnqjVpajodVMdmA3o3piLAO3u-Jxw/viewform
Dr Bry's new theory of everything Part 9 Ligo, virgo, gravity waves and other wonders.
Dr Bry's new theory of everything Part 10 – with Neutrinos, Gravitons and Dark Matter This week I take my idea of the neutrino a little further. We take a look at what I think may be responsible for dark matter and I also give you a bit more info on the graviton.
Dr Bry's new theory of everything Part 11 – continues This week we meet the expanding universe, dark matter, dark energy, Majorana gets a mention and we wonder about the big bang.
Making spaceflight accessible to people with physical disabilities The European Space Agency (ESA) recently made history by selecting John McFall – an amputee, Paralympic sprinter and medical scientist – among its latest cohort of astronauts. McFall’s inclusion is part of an ESA parastronaut feasibility project for making human spaceflight accessible to people with physical disabilities. In the latest episode of the Physics World Stories podcast, people involved in this initiative explain why making space more accessible is not only fair but also the very essence of exploration.

The first guest is Mike Miller-Smith, chief executive of Aerobility, a UK-based charity that helps people with any disability to fly planes. Aerobility is being consulted as part of ESA’s feasibility study and the organization will share its experiences in adapting aircraft. “People often say to us: ‘when I’m flying, I’m leaving my disability on the ground’,” Miller-Smith tells podcast host Andrew Glester.
Also in the episode you will hear from Irene Di Giulio, an anatomy and biomechanics researcher at King’s College London, whose research group is also part of ESA’s initiative. Di Giulio says that almost everything we currently know about space biomechanics is based on non-disabled people, often with athlete levels of fitness. She says that small adjustments to equipment can make space far more accessible, and certain disabilities may even bring advantages in microgravity environments.
Episode 23: Director Harry Winer Harry Winer is a director, producer, and writer in the film and television industry. His television work includes Alias, Veronica Mars, Felicity, Hart to Hart, and many others. Harry is president of Smash Media and has written, directed, or produced over 25 films, including Space Camp in 1986. He is a professor at NYU and is a member of the Space Camp Hall of Fame.
The pinnacle of stereaming services: The Amp Hour+
Chris just got a new solar quote for his house, the roof shape is still too weird to make it a good option.
Thunderbirds episode
Solar city panels starting on fire
Dave is looking at upgrading his so” id=”3AbUu8CpdsD” vid=”3AbUu8CpdsD” id-for-player=”3AbUu8CpdsD” link=”/listen/617-conference-room-innovation-3AbUu8CpdsD/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#617 – Conference Room Innovation It was Australia Day when Dave and Chris recorded
The pinnacle of stereaming services: The Amp Hour+
Chris just got a new solar quote for his house, the roof shape is still too weird to make it a good option.
Thunderbirds episode
Solar city panels starting on fire
Dave is looking at upgrading his solar again, including with DC batteries
Span.io is working on smart circuit breaker boxes
The Grid book
Sydney program to use homeowners’ batteries
How many times has this guy gotten laid off? (the one scamming for 8-10 engineering jobs at a time)
Big layoffs are hitting the likes of Google, MS, Amazon
In Australia, this is called “being made redundant” or “retrenchment”
Conference room innovation for speakerphones
Tom Scott got to visit and walk on the Parkes Telescope (of The Dish fame)
Tour of the switch
Dave has timelapse video of the dish moving
Dave got to blinky with the RV32, the $0.10 RISC V processor
Self Soldering Circuits from Carl Bugeja
Water cooling inside PCBs
Coin cell cutout on a PCB

Tamsin is a climate scientist, specialising in the uncertainties of climate model predictions, particularly for ice sheets and glaciers. ” id=”9gGBs1KxiaQ” vid=”9gGBs1KxiaQ” id-for-player=”9gGBs1KxiaQ” link=”/listen/how-much-can-we-limit-the-rising-of-the-seas-9gGBs1KxiaQ/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
How much can we limit the rising of the seas? Join Aoife and Sally as they chat to Dr Tamsin Edwards about how she uses AI to predict rising sea levels, following her Turing Lecture at the Royal Institution.

Tamsin is a climate scientist, specialising in the uncertainties of climate model predictions, particularly for ice sheets and glaciers. 
Within her research, she also uses information about past climates to improve predictions for the future.
In this podcast, we will be catching up with her as she answers some of the questions that the audience submitted at the Turing Lecture which did not get asked.
Watch Tamsin's full Turing lecture here: https://youtu.be/CbEKI_LfNWA
Dr Bry's new theory of everything with Neutrinos, Gravitons and Dark Matter This week I take my idea of the neutrino a little further. We take a look at what I think may be responsible for dark matter and I also give you a bit more info on the graviton.



This episode is sponsored by
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3 Bible Axes Brief consideration of 3 Bible scriptures



This episode is sponsored by
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Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/matthew-lynn5/support
Prof. Vincenzo Cirigliano (he/his): Season 3 Episode 6 I'm a theoretical physicist at the Institute for Nuclear Theory at the University of Washington, and I also (try to) play guitar. I work on low-energy probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. I like to challenge the Standard Model and look for cracks in its fabric: at times it can be quite suspenseful, like a mystery novel.
My Journey as a Physicist is brought to you by PhD student Bryan Stanley (he/him/his) and Prof. Huey-Wen Lin (she/her). Season 3 is hosted by PhD student Bill Good and edited by Varalee Sakorikar.
Season 3 consists of members of the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Long Range Plan.
If you like the podcast or have any suggestions for future improvement, please take a minute to use this form to let us know: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScxRDWXM-iJ_IdVAh7ZtrnqjVpajodVMdmA3o3piLAO3u-Jxw/viewform
Storyteller For All Ages: A Conversation with David A. Robertson Episode 2 Reading Across the Curriculum Series Join us as we visit with David A. Robertson, award-winning Swampy Cree author from Manitoba, Canada. David shares thoughts on the writing process, his works, and collaboration processes, particularly as it relates to his graphic novel books. We also discuss book banning and the importance of diversity in the library. To that end, David shares a bit about a new project he is leading to support new and upcoming indigenous authors. David's works include illustrated story books for children, YA literature currently illustrated by the very successful Misewa Saga launched by book one "The Barren Grounds," with the fourth in the series due to be released in 2023. David's Black Water is the non-fiction story of elements of his own life and a return to the land, the children's picture book and Governor General's Award-winning, On the Trapline was based on the material from Black Water. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Welcome back to the show, Matthew Venn!

Matt was previously on Episode 467 from 2019 Supercon, before he started working on the open source toolchains and the education around them.
A bunch of news in the open source silicon space

Latest shuttle was MPW8, MPW9 coming up soon
2 new open PDKs


O” id=”5IJqd0mwXrU” vid=”5IJqd0mwXrU” id-for-player=”5IJqd0mwXrU” link=”/listen/616-open-source-tapeout-with-matthew-venn-5IJqd0mwXrU/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#616 – Open Source Tapeout with Matthew Venn

Welcome back to the show, Matthew Venn!

Matt was previously on Episode 467 from 2019 Supercon, before he started working on the open source toolchains and the education around them.
A bunch of news in the open source silicon space

Latest shuttle was MPW8, MPW9 coming up soon
2 new open PDKs


Open source tools growing, much of it comes from Google “Willy Wonka-ing” process and sponsoring the shuttle
This was driven by past guest Tim Ansell (on 501)
Tim Edwards of efabless
Claire Wolf was on the show in the past
Dan Burke talked with Matt at Supercon 2023 about the term “Tapeout”
Matt runs the  ZeroToAsicCourse youtube channel, which includes a podcast.
Global Foundries / IHP open source
What is driving the growth?

Open source tools
Google MPW
Open source PDK
RISC V


Ming Zhang on The Amp Hour talking about chiplets with ZGlue (now defunct).
If you don’t get into the lottery, you can pay efabless $10K for 300 chips
Packaging is also tough
Volume problems – What happens between 300 chips and 10K chips?
Why should people get started with trying out the open source tools?
Why are people signing up for the couse?

30-50% want to understand silicon
20% are academic — many Universities are switching to the open source toolchain
20-30% are commercial users who might want to use the info for


Reasons for going custom silicon as a business?

Security by obscurity
Space
Power
Sourcing (?)


MPW gives you about 10 sq mm
Matt put more designs onto his MPW slot, bundling even more designs (which has continued on)
OpenRAM
You could fit 25K of SRAM on 10 sq mm
#OpenSourceASICHighlight
Mohamed Kassem of eFabless was on the show in the past. eFabless highlights designs on their site.
Check out the 2022 highlight video from Matt!
Open Tapeout
FOSSI foundation runs the Latchup Conference
OSDA
India driving growth of chip design, many large scale companies also have verification teams in india
Security and “inspectability” from cloud companies
Root of trust chips – Laura from Oxide talked about this when she was on the show.
TSMC has an educational program for students in Taiwan
TinyTapeout
Extension of the course, joining designs together with a tristate bus
“Vosotros” is the “y’all” of the Spanish language
HDL is mostly controlled by the tools
OpenLane by eFabless was based on OpenRoad
TinyTapeout is meant for beginners
Uri from Wokwi (on show 599) worked with Matt on TinyTapeout
He added gates to Wokwi, which then can be connected together. The program pushes the gates out, which then can be synthesized.
You’re closer to the hardware with Wokwi than you will be with Verilog.
500-600 standard cells in tiny tapeout
The Shuttle lottery is getting harder to win
There are more TinyTapeout slots
It costs $25 for design only, $100 for chips
When you get the chip back on a PCB, you select your design (or others!) with a DIP switch
Check out what was on the TinyTapeout 2nd run
Olof Kindgren won the <a h
The good tech awards, every fusion device, damage detection in superconductors, ITER delays Dr. Leigh Ann Kesler, a consultant specializing in science communication, gives updates on the latest in fusion for this week’s episode of Fusion News. Links to the articles mentioned are included below. 1. The 2022 Good Tech Awards https://www.nytimes.com/2022/12/29/te… 2. World Survey of Fusion Devices 2022 https://www.iaea.org/publications/152… 3. Current distribution monitoring enables quench and damage detection in superconducting fusion magnets https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/36577… 4. International nuclear fusion project may be delayed by years, its head admits https://www.theguardian.com/science/2…

More bonus links on the youtube channel!
The PONG Podcast- S3E8 Oddworld Season Finale: Re-occuring visitation, Wendigo's, and a spirit needing help to cross over Join Daniel and Frater for a brand new season of in depth conversations on paranormal and supernatural phenomena as well as interviews with amazing guests and even call in episodes to hear from YOU the fans of your eperiences. Season 3 Episode 8 "Season Finale" is an oddworld episode. This means we take calls from around the globe to hear from listeners on experiences they have had with the unusual and unexplained. This episodes we talk about a mysterious man appearing again and again in a listeners dreams, another call about an experience with a possible Wendigo, and lastly a profound ghostly encounter with a lost spirit trying to find his way to the other side. "The Podcast For All Things Supernatural"Celestial Oddities Radio: Bringing you 100% real and raw underground entertainment.

Sarah (chief scientific advisor for the department for transport) recently did a Turing lecture at the Royal Institution, discussing the topic.
In this podcast, s” id=”AawpmIvg8qA” vid=”AawpmIvg8qA” id-for-player=”AawpmIvg8qA” link=”/listen/where-next-for-self-driving-vehicles-AawpmIvg8qA/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Where next for self-driving vehicles? Join Aoife and Torty as they chat with Professor Sarah Sharples about the current state of technology and AI around driverless vehicles.

Sarah (chief scientific advisor for the department for transport) recently did a Turing lecture at the Royal Institution, discussing the topic.
In this podcast, she’ll be answering a range of different questions from the evening.
Worldle
YouTube channels that do 
Chris and Dave took a Canberra trip when Chris was in Australia
Dave made a video about AI and ChatGPT
Chris could not get midjourney to make a &#8220;curly&#8221; straw and so” id=”4QRI3pl8FJh” vid=”4QRI3pl8FJh” id-for-player=”4QRI3pl8FJh” link=”/listen/615-augmented-engineering-4QRI3pl8FJh/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#615 – Augmented Engineering Dave is currently on holiday (at the time of recording), try to find him with this Tweet.
Worldle
YouTube channels that do 
Chris and Dave took a Canberra trip when Chris was in Australia
Dave made a video about AI and ChatGPT
Chris could not get midjourney to make a “curly” straw and so he did it the old fashion way. For those interested in low power, there is a webinar coming up Weds about “Sipping Cellular IoT Power”
Moving up the value chain
Collaboration and augmentation
Chris has started building his conference calendar, reach out if you’re going to be there!

Embedded World in Nuremberg Germany March 14-16
Embedded Open Source Summit / Zephyr Developer Summit in Prague, June 26-30


There was a community Maker Faire in Melbourne, Dave was suprised they are still happening.
Chipsets for mobile phones to talk to satellites
T9 text input
Starlink
New Espressif P4 Chip
PCB with built in strain gauge for weighing
MLCC capacitor cracking. AVX Ron Demco talked about that when on the show
Yearly perfomance reviews
Want to work with Chris? Check out the FAE job posting
Twitter has not collapsed, Chris lost the bet to Dave
MounRiver makes the compiler for the ch32v003.
We asked ChatGPT about a compiler company name
“A good name for an embedded compiler company could be something like “FirmwareForge” or “EmbedCompiler Technologies” or “MicroMate Compiler” which effectively communicate the company’s focus on embedded systems and compilers.”
Pete Holmes talking about not knowing
Dave used to be “advanced” by adding digital photos to lab reports
Dave’s Sony Mavica teardown
Elizabeth Kolbert: Can human technology solve unintended consequences of human technology Note: Due to internet difficulties due to storms in California delaying uploading of the video, the video post of this podcast will be delayed by a few hours. We are thus releasing the audio version now. (Usually these are released at the same time.) Seven years ago I invited Elizabeth Kolbert to participate in a dialogue about Extinctions at the Orpheum Theater in Phoenix, following the publication of her Pulitzer Prizewinning masterpiece, The Sixth Extinction. Once we began The Origins Podcast, I knew that I wanted to have an in depth discussion with her about her work reporting on science issues, most importantly on climate change and other technological challenges facing modern society. An opportunity arose with the publication of her most recent book, Under a White Sky, which focuses on how scientists, and politicians, have attempted—with with widely varying degrees of success—to address the unintended consequences of various human alterations of terrestrial ecosystems. It is a fascinating book, told, as is typical in her writing, by relating personal experiences as Elizabeth has traveled the world to meet scientists and others spearheading attempts at solving sometimes urgent ecological crises induced as a result of the application of previous human technologies. Elizabeth writes so clearly about science that I wanted to explore her own journey, from a student focusing on German literature, to one of the pre-eminent science writers in the country, working as a staff writer for The New Yorker Magazine. We had a wide ranging discussion about her own experiences and then moved on to discuss more broadly the issues raised in her most recent books. Incidentally, the title of her new book comes from the fact that one of the side-effects of solar geoengineering, which I expect will be an inevitable response to climate change in a world where governments and businesses prefer to carry on business as usual in spite of concerns about rising temperatures, sea levels, and other potentially dangerous consequences of increasing CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere. The effect in question, if aerosols are injected in the upper atmosphere to reduce the intensity of solar radiation impinging on the earth’s surface, will be to cause formerly bright blue skies to instead resemble the whiter skies those who live in big cities are used to. A potentially unfortunate consequence, but perhaps less unfortunate than other potential consequences of global climate change. The conversation was fantastic. Everything I had hoped for. We went on for over 2 hours, but the time passed quickly because it was so fascinating. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. And by the way, if you enjoy this podcast, Elizabeth will be joining the Origins Project Foundation Galapagos Travel Adventure in January of 2024. Reservations will open up at the beginning of April for this exciting trip, with Elizabeth, Frans de Waal, me, and 33 other Origins voyagers. I hope you can join us.As always, an ad-free video version of this podcast is also available to paid Critical Mass subscribers. Your subscriptions support the non-profit Origins Project Foundation, which produces the podcast. The audio version is available free on the Critical Mass site and on all podcast sites, and the video version will also be available on the Origins Project Youtube channel as well. Get full access to Critical Mass at lawrencekrauss.substack.com/subscribe
Dr Bry's new theory of everything in 2023 Ligo, virgo, gravity waves and other wonders.
59 – The End of Everything (Ft. Katie Mack) Special guest Katie Mack talks to us about how the universe might end.To support our show and get ad-free episodes and other exclusives, join us for $3 a month on Patreon: https://patreon.com/whythisuniverseSupport the show
Valley of the Birdtail: Reading Across the Curriculum Book Talk Series Episode 1 In this episode, Charlie Kraig and Rick Gilson of ARPDC visit with the authors Andrew Stobo Sniderman and Douglas Sanderson (Amo Binashii) of Valley of the Birdtail: An Indian Reserve, A White Town, and the Road to Reconciliation. Our conversation touches on stories from the book, how the authors came to work on this project and collaborated in the writing process, as well as how teachers might use the book in your classroom both for its content and as a mentor text. In addition to our recommendation that every teacher in Canada should read this book, we believe that every junior and senior high classroom and school library would be well-served by adding a copy or two to the bookshelf. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Alvaro Prieto is a co-host of The Unnamed Reverse Engineering podcast and has co-hosted The Amp Hour before. He currently works at Sofar Ocean.

363 
456.2
440.2
440.3


Ariel Briner was on episo” id=”2O7CqfgKC0X” vid=”2O7CqfgKC0X” id-for-player=”2O7CqfgKC0X” link=”/listen/614-reunion-impedance-matching-and-2023-predictions-2O7CqfgKC0X/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#614 – Reunion Impedance Matching and 2023 Predictions For the first week of the new year, we welcome back some past guests to talk about electronics in 2023.

Alvaro Prieto is a co-host of The Unnamed Reverse Engineering podcast and has co-hosted The Amp Hour before. He currently works at Sofar Ocean.

363 
456.2
440.2
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Ariel Briner was on episode 260 of the show talking about CartesianCo, a now defunct startup. Ariel now runs an 8 person consulting shop in SF called Electron Labs.
Chris Osterwood was on episode 425 talking about Capable Robot Components, which he is still working on. They are preparing to release new hardware in 2023.
State of robotics
Possible to have consulting with robotics?
We were recording during CES 2023
AgTech
Robotic pizza
3H meetup
Modex Fulfilment(conference)
IoT
Electron labs projects are 30% IoT, but more are connected (50%+)
iPhone globalstar connection is now possible and Iridium is coming soon.
Alvaro uses Blues Wireless modems to do firmware updates on buoys near the shore. Ray Ozzie (founder and CEO of Blues) was on episode 603.
Bugs in different locations due to unicode characters (or null characters)
FreeRTOS vs Zephyr
STM32U5 has DMA in stopmode, which is a low power option for DMA
Alvaro has been creating Joulescope front plates
What kind of mix of hw and software are each person doing?
USB C cable tester
ESP32-C3 is a RISC V wifi chip from Espressif. There is also support for Rust on that and some other Espressif chips (Chris Osterwood has been trying it out)
Hubris OS from Oxide. Oxide engineer Laura Abbott talked about this when she was on the show. Another Oxide engineer Rick Altherr was on the show (before he worked there)
Board bringup is a hardware activity for fimware engineers.
Firmware with hardware when the power rails are controlled by the micro
CM4 / Linux
Buildroot vs Yocto
Custom vs dev board
Chaos camp
Mark Rober video (car breakins)
RISC V
AI
Midjourney
ChatGPT
Is it all just “Stochastic BS”?



This episode is sponsored by
· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/matthew-lynn5/support” id=”2swNk7vYA6H” vid=”2swNk7vYA6H” id-for-player=”2swNk7vYA6H” link=”/listen/episode-2-orientation-2swNk7vYA6H/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Episode 2: Orientation some reflection on the first 4 hermetic principles



This episode is sponsored by
· Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/matthew-lynn5/support
The PONG Podcast- S3E7 The Philadelphia Experiment Join Daniel and Frater for a brand new season of in depth conversations on paranormal and supernatural phenomena as well as interviews with amazing guests and even call in episodes to hear from YOU the fans on your experiences. Season 3 Episode 7 we discuss The Philadelphia Experiment. The Philadelphia Experiment was an alleged event claimed to have been witnessed by an ex-merchant mariner named Carl M. Allen at the United States Navy's Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States, sometime around October 28, 1943. Allen described an experiment where the U.S. Navy attempted to render invisible the destroyer escort USS Eldridge and the bizarre results that followed.
Waves at boundaries for National 5 Physics National 5 Physics Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. This episode covers:• Refraction• DiffractionResources: • Questions for this topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Physics/SQA/National-5/Waves-at-boundaries • Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf • Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring • Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Holiday Edition Part 2, Science Matters: How the Universe Made your Holiday Gifts In December it was announced that the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory National Ignition facility has achieved its first goal of “Ignition”, in which 192 powerful lasers focused on a small pellet of fuel led to a sustained fusion reaction for a fraction of a second that released more energy than it received from the incident laser light. Following on requests from many readers, I describe the science behind this experiment, and the wishful thinking associated with it, regarding the possible use of fusion as an unlimited power source for humanity in the future. This special holiday edition of Science Matters accompanies our last podcast, with Augusten Burroughs, which was about another kind of wishful thinking. I hope you enjoy this science as much as I hope you enjoyed that delightful discussion with a wonderful writer. Happy Holidays from Critical Mass, The Origins Foundation, the Origins Podcast, and from me. Get full access to Critical Mass at lawrencekrauss.substack.com/subscribe
Dr Gina Panopoulou, Assistant professor, Chalmers University of Technology In this episode, Dr Panopoulou spoke about how every galaxy has a magnetic field, and by using the polarisation of light we are able to map the structure of this field in our galaxy. We talked about the difficulties of doing this, including the limited information the polarisation of light can convey and how hard it is to check the accuracy of any results.
Origins Podcast Wishful-Thinking Holiday Edition Part 1: A Dialogue with Augusten Burroughs: A Witch or Not A Witch I want to be upfront. I love Augusten Burroughs. I fell in love with him when I first read Running with Scissors, and every time I have picked up anything he has written, I have that warm feeling knowing I will delight in the scrumptious experience that is associated with reading his work. Shortly after creating the Origins Podcast in 2019, I discovered that Augusten was going to have a new book coming out, and I contacted him to ask if he might come by the studio and do a podcast if his book tour passed nearby. To my great happiness, he said he would love to come by and would send me a prepublication copy of the book so I might prepare. So it was that I received Toil and Trouble: A Memoire, and discovered to my surprise that it was a memoir describing his, and his mother’s experiences as witches. I read the book carefully and tried to decide what to do. The dilemma was somewhat similar to that I faced when I wrote The Physics of Star Trek. I didn’t want to write a book that would simply say “This won’t work” over and over again. Similarly, I didn’t want to offer blanket denials of Augusten’s claims. Instead, I decided I would try and use the opportunity to discuss science and skepticism and apply those ideas to various examples in the book. After we finished the podcast, we weren’t sure when the right time to release it would be. I didn’t want to cast any negative shadows on the book during its initial release, and I wanted to time it appropriately after we had amassed a catalog of podcasts with scientists and artists that would give some perspective on the discussion we had. When we thought about a holiday edition podcast the dialogue with Augusten came to mind. I confess I had forgotten the details and was a little worried. I needn’t have worried, however. I had forgotten how much fun it was, and how much fun any conversation with Augusten can be. Moreover, he comes at almost all ideas and experiences with the characteristics of a scientist. He is realistic, skeptical, and willing to be wrong. It is so refreshing. We began the podcast by once again discussing his dysfunctional childhood, which he covers so beautifully in a number of his books. It is a fascinating dive into issues of mental illness, and victimhood, the latter of which he happily demonstrates is in the eye of the beholder. But the purpose of this discussion is to put in context the discovery, when he was a young boy, that he was a witch. A discovery revealed by his mother, who told him that he came from a long of witches after he has an experience that he would describe as a sort of remote sensing, associated with an accident his grandmother had. From there we discuss more modern examples. I truly enjoyed listening to Augusten again in the podcast, which presents, in my mind, a good example of how to have a difficult but respectful conversation, and how science and skepticism can and should be applied to wishful thinking—something that Augusten would certainly agree with. As Richard Feynman once said, after all: The easiest person to fool is yourself. Throughout, Augusten is charming and enjoyable, and listening to him describe his own experiences is alone worth the listen. I hope you enjoy this part 1 of our Holiday Podcast. Part 2 will be released after Xmas, and is a special holiday edition of Science Matters, where I discuss wishful thinking associated with a scientific development that dominated much of the media earlier this month. I hope you enjoy both, complementary discussions. As always, an ad-free video version of this podcast is also available to paid Critical Mass subscribers. Your subscriptions support the non-profit Origins Project Foundation, which produces the podcast. The audio version is available free on the Critical Mass site and on all podcast sites, and the video version will also be available on the Origins Project Youtube channel as well. Get full access to Critical Mass at lawrencekrauss.substack.com/subscribe
Mars #2 with Dr Adrian Brown (321) On the surface of Mars, the NASA Perseverance Rover is bottling rocks to be returned to Earth. How will they get back? Why are the samples so valuable? Dr Brown, Australian Scientist with the mission, has the latest news in the second part of his discussion with Dr Karl. @DrAdrianJBrown1 drkarl.com
Waves for National 5 Physics National 5 Physics Revision with Jonas provides you with easy-to-follow theory and examples. With years of experience Jonas helps students to improve their confidence and skills so that they would be able to succeed in their exams. This episode covers:• Types of waves• Frequency• Wavelength• Electromagnetic wavesResources: • Questions for this topic: https://studysquare.co.uk/test/Physics/SQA/National-5/Waves • Exam Revision Guide: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/pdf • Online tutoring: https://www.studysquare.co.uk/tutoring • Podcast Privacy policy: https://www.spreaker.com/privacy
Robin Ince and the joy of popular-science books Long-term listeners will know that the December episode of Physics World Stories is a celebration of the year’s best popular-science writing. This year, Andrew Glester is joined by comedian and writer Robin Ince, author of the recent book The Importance of Being Interested: Adventures in Scientific Curiosity and host of the longstanding BBC Radio 4 science show The Infinite Monkey Cage, co-presented with the physicist Brian Cox.

Ince talks about his circular journey with science: from enjoying it as a child, to feeling disengaged as a young adult, to now building his entire creative output around his fascination with the natural world. In an entertaining conversation, Ince talks about the importance of critical thinking and how he longs for a society that celebrates the beauty of uncertainty.
Also in the episode, Physics World editors discuss the following books, reviewed in the latest issue of the magazine:
First Dawn: From the Big Bang to Our Future in Space by Roberto Battiston
Horizons: a Global History of Science by James Poskett
Nomad Century: How to Survive the Climate Upheaval by Gaia Vince
Dr Bry's new theory of everything part 8 Mbappe, black holes, supernovas and me struggling to say Magellanic cloud. What's not to love.

Jeff has been at his place in Seattle since 2018
Previously when he was in Redmond, he put his antenna up in the trees
This year Jeff set up antennas at his new place
New things in Amateur radio, SDRs
ICOM IC705 portable
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#613 – It’s a Keyzermas Miracle! Merry Keyzermas, 2022! Jeff Keyzer of Mightohm.com joins the show once again.

Jeff has been at his place in Seattle since 2018
Previously when he was in Redmond, he put his antenna up in the trees
This year Jeff set up antennas at his new place
New things in Amateur radio, SDRs
ICOM IC705 portable
Sunspot cycles impact how far you can communicate
5-10 watts in the backyard
Taking ham radio setup camping
Crater lake
Goldeneye antenna coming out of a lake (Aricibo, now busted)
Cape Disappointment
Parks on the Air
“2022…which is this year”
Long Beach Washington kite festival
Jeff put an antenna on a kite
Doers vs talking in amateur radio
FT8 mode
QRZ.com
IC7300 brought people back
Alan Wolke YouTube channel
Jeff hasn’t been doing much consulting
Kit business gangbusters because of Ukraine
Atmel DIP parts are easier to get than other Atmel parts (but still not easy)
Eurorack companies closing
Test equipment upgrade
8753D
Agilent took down legacy resources
Fixing test equipment as a way to learn
53310A
Can’t just get a piece of test equipment on a whim
GPS connected to MDA can get parts per billion (!)
Plot frequency vs time
Saluki
Fusion news
Hotplate vs oven for reflow
Making generated art (couldn’t pass up the Clark Griswold reference, sorry)
A BIG fusion announcement and our end of year wrap-up! 2022 has been a monumental year for fusion; this week alone was immensely groundbreaking. In today’s episode of Fusion News, Cyd Cowley, PhD student at the University of York, gives updates on some of the major fusion developments from this year (as a continuation from the highlight episode published over the summer).
Mars #1 with Dr Adrian Brown (320) While planet earth was in Covid lockdown, a NASA spacecraft left for Mars. Perseverance ("Percy" to its friends)  is on a mission to unlock planetary secrets. Dr Adrian Brown gives Dr Karl the latest news from the Martian surface. @DrAdrianJBrown1 drkarl.com
Dr Bry's new ToE Part 7 – Gravity This week we have a bit more on general relativity and why I think we are all wrong about ignoring it when it comes to the neutrino.

Listener points out Dave said to slap him in Episode 255 if he ever said he was getting a pick and place. Dave stated as much in episode #610
Dave posted a bunker tour and clean up video on Odyssey
10 cent micro showed up to Chris’s lab (discussed in #610)
The tooling has a windows” id=”4ZGkWY1G53E” vid=”4ZGkWY1G53E” id-for-player=”4ZGkWY1G53E” link=”/listen/612-slapping-industries-4ZGkWY1G53E/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#612 – Slapping Industries Show notes

Listener points out Dave said to slap him in Episode 255 if he ever said he was getting a pick and place. Dave stated as much in episode #610
Dave posted a bunker tour and clean up video on Odyssey
10 cent micro showed up to Chris’s lab (discussed in #610)
The tooling has a windows focus, the toolchain is called MounRiver. There is some OpenOCD tooling specifically for it.
GitHub repos open a web based VScode window when you hit “.” (period). You need to be logged in.
Discussion on embedded.fm 435 about GitHub codespaces
Christmas lights
Arduino is targeting the industrial market with the Opta “microPLC”. They will have ladder logic for this device.
John Davis was on episode 385 talking about the difficulties of working in a machine building environment.
A new part from Sony/Altair, the ALT1350, looks like it has EVERYTHING in it: Cellular, GPS, WiFi (hotspot finding only), 2.4GHz / 802.15.4, sub Gig. So many radios!
Lock teardowns
Artemis
The Grid (book)

Automated transcript
00:19.99
Dave
Welcome to the amp hour I’m Dave Jones from the EeV blog
00:24.37
chrisgammell
And I’m Chris Gammell of the slapping industries because I am supposed to be slapping you.
00:30.24
Dave
Well oh I know what this is about right? Thank you to the person who put this on who do who did who put it on the silly lie and yeah, thank you very much got the most up votes. Yeah, go ahead. Do it do it. Although I haven’t technically got 1
00:36.26
chrisgammell
Ah, five days ago yeah this is this this silly lion.
00:43.43
chrisgammell
Yeah, yeah, yeah, okay here we go here. We go ladies and gentlemen in the light of last week’s episode I just wanted to say that in episode number two fifty five at timestamp Fifty Six Twenty Dave says that quote.
00:47.77
Dave
So you know and.
01:00.31
chrisgammell
You ever hear me utter. The the words I’m contemplating getting a pick in place just you know slap me. Thank you and happy holidays. Fantastic! What a great callback? Yeah yeah there we go all right? all It’s okay, yeah.
01:07.57
Dave
Ah, ah, ah or cheese and ah oh I think I’ve come to my senses I well was I thinking. Ah oh boy. Yeah, um, so yeah, so trust some nerd to remember.
01:20.52
chrisgammell
And yeah, well I mean that’s I have to wonder like were they just now listening were they to listen to it recently or they have like photographic memory. Yeah, right, Very impressive.
01:25.78
Dave
Right? Remember Well did they actually pull that out of their memory bank I wouldn’t surprise me if they pulled that out of their memory bank because I can still say oh yeah I can remember that in in you know, an episode ah episode and a copy of.
01:44.83
chrisgammell
And yeah, yeah, it probably means that they they they had something in their memory that they they’re like yeah I really would like to see Dave slapped.
01:45.10
Dave
Electronicks Australia Magazine back in 1985 there was this article that said blah blah blah blah blah you know like I can probably pull that out of my ass. But.
01:57.77
Dave
Right? Slap me right? Yeah possibly Yep yep I don’t know I’d like ah I don’t know what triggered it I don’t know.
02:04.26
chrisgammell
Ah.
02:09.15
chrisgammell
What the the urge to get a I think it is completely natural I Think here’s here’s the thing the ah the I think the journey often goes like this.
02:10.15
Dave
The ah the the lust for a pick and yeah, the urge to
Footballers on Twitter: What is fair game? This week we are joined by Manchester United women's footballer Aoife Mannion, Author and CEO of Glitch Seyi Akiwowo and Turing Researcher Pica Johansson to discuss online abuse suffered by football players and other athletes online. The Turing recently partnered with OfCom, who comissioned a report in relation to its upcoming role as the UK’s Online Safety regulator tracking abuse on Twitter against football players in the 2021-22 Premier League Season. You can read more on this report here: Tracking abuse on Twitter against football players in the 2021-22 Premier League Season | The Alan Turing Institute
58 – The Risks of Science Populism In today's different type of episode, we talk about the risks of a subtle kind of scientific misinformation.Support the show
Coral Health with Dr. Wachenfeld (319) The world's largest coral reef is in trouble. Chief Scientist for Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, Dr Wachenfeld, talks with Dr Karl about what he is seeing. Twenty five years ago waves of hot water were first measured. They continue with intensity. Will the COP Accords be enough to save our reefs?   gbrmpa.gov.au drkarl.com
An Origins Podcast EXCLUSIVE: A Dialogue with Cormac McCarthy About Science, on the occasion of his newest book releases Cormac McCarthy is a literary icon. Winner of the National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award for his novel All the Pretty Horses, and the Pulitzer Prize for his apocalyptic novel The Road, Norma’s earlier novel, Blood Meridian has been labelled The Great American Novel. Many people did not know that this cultural giant is also fascinated by, and amazingly knowledgeable about science. Reading his newest books, The Passenger and Stella Maris (released this week!), however, and that becomes obvious. The protagonists are mathematical and physics prodigies, and just as one may requires a dictionary to keep up with the the remarkably diverse prose in Cormac’s writing, some people may need to consult some popular books on science to fully appreciate the scientific asides sprinkled throughout both volumes. I first met Cormac at the Santa Fe Institute back when I was considering a possible position there as its Director, some years ago. I was shocked to walk into the kitchenette there and discover him, as I had no idea that is where he spent his time. But, as we discuss in our dialogue, he moved to Santa Fe at the invitation of Nobel Laureate physicist Murray Gell Mann to join the new Institute. Cormac and I became fast friends then, and have remained friends ever since. The best hour of radio I ever did was with Cormac and Werner Herzog, on the occasion of Herzog’s film Cave of Forgotten Dreams, where both Cormac and Werner talked with amazing authority about the evolution paleontology of early modern humans. Then later, he honored me by asking if he could copyedit the paperback version of my book Quantum Man, a scientific biography of Richard Feynman. He said he wanted to make the paperback version ‘perfect’, in part by removing all exclamation marks and semicolons.. Of course I said yes, and we added his name as copyeditor on the front page! I have known that Cormac is extremely reluctant to appear in public or do interviews. He agreed to appear in our film The Unbelievers, which was a great gift, but has often demurred when I have asked him to appear in other public panels on subjects we love to talk about in private. So, when I asked him if, on the occasion of the publication of his new books, the first books in 16 years, if we could sit down and record a conversation about science for The Origins Podcast, I was shocked and thrilled when he agreed. He is 89 years old now, and I was so pleased to have the chance to record some of his thoughts on science for posterity.He invited us into his home for an afternoon conversation after a long lunch, and the conversation that ensued was much like the conversations we have had over the years. Cormac loves to discuss science, but prefers to listen to physicists talk about their work rather than initiate conversations. He is, after all, notoriously laconic. But when he does speak about science, his insights are fascinating. Using some of the ideas discussed in his new books a launching points, our discussion ranged over quantum mechanics, the role of mathematics in science, and whether there will ever be a theory of everything. There were a variety of challenges that day, including the difficulty of filming something in a sunlight room without window shades, but the end result was unique and memorable. I hope you agree. As always, an ad-free video version of this podcast is also available to paid Critical Mass subscribers. Your subscriptions support the non-profit Origins Project Foundation, which produces the podcast. The audio version is available free on the Critical Mass site and on all podcast sites, and the video version will also be available on the Origins Project Youtube channel as well. Get full access to Critical Mass at lawrencekrauss.substack.com/subscribe
The PONG Podcast-S3E6 Listeners Encounters: Ouija gone wrong, Shadow Creature, Strange Lights & More! Join Daniel and Frater for a brand new season of in depth conversations on paranormal and supernatural phenomena as well as interviews with amazing guests and even call in episodes to hear form YOU the fans obn your experiences.Season 3 Episode 6 is a Oddworld episode. This means we take calls from around the globe to hear from listeners on experiences they have had with the unusual or unexplained. Thonight's episode we will hear about what happens when things go wrong duirng a Ouija board session, strange sightings of a shadow figure, unexplained lights in the sky and much more. The Podcast For All Things SupernaturalCelestial Oddities Radio: Bringing you 100% real and raw underground entertainment.
Welcome Joshua Vasquez of The Allen Institute and the Jubilee Project and Zach Fredin of Commonwealth Fusion Systems!

Background

This is a special show because I (Chris) found a 2019 record” id=”3vZBTDS03iF” vid=”3vZBTDS03iF” id-for-player=”3vZBTDS03iF” link=”/listen/611-grad-school-time-capsule-with-joshua-and-zach-3vZBTDS03iF/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
#611 – Grad School Time Capsule with Joshua and Zach Joshua Vasquez of The Allen Institute and the Jubilee Project and Zach Fredin of Commonwealth Fusion Systems
Welcome Joshua Vasquez of The Allen Institute and the Jubilee Project and Zach Fredin of Commonwealth Fusion Systems!

Background

This is a special show because I (Chris) found a 2019 recording during Teardown (other shows were released from that event). Somehow the show with Joshua and Zach was never published, I think because I found it on my recorder much later.
The 2019 show (starting at 1:31:00 on the recording) was when Joshua had been in grad school at the University of Washington for 1 year and Zach was getting ready to go to grad school at MIT at the Center for Bits and Atoms (CBA). Both were intending to get their PhD.
I caught up with Joshua and Zach at the 2022 Hackaday Superconference in early November (discussed on 610) and learned that they had both left their PhD program with a Master’s Degree and now were back in industry, working at some very cool new jobs.
I thought it would be an interesting experiment to record with them again in 2022 and get their perspectives on grad school…but I didn’t let them hear the 2019 show first.


The Jubilee Project is a toolchanger on a CNC machine / gantry.
Zach had been on the show before for Neurotinker
Zach worked on Reconfigurable computation systems
NMR
Joshua joined University of Washington to work with past guest Nadya Peek
“Fabricatability”
Kinematic coupling, which is a method of exact constraint
It’s like “Free body diagrams but in reverse”
Bal-tec precision balls
Joshua contacted a seller on alibaba and has an 8 mm ball with M3 threaded hole made for other people wanting to build a Jubilee
Hackaday vocabulary of parts
Misumi
Jubilee project long term? Still going, some people building the project still. Filistruder makes a kit based on it.
Jubilee Discord community
The community is working on some specialized heads, like a sonicator head
Zach was working on nuclear magnetic resonance, trying to make containers that could withstand 7 million rpm / 112 kHz.
Using the machine they were able to get the molecular spectrum (like mass spectrometry) of things like brain plaque for Alzheimers research.
PI = Principal Investigator
Work is continuing on the microadjusters and making diamond tubes
What are the downsides of grad school?

Getting to work on the things you want to work on
Balancing Research and Development


Prior to grad school, Joshua was at a synthetic biology company. He was “the human who would write software for hardware” and building machines for their manufacturing capabilities.
E3D toolchanger
Was drudgery part of the process?
Zach gives cautionary advice for grad students: “Early on you need to learn how to evaluate rabbit holes” (note this advice when listening to the 2019 section)
Tidal forces
How to make almost anything
Joshua says that in grad school, “the projecting part of you becomes weaponized. [It was] was near and dear to who I was”
A lot of work before grad school was trade secret
Joshua’s current work i
1. British nuclear fusion start-up plans $570m reactor
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2022/11/27/” id=”3EhpdTpIPsG” vid=”3EhpdTpIPsG” id-for-player=”3EhpdTpIPsG” link=”/listen/uk-fusion-start-up-plans-reactor-tae-win-calcompetes-grant-beis-commit-120million-cnl-and-first-ligh-3EhpdTpIPsG/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
UK fusion start-up plans reactor, TAE win CalCompetes Grant, BEIS commit £120million, CNL and First Light partner up and tripling the fusion energy product A summary of the most recent fusion news presented by Emre Yildirim, PhD Student in Materials for fusion energy at the University of Manchester. All the links from the discussed stories are below:
1. British nuclear fusion start-up plans $570m reactor
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2022/11/27/british-nuclear-fusion-start-up-plans-570m-reactor/
2. Clean Fusion Energy Leader TAE Technologies Wins $17.4M CalCompetes Grant
https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/clean-fusion-energy-leader-tae-technologies-wins-17-4m-cal-competes-grant-301682414.html
3. BEIS commits over £120 million to spearhead nuclear fusion innovation
https://www.current-news.co.uk/news/beis-commits-over-120-million-to-spearhead-nuclear-fusion-innovation
4. CNL and First Light Fusion Partner to Explore Tritium Extraction Technologies
https://www.cnl.ca/cnl-and-first-light-fusion-partner-to-explore-tritium-extraction-technologies/
https://www.world-nuclear-news.org/Articles/Canadian-collaboration-sets-goal-of-commercial-fus
5. Covering a cylinder with a magnetic coil triples its energy output in nuclear fusion test
https://phys.org/news/2022-11-cylinder-magnetic-triples-energy-output.html
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In addition to explaining his company’s technology innovations, Kennedy also speaks about what it’s like day-to-day working in quantum computing. Spoiler alert: he loves it. “OQC are hiring all sorts of roles that transcend quantum information because we’re building a world-class company. So if anyone wants to join the quantum revolution, we’re always looking,” he says.
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Prof. Grigory Rogachev (he/him): Season 3 Episode 5 I am a physicist at Texas A&M University focusing on experimental nuclear physics, and I also like playing tennis and golf, fishing and reading books. I use particle accelerators to study structure of atomic nuclei and nuclear reactions relevant for nucleosynthesis in stars. I love what I do because my experiments help advance general understanding of nuclei and origin of elements in the universe. Working on the nuclear physics Long-Range Plan is a fascinating opportunity to learn about recent advances in the field and contribute to shaping the future of nuclear physics for many years.
https://physics.tamu.edu/directory/rogachev/
My Journey as a Physicist is brought to you by PhD student Bryan Stanley (he/him/his) and Prof. Huey-Wen Lin (she/her). Season 3 is hosted by PhD student Bill Good and edited by Varalee Sakorikar.
Season 3 consists of members of the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Long Range Plan.
If you like the podcast or have any suggestions for future improvement, please take a minute to use this form to let us know: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScxRDWXM-iJ_IdVAh7ZtrnqjVpajodVMdmA3o3piLAO3u-Jxw/viewform
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