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Interview with Larry King on UF16 Podcast

From Audio: UF16: Joe Rogan and Larry King

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UFC Unfiltered with Jim Norton and Matt Serra
Duration: 19:12
Larry calls in from LA talking about his 600th episode of Larry King Live.
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Larry calls in from LA talking about his 600th episode of Larry King Live.
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Hi, Jim. How are you, buddy? Okay, I'm ready. Ok, good. We're on the air. Where are you right now? In my home? Oh, you're in l A. Yep. Okay on. And you're enjoying. You just celebrated. Just 6/100 episode of Larry King. Now, on the July the 25th. Uh, congratulations. Thank you. Yeah. Keeps on. I thought I could retire, Jim, after all those years, I missed it too much. Then I was able to put together this wonderful Internet network with Carlos Slim is a partner, and my wife conceived the idea. Now, with in our fifth year, it's really worked. Great. Look, kind of a pioneer, you know, with cable and CNN and Internet. National radio is the first national radio talk show host. Was have been 60 years in the business. It's kind of incredible. How long were you all for Larry? Before you decided to do this? Or before You said, Look, I can not meant to retire. How long did you it was a break. Did you have all I was off for? About I was all for about six months. Seven months, and And the thing that kept me back was the night Osama bin Laden was killed. I was home watching television, enjoying my kids. And when that happened, I wanted to get up and run somewhere in broadcast and there was no way to go. And Carlos Slim had mentioned to me that we'd like to get something started. So I jumped at the opportunity and glad I did. I'm not a person who couldn't retire. So now I'm doing more than I ever did. I do this. I do a politicking twice a week. I do Larry King now three times a week. I do, Ah, podcast with my wife. Wow, Do you now? Do you like doing a podcast with your wife? Do you like it? Or did she make you? That's a lot of ways. All you do enjoy that we do. OK, it's hysterical. That's very funny. It's just a lot of less not unplanned. We just sit and wing it, and a lot of people don't realize that you were a radio host for so long because so many people just know you from from from television. But you How many years did you actually host a radio show? Oh, I started in 1957 and retired and from radio in 97. So I was 40 years on the radio. And you remember when the first national talk show you did? Yep. Mutual Radio Network in 1978. And you Who is your first? I'm sure it was back in the fifties who was your first really big guest that you had to sit down with and talk to for a while. Bobby Darn. A great singer and a marvelous talent. He was working at the hotel in Miami Beach, and I was doing the morning show of the restaurant. He just popped in. And hey, had been listening. He was an early riser, and he'd been listening. And then others started to come in. Danny Thomas, Jimmy Hoffa. You interviewed Jimmy Hoffa three times. Yeah. And Jackie Robinson three times. What would guys like Jimmy Hoffa talk about? What was he talking about? The union or what? What What was so talked about? Everything we talked about. What was it like? Thio Grow up. You know, he never drove a truck. He was a handler on the Heywood load trucks in Detroit. Hey, had an incredible memory. Jimmy Hoffa was into a very interesting guy, He called. He referred to himself by his own name. He was said, Hoffa says, Oh, really get him before I had to get him before he went to prison and when he got out of prison. But he was a tough hey was not in it for the money. He was in it for power and given all his faults, he loved his union members. He, uh, he took care of member I interviewed the team's towards, He said. Listen, if I was supposed to be making I was making a dollar an hour when he took over making $4 an hour. If it's supposed to be four and a quarter and Jimmy's to keep in the quarter with him, give me $5 an hour. He could keep half a dollar. They just just worshiped him. They loved what he did because I was looked at people from both sides. I try to walk in other people's shoes, which made me a good interview because I try to understand the wise of people. Why do people do what they do? Evil people don't wake up in the morning and think they're evil when they comb their hair. They don't say to myself, I am a bad person. They rationalize everything they do. So you've gotta try to come in from their perspective. When you interviewed Jackie Robinson, I didn't realize you talked to him to what was his perspective on what was happening in baseball and how he was. It's funny. They just put one of his hats up for auction, which was a hat that had a certain lining in it. So because he was always getting pelted with things, it was different than the other major leaguers. Hats. Jackie was an extraordinary guy. First as a child, I was at his first game. I was 13 years old, Brooklyn, and I sat up in the bleaches and got to interview him twice. Later in life, he was He was not the Jackie of the first two years. The Jackie the first two years had to be calm, couldn't get excited, couldn't get angry. But the Jackie after that was incredible. Um, he was a tough leader. He was, uh, a bench jockey. He he would, uh he would slide into his own mother. He was a vicious ballplayer. He was like Bob Gibson was as a pitcher. He was as, ah, as an infielder. He was, uh, there's nothing like him, Remember? He said to me, Don't put me in my grave with promises. Don't tell me my son will have a fair shot at life. You give it to me now I don't need promises. So he was a much more definitively angry or stronger guy than than he was allowed to show angry. He was an angry, intelligent vocal leader who would have been a major major force. In fact, when I interviewed Martin Luther King, I, uh, said that I introduced him. Is the founder of the civil rights movement. He said No. Jackie Robinson is the founder of the civil rights movement. When did you ever interview Malcolm X Major major for Did you ever interview Malcolm X Oh, twice. Malcolm X was another extraordinary, no extraordinary thing. He was so bright and so forceful, and we had that striking, looking at the red hair, and I like Malcolm X a lot. And of course he changed quite a bit. I interviewed them when he was more angry, and then when he went over African, came back and was Mawr understanding of whites and blacks? And, of course, the tragedy. A fence assassination, which. Yeah, well, you know, when you've interviewed 60,000 people and doing something for almost 60 years just by us Moses, you run into all these people. But you're so interesting, though, because it's rare that I get to talk to somebody who really has such a firsthand experience with American history in the last 60 years by talking to these guys. And when you interviewed Martin Luther King Jr. Then you interview Malcolm X. What was the difference between these guys in person or when you were in the room talking to them? Martin Luther King Jr was very much a believer, was very much a religious person. Um, Malcolm X was not a religious person. Uh, you understand very much. Malcolm X, Malcolm X said to me, Malcolm was not a religious person. Religion Well, in his own, Really. I wouldn't call him this well and well, he certainly wasn't Christian, but he was, uh he was more Malcolm X would have fought back. Martin Luther King wouldn't have fought back Malcolm X if you hit him, he would not turn the other cheek. King Jr would turn the other cheek, but Malcolm X said to me, Imagine what it's like to be a Negro kid and never see yourself. You know, you're never in commercials, you're never on television, you know, there's no black Santa Claus. That's what that's like. And it got me to think and imagine what it's like. And he made me really thinking I was always a liberal. But he made me think beyond that of what it's like to be a Negro in America in the 19 sixties to grow up with no role models visible on It's a lot of a lot of gay people say the same thing. They said. We don't see any role models, people representing who we are on television, you know, that's changing fact. That's changing faster than the black movement change, which is the most amazing thing to me is how quick changes are have occurred. Who would have said 10 years ago that gay marriage would be accepted? Why do you think is changing faster now than it did because the Children are moving it along? The young people saw the hypocrisy of the older people are ridiculous. We were to judge people by their sexual orientation of the color of their skin. They can't tell what it was. That a joke. They don't understand it so that they move it faster. And that's what for a lot of politicians don't see this movement is moving faster than the politicians see it you've interviewed. They missed it. It's funny you talking about interviewing Malcolm X before I just before and after he went to Mecca. Did you? You've interviewed Ali, I'm sure. Did you talk to him when he was younger with With Elijah Mohammed? And then later on in years. How many times do you talk to him? 100. You did? Yeah. I interviewed him when he first won the Olympics. When he was Cassius Clay. I was with him the day of the way in with Sonny Liston. He trained in Miami Beach, and that's where my career started. Ali was was just one of the greatest people I've ever known. He was a wonderful man. Caring, funny, a true world figure. Uh, Ali knew his. I took my son Andy. The Vegas with him when he fought quarry on was like 78 Yeah, In the middle of the fifth round, he was in a clinch and he leaned over and my son was in the third role and he yelled, Is this a way to make a living? Jesus was Ali And just, you know, we're talking obviously Larry King. And just to let people I want to reiterate where they can see, uh, Larry Show and where can they find it? It's on or a dot TV slash Larry King now and also on hula dot com. Congratulations. And when you have a dot com when the episodes Artie Artie, Cable network. Okay, And when do episodes come out? New episodes come out every day and I think two o'clock And then, of course, there, there in perpetuity. And it's we're seeing on politicking twice a week and Larry King now three times a week. So he's busy. Election night. I'll be doing a special for our tea, which is seen all over the world. So we're seeing all over the world. It z been a hell of a career. I'll tell you, you you one of my favorite people to talk Thio because you just you know everybody who I want to know. We really, really wanted. You know, you've interviewed the president. You've interviewed the senators and congressmen as far as the president of concerned or people in power. Who is somebody you spoke to? And I'm sure there was more than one. Who is somebody who spoke to who has influence, who you felt This person is lying to me right now. Oh, a few people. You try to win away from what you try to get to the truth. If someone's deep into a lie and you don't have proof, then it's just a feeling. So sometimes a lot of politicians you feel us skirting the truth or lying to you. Do your best you can. If you've got the goods, you go to the goods. If you don't have the goods, you could presume it. And then I always let the audience make up its mind. I try to ask the best questions. Listen, the most important thing is listening. Follow up with good questions and, uh, and I'll let the chips fall where they may, Um on the audience could make up their mind. I never interjected myself. I never used the word I when I was interviewing something. I thought somebody I thought I was irrelevant. Uh, I was the conduit with the guests went through me to the audience. When you look at something like, uh, Frost Nixon and that amazing four day interview he did with Richard Nixon, he finally got him to admit what he wanted him to on the fourth day. Do you go into interviews like that where you're like this? This is the point I want to get to with this person in an hour, not four days. And then you disappoint. You would never had. I love David Frost. He was a great friend that I knew Nixon. I have never had an agenda. I never went on the air saying, I'm going to get this guy and not get this guy. I do the best I can tow, learn everything I can without an agenda. I was not there to embarrass. I was not there to extol. Not that of praise. I was not there to demean. I was there to learn. My object is an interview. Was, uh, no more than I did before. And to bring that exchange of information to the listening or viewing audience. Do you think that's why they trusted you so much when it was a politician or an actor or just a pop culture figure? Absolutely. I'd love to be called back to moderate one of these debates. Uh, you were just That was right. I was right up my alley. And I know both Trump and Hillary for 30 years each, so I'd be very fair. I'm always there and, Well, what do you think about the climate? I mean, it's a bizarre. It's a bizarre event. Every day, something new is popping up. If it's not him saying something stupid, it's her stupid emails. I mean, have you ever seen anything like this in politics? Uh, never. I've never seen anything like a bit just, uh, but she is the most. As Obama said, she's most qualified person having to run for president. No one ever had it. A dossier like hers. I mean, she's she's incredible woman, and he's an incredible guy in his own 40. He's got a little berserk. Uh, say the least. I don't know where he's coming from. If you let him loose, you know Donald Donald, not a bad guy. He's not a racist, but something's happened to him, and I don't know what it is. It's Messianic. It's, uh, if I were Hillary, I wouldn't even campaign. What's an interesting thing you just said about her being the most qualified? You know, I'm to be honest, I'm up in the air. But who gonna vote for? But when? What is this visceral reaction against her? People have, like people who you have. Have you noticed it? She's one, of course, but she's one of the finest, the funniest down to earth women, Certainly one of the brightest people I've ever known. And, uh, she was a hell of a senator. People forget that she's a very good secretary of state. The email thing. I don't understand why she did that. It makes no sense to me why she said, Hey, we all do stupid things in life. Yeah, I was a stupid thing. Uh, but she's Ah, if you had a resume, if you were applying for the job, I don't trust it. Like a joke. Yeah, I guess you're right. I mean, hey, off the subject to with with With politics. Do you ever interview John F. Kennedy? I bumped into his car once. Did you really? In Palm Beach, Florida? Yeah, I hit him. Bumped into him on a sunny, beautiful Sunday morning. They were walking when you're driving you JFK. I was driving and he was driving, and we were the only two cars on the road. I was looking up, but then he does a kid and he came out. I said, Do you want to change licenses? He says, no. But I'm gonna run for president in two years. And I want all four your vegetable to me. Swear you'll vote way. Swore we'd vote from, By the way, I've interviewed something. You know, I've interviewed You have two female stars of your sport. Oh, you've interviewed Rhonda. And who was the other Holly girl will be there. Holly Holm, End of interview. It's a man, and it's a wild sports. Your sports, it really is. I mean, it's getting It's probably what to get bought for four billion $4 billion. Yeah, I got a big percentage that they offered me 10% to host the podcast. That was a nice deal. Worked out well for me. 400 million. Yeah, well, And what did you think Iran do when you interviewed her? The I like them both a lot. Like I liked. I liked him. I think they were really with it. Uh, they were courageous. They were honest And the sport itself, Larry, because you you talked to so many boxers. Um, did you see any difference between the fighters in the UFC you've talked to and the boxers the mentality that goes into that? Did you see any difference, or did they just remind you of each other? It reminded me a little of each other. Although the UFC people, they they like paying more. You know, you think boxers like pain. But as Ali told me many times, I want to get hurt. Yeah, he want to avoid getting him to kill me. Uh, but the U. S have been some of the UFC has been very honest, you know, like, how would they do against a boxer? Rhonda Rousey said she would have had a tough time in Mayweather. Not if she could take him down. She wouldn't have if they had to stand up in box. You gotta find him first. That's a good point. Yeah, he's a very slippery man. But if she was allowed to grab him around the waist, I'd take She's never never been hit by a professional boxer. She's hit by other UFC people, but professional boxers are lethal weapons. If a boxer hits you, they go to jail. Um, yeah, we've never We've never tested, but Mm a Hey, you can't deny its popularity. Well, was tested once. Randy couture for James Toney. And, uh, auteur. I think Tony was actually a couple of years younger than couture and co tour. Really? You know, he took him down. I think it was a single leg takedown. And and he killed him. I I think that that the element of being able to kick and being able to grab is what makes the UFC fighters so much more dangerous. Street fighting. Yeah. I mean with rules. But, you know, anyone facing Floyd Mayweather on a stand up, just boxing matches in deep trouble. But you know, Floyd Mayweather get you better run. Although, you know what? Larry Taison. You know, Tyson doesn't seem to have a lot of respect for guys like Floyd Mayweather. He thinks he's a scared person. Um, he hasn't lost. No, he has it. But then again, neither did Julio Cesar Chavez for, like, 80 something fights. I think he's pretty underrated when you look back on his career on Tyson may have been overrated. That love Mike, Mike was a street fighter club fighter. Do you think he was overrated or just defensive? He just fought the guys that put in front of him. Good. Good club fighter who was not a good defensive fighting. I don't know. I thought he had very good movements. What's that, Jim? I gotta run. Oh, no. I was just about to argue about Mike Tyson. Larry, I love you. I really gotta go toe work. We could do it again. The scheduled. I would like that a lot. I think you're awesome. And I think you're a great broadcaster. Larry King. Now it's on Aura TV. What's that? I said thank you. I gotta run. Okay, Larry shutting me up in the middle. The plug. All right. Thank you for calling it. All right, buddy, I've never actually had somebody scold me in the middle. The plug was I gotta go, but maybe yes, the tape. How long was he on for maybe 15 minutes. I always want to talk in person. You see, there's always little disconnect. I do like him, though, but I disagree that Tyson was already because Tyson did fight. You know, he didn't fight Ernie Shavers, but he fucking murdered these guys. Yeah, well, that's look, you can't mess with his style. At a certain point. It's like that. You put that guy in the ring, he's gonna go after you, and then that's what he's looking for, the knockout. So and I don't disagree that I disagree. That Tyson was was a bad defensive. He wasn't defensive. I think he's a very underrated boxer. He was a great power punch.
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