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Snippet of Boss Files with Poppy Harlow: Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Privacy, AI, and His Upbringing

From Audio: Google CEO Sundar Pichai

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Boss Files with Poppy Harlow
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Listen now to an audio snippet of “Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Privacy, AI, and His Upbringing” from Boss Files with Poppy Harlow. Misinformation and hate speech on YouTube.
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Listen now to an audio snippet of “Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Privacy, AI, and His Upbringing” from Boss Files with Poppy Harlow. Misinformation and hate speech on YouTube.
CNN's Poppy Harlow explores the journeys of business and global leaders. In-depth interviews with leadership advice from entrepreneurs, CEOs and innovators about what it takes to rise to the top.
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guy. So let's start really big picture. What is Google today? You search company? Are you an ad company? Are you an AI company? In our core level, we want to be helpful to users in moments big and small, through the course off their day on. Be giving you driving directions or be it helping show your photos back when you need it. And we want to do it for billions of users at moments that matter. But you've you've said you said at Google Io recently. We're moving from a company that helps you find answers to a company that helps you get things done on. Let that left me wanting to know Is the company fundamentally changing because of a I Because of a I we can doom or on our users demand more in the past. They may be okay. We're just getting an answer. But maybe now today, if they want toe goto a restaurant, they actually want that reservation done. So we're constantly pushing to see how we can save them a little bit more time. Give them peace of mind. One of the things that you've talked a lot about is in your words, the immense responsibility that you think Google has to make the world a better place. And I wonder in this moment as we sit here, what do you think the number one thing is that Google needs to do to actually achieve that And to fulfill what you call this immense responsibility means a few things. Um, you know, we are one of the leading companies in a I. So we committed to driving a I development responsibly in a way that benefits society. That's a big sense of responsibility. We feel we feel that on the content on our platforms, you know, one off the thanks we have all grappled with over the past few years is to making sure that the content we have on our platforms is safe and benefits people. And so that's something we feel a sense of responsibility protecting user data, the scale at which we operate. We want to keep our user data private, secure and give them the choice and comfort they need around it. What is the Google moon shot that you think right now has the biggest shot at changing humanity? We were working on something called quantum computing Onda. It is effectively the next stage of computing way. All think off is a moon shot, which will help not just artificial intelligence, but solve many new problems in the world. So it's an example of the kind of Moonshot we get excited about. Did you want to be CEO of Google? Like really? Did you want the job? Did you lobby for the job? Because I remember when you were picked and many people were surprised. Many Googlers were happily surprised who had worked with you. But you didn't. You don't strike me as someone who raised their hand and lobbied for for the top job. I mean, I really it's an opportunity of a lifetime. I just wanted to build products for me. I get my satisfaction from bringing day to day products which millions of people use. And that's what I was doing. And through the course of that, you know, one day when Larry and Sergey asked me to do this, you know, I felt it was a privilege, but were you surprised? Yes, a little bit. You know, I was busy building products and I quite didn't anticipate where this would go on. You'd never asked for it. No. A lot of people dio you know. So let's talk about you before Google and who you are fundamentally and how how you got here. You grew up in Chennai, India. What was life like growing up as a child? You know, there was a simplicity to it, uh, greatly enjoyed it in some ways. When I was growing up, there were no computers, no television, no Internet. And so it was mainly friends and playing sports and reading books. And s o. You know, that simplicity is still there with me today. We grew up modestly, but through discrete moments we got access to something new in our life. So we waited for a telephone for about five years and we had to apply and wait for it. Before that, there was only one street in the, you know, in the entire street. There was one of the home which had a telephone, so sometimes he would go there to make a call. And for me, once we got the telephone, others would come to our house. It was kind of open door thing, became a communal thing. People would come to call their kids. And so for me showed the power of what's possible with technology. Do you remember the first time you touched a computer? You know, when I was in college and, you know, I had to at Stanford is the first time you touched a computer in India. When I went to college, I had access to it a very few times. But when I came to Stanford, there was a time I could actually, you know, had kind of a dedicated computer. And so it was a big moment in my life. There was a drought in India when you were growing up, and it that experience still affect you today growing up in Chennai, Uh, there was a severe water scarcity going up, and so they would literally truck water in and we would collect a few couple of gallons of water per day and we would stand in lines, get water. There was no running water, and that's how you know we used it. But, you know, But I still had a very positive life. And, you know, I grew up in a culture where people valued learning and there was a sense of community around it. So I felt like I had everything I needed
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