Group 4 Created with Sketch.
Your changes have been saved

1861: The first Battle of Bull Run

Duration: 04:04
On July 21, 1861, a hot and dry summer Sunday, Union and Confederate troops clashed outside Manassas, Virginia, in the first major engagement of the Civil War, the First Battle of Bull Run. Union General McDowell hoped to march his men across a small stream called Bull Run in the vicinity of Manassa
Snippets are a new way to share audio!
You can clip a small part of any file to share, add to playlist, and transcribe automatically. Just click the to create your snippet!
Snippets: Clips of 1861: The first Battle of Bull Run that people like
There are currently no snippets from 1861: The first Battle of Bull Run.
Snippets are an easy way to highlight your favorite soundbite from any piece of audio and share with friends, or make a trailer for This Date in Weather History
Playlists that 1861: The first Battle of Bull Run appears on.
There are currently no playlists containing this audio.
Add this audio track to one of your playlists
Add to Playlist
Up Next
Full Description
Back to Top
On July 21, 1861, a hot and dry summer Sunday, Union and Confederate troops clashed outside Manassas, Virginia, in the first major engagement of the Civil War, the First Battle of Bull Run. Union General McDowell hoped to march his men across a small stream called Bull Run in the vicinity of Manassas, Va. that was well-guarded by a force of Confederates under General Beauregard. McDowell needed to find a way across the stream and through the Southern line that stretched for over six miles along the banks of Bull Run. McDowell launched a small diversionary attack at the Stone Bridge while marching the bulk of his force north around the Confederates’ left flank. The march was slow, but McDowell’s army crossed the stream easily because the weather leading up the the battle had been dry and the stream was running at a low level. Some of Beauregard’s troops, recognizing that the attack at Stone Bridge was just a diversion, fell back just in time to meet McDowell’s oncoming force. The battle raged for several hours on top of Henry Hill, with each side taking control of the hill more than once. Slowly, more and more Southern men poured onto the field to support the Confederate defense, and Beauregard’s men pushed the Northerners back. At this point in the battle, Confederate General Barnard Bee attempted to rally his weary men by pointing to Brigadier General Thomas Jackson who stood his ground in the face of the Union assault. Bee cried, “There stands Jackson like a stone wall!” From that moment on, Thomas Jackson was known as “Stonewall” Jackson. As the day wore on, the strength of McDowell’s troops was sapped by the continuous arrival of fresh Southern reinforcements and the intense heat of the summer day with temperatures in the 90s and Union troops in heavy wool uniforms. Eventually, the Northerners began to retreat across Bull Run. The Union pullout began as an orderly movement. However, when the bridge over Cub Run was destroyed, cutting off the major route of retreat, it degenerated into a rout. The narrow roads and fords, clogged by the many carts, wagons, and buggies full of people who had driven out from Washington, D.C., to see the spectacle, hampered the withdrawal of the Union Army. The heat had done in the Union tr Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices
Up Next
Add to playlist
New playlist

Embed

COPY
Embed Options
Create Playlist
Select the Station you want to upload this audio to
Station
0 / 140
0 / 2000
Playlist Icon Image:
(.jpg, .png, min size 500x500px)
Privacy
Subscribers
Your
voice
matters.
Discover & Listen to the world’s largest free collection of audio
Password reset

Enter your email address that you used to register. We'll send you an email with your username and a link to reset your password.



If you still need help, contact Vurbl Support
Password reset sent

You have been sent instructions on resetting you password to the email associated with your account. Please check your email and signing in again.


Back to Sign In
If you still need help, contact Vurbl Support
Your
voice
matters.
Discover & Listen to the world’s largest free collection of audio
Reset password

Please enter your new password below.



If you still need help, contact Vurbl Support
Your voice matters.
Discover & Listen to the world’s largest free collection of audio
Verify Email

Enter your email address that you used to register. We'll send you an email with a link to verify your email.



Cancel
Delete Profile
Are you sure? We will miss you :'(
Delete
Delete Audio
Are you sure?
Delete
Delete Playlist
Are you sure you want to delete this playlist?
Delete
Notifications Mark all as read
    You currently have no notifications
    Edit Snippet
    0 / 140
    0 / 140