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Introduction to the podcast series "Down to Sally's Cove"

From Audio: A cat video, a nap, and a trip to Sally's Cove.

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This excerpt from a CBC interview tells a little about Ella Manuel and her Newfoundland stories, the basis of this podcast series
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This excerpt from a CBC interview tells a little about Ella Manuel and her Newfoundland stories, the basis of this podcast series
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Hello, Antony. Good morning, Heather. Well, tell me a bit about your mother. L Emmanuel. Who was she? Well, she was born and brought up in Lewis Port, where her father ran the main hotel Emmanuel Hotel in Lewis Port. Long gone, Uh, she studied, uh, went to university in Boston and graduated during the Depression, went to England, married, came back, spent the war years in the United States and returned to Newfoundland a few years before Confederation on spent the rest of her life in Newfoundland first running, doing a Z, a journalist with the Western star and then increasingly reading her stories on journalists journalism on CBC radio. So for a young woman from rural Newfoundland in the earlier part of the 20th century, she was certainly well traveled and well educated. She certainly waas particularly her years in the thirties in England when she traveled throughout throughout Europe and indeed, at one point into into Russia on she worked with with Marks and Spencer as a as a social worker, improving conditions for the shop girls and marks and Spencers many stores throughout England. So she had a broad experience by the time she came back toe Newfoundland. So that sort of brings us up to the subject matter in the podcast that you're talking about. Because I understand which came back to Newfoundland in 1945. She was a single mother with two small boys. And what was her intention coming back to Newfoundland? I think her intention really was to do whatever she could to help to develop Newfoundland. She sensed that it wouldn't be long before Newfoundland joined Canada. And I think that she wanted to in addition to finding a career for herself, because by this time her marriage had dissolved and she so she was very interested in work of finding some way in which she could use her talents, writing and speaking, uh, in the in the interests of of Newfoundland that she moved quickly out of out of eastern Newfoundland, although always retained her background in Notre Dame Bay on Bond fell in love with Bombay and the areas around Bombay and Corner Brook and tell me what she did. I understand she was sort of a very early adapter to the tourism industry. She was indeed, in 1946 she rented an abandoned building in the log busy logging town of Lomond in the main arm of Bombay on renamed It Kill Devil Lodge and rounded as a sports fishing venture. So she catered to people who came to flat fish for salmon and trout on the Loman River and the Upper Humber River and to cruise around Bombay as well. Part of this was in association with with Lee Wolf, who was at the same time developing fishing camps further north in on the West Coast. But the venture didn't last very long. It was far too early to have Ah tourist fly fishing establishment. The roads was terrible. The Newfoundland government was really not interested in supporting or promoting tourism beyond the East Coast in Newfoundland. So after a few years, the venture sort of fizzled out, and eventually she sold the, um lodge to the Anglican Church. And of course, they run that ever since 50 years later, I think, uh, the Anglican Church has been running kill level lodges as a conference center and a place for people to meet during the summer. Okay, so now you were one of those small boys like, what do you remember about that life growing up. Oh, I remember lots of things about the summers in Loman in the midst and late forties. I was the older of the two boys, Uh, but my younger brother John and I played with the boys in the village. Uh, especially we've played down around the Barris Wa the Loman River, and we'd go out when our boat jig and walk along the beaches and look for minerals. Onda occasionally swipe turnips from somebody's garden when they weren't looking. So So why did you think now was the time to put together a podcast and a book about your mother? Well, I've been working on trying to figure out what to do with all of the the manuscript that my mother left behind when she died of over 30 years ago. And it's taken me quite a while toe, um, to find the proper way to do this. Meanwhile, court podcasting is developed and now very popular way of communicating with people. And so it was suggested after, um, a while that I read a few of her stories which I edited and changed around quite a bit on the Voice of Bombay, the community radio in Bombay and I did that and got enough encouragement. So well, I'll do some more of these stories and maybe put it out as a podcast. And that's exactly what what I've done. And in fact, I'm still I'm very much in the process of adding more episodes and they all together they'll probably be about 40 different episodes on this podcast, Siri's and the last, probably most of the rest of this year. They're not all on the West Coast. She talks also about rights. Also, about some of the wonderful people who came to Newfoundland in the 18 hundreds. Andi worked in rural Newfoundland, So she talks about people in the car droid Valley and Fortune Bay up in Bona Vista Bay and, of course, uh uh, in Notre Dame Bay, where she grew out. Where did she put all this? Writing This'll is another part of her life, isn't it? To their writing and the telling of the stories. Many of them actually started out as broadcast freelance broadcast on the CBC. Some of them went right across Canada on Trans Canada, uh, somewhere broadcast in Australia, and I think one in England. But for the most part, she did not have a good experience. She had difficulty in putting these stories, uh, together. But she did write one very, uh, well known in lovely book of a novel about ah, little girl growing up in note in Notre Dame Bay called that fine summer, which is still in print with breakwater books. Mm. I mean, it strikes me that in all the stories that you tell about your mother and the things that she did during her lifetime, that she was very much ahead of her time. She certainly was. She was became long before the term was popular, and she became a feminist after all. She came back to Newfoundland in 1946. Ah, divorced, single, single mother trying and working with her maiden name. So that itself was a bit of a scandal in corner Brook Corner Brook at that time was not terribly sophisticated. So she had a tough time particularly, um, in making a way for herself a za woman on. That's why the book that is shortly to be published by Breakwater is entitled No place for a woman and tell me about some of her other legacy to like she she actually had, uh, some long term influences on legislation, didn't she? Uh, not too sure about that. But she certainly she she was very politically active in the seventies through the voice of women, which is a national peace group of women as it's still in existence. She was the national vice president for a while. She was, um, one of the I think the Onley individual to submit a submission to the raw commission on women in the late seventies early eighties just for gotten the date now and, uh, on the basis of that, she was awarded the person's medal in 1983. I think it waas by the governor General. And I recognized her contribution to, um promoting the cause on the strengthening the role of women in rural Newfoundland and Labrador. So she certainly was active. Then she was involved in Memorial University on the on the Board of Regions, a two grand for college and then at Memorial in ST John's on. But she was a strong supporter of the, uh of the NDP party when it was formed. Well, what do you hope people take away from your podcast and hearing you read some of your mother's writings. Well, I hope that despite the fact that that I'm a no older man reading the stories of of, ah, a younger woman on there much of those air in her, um, in her voice in terms of the words used, um, I've hoped that and I think that people will enjoy a return. Thio Somewhat gentler time in Newfoundland and the rural areas. Those people in the West Coast and other parts of Newfoundland will recognize some of the people that she is talking about, although they are often not named. But they're anonymous or they have a pseudonym. I think they will recognize that on bond sample something off the values of the culture of Newfoundland. It at mid century, particularly the rural park. So what are the details and how can people find your podcast and the upcoming book? Well, the podcast is available now on Spotify and Apple iTunes uh, it's put out on a podcasting service called Buzz Sprout. Strange name be used as a Strout buzz sprout dot com, and if you look for down to Sally's Cove, that's the name of the podcast down to Sally's Cove on Buzz Sprout or on Spotify
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