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Snippet of Throttled Motorcycle Podcaast: Motorcycle Braking Tips

From Audio: Episode 114 : Motorcycle Braking Tips

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station description Semi true stories of the motorcycling world
Throttled Motorcycle Podcast
Duration: 11:34
Coming to a safe stop is one of the most fundamental parts of learning how to ride a motorcycle--and also the easiest to take for granted. Mastering motorcycle braking is very different than doing the same in a car. In this snippet, our guest outlines 13 tips to improve your braking technique.
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Coming to a safe stop is one of the most fundamental parts of learning how to ride a motorcycle--and also the easiest to take for granted. Mastering motorcycle braking is very different than doing the same in a car. In this snippet, our guest outlines 13 tips to improve your braking technique.

"Semi-true stories about motorcycles and misadventures," the Throttled podcast offers up-to-date news and perspectives from dedicated riders.
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have some useful tips for people. At least it did for May. Um, this was from Cycle World. I don't know how to pronounce the guy's name. Nick. Yeah, Nash, I think, um, I'll be able to skip this ad in five seconds so soon as I could do that. We're on our way. I'll start with this. So what he does is hey, list out, um, some some things to kind of help you, um, with with with breaking and controlling the motorcycle during this. Um, yeah, I I think he's sort of recommending kind of. I first I thought it was gonna be sort of a tutorial, which would actually give you, uh, practice exercises to Dio. And it's a little like that, but it's more like pointers or ah, things to think about when you are break and practicing your breaking. And I still thought that there were some interesting points that I didn't necessarily know or think about the top of my head. So his first point is fine. You know, find a place with dry pavement. Obviously, that doesn't have traffic on it. And most people tend to use large parking lots to practice on and that's probably good place to start. Um, and the first step, he says number one is to practice rolling off the throttle while transitioning to the brake lever and brake pedal and making sure that the throttle shut off. Uh, you know, as you when you do this, make sure that if your throttle is hanging up, he says, lower your elbow. So as as you put your hand on the throttle, uh, to enable you to close the throttle completely. So the idea is that you don't want to close the throttle and reach for the break. You want the fingers sort of to naturally rotate onto the brake lever as the throttle shuts if you want. If you're using a long wheelbase motorcycle, generally I think this translates to a cruiser or a bagger. Uh, you'll be using quite a bit of rear brake if you're on a superbike or sport bike. The rear brake will probably not be that effective during a hard stop, because the retire is got very little weight on it or is in the air. So you know you have to use the pointers here, too, as a guide, but not as the absolute rule, you have to sort of feel your own way. But depending on your bike, um, the second point he makes is that the palms of your hands and your arms take the load under braking. But, ah, that you should not lock your elbows because, uh, that could tie your bikes, steering head to the chassis and creating stability. So the idea is to keep your elbows bent so that there's some flexibility. Your your arms can absorb some of the, um, shock of breaking. Uh, if you're using hey recommends using 12 or three fingers on the brake lever, but you wanna usually have one finger around the throttle drum. Uh, Thio help rev match during downshifts. But he says, it points out that in an emergency situation, you're not gonna be that concerned about, uh, about rev matching this. The third point is one that I thought I found very seemed to be very important, and something that I don't think about normally. And that is that the initial squeeze of the brake lever, uh, isn't actually for slowing its for loading the fork springs in a linear manner and getting the tire compressed against the pavement on DSO. His point is that you shouldn't be grabbing the brake lever, you know, with a great deal of force. And, uh, because if you if you do that too quickly, you will not give your bike time to your shock. Time to compress and your tire Time to start to flatten on the pavement and give you the traction that you that you need. So this is he's, as he calls it, a huge deal. Ah, you ah, you need to, he said. If you just grab your brake lever, you'll be another rider who crashes before they even get to the emergency. At the school that that he worked has worked at, he tells students there is no emergency worth crashing for. So the the idea again is, uh, to take up, too, they say, up to a second to compress the shocks and flatten the front wheel before you actually proceed to tighten your grip on the brake lever. And if you do that, you're going to get ah, lot more traction and a lot less, uh, bike movement throwing you forward, which can upset to the your equal equilibrium and the braking ability of the bike. That seems to be a very important point in something that I'm going to try to work on. Uh, and his number four point is that if your bike has a B s antilock brakes on the and the the antilock brake system activates immediately, you're grabbing far too hard and too quickly what you want. What you should shoot for is getting the A BS, if necessary to activate later in the braking zone. Because at that point you've gotten to the limit of the traction of the tire and the A BS can then help stop the tire from losing traction. So the the point number five is that you need to focus your mind on two things pressure that you're putting on the brake lever and the amount of communication that your front tire is giving you. And his point about that is, is that if you're breaking properly, you will hear some noises coming from the front tire that are telling you exactly how much how close the front tire is, toe losing its grip, and you can adjust your braking force accordingly. Uh, his point number six is that rioters break so poorly because they're afraid of locking the tires and falling down. It's very important that you do that. Initial squeeze for rate transfer, entire loading for weight transfer, entire loading, uh, in order to, uh, minimize the possibility of walking the tires. And it also helps you to sort of give yourself a little bit more time to focus on your grip and finger pressure Point number seven is start slow and easy, he suggests, as I mentioned making the initial squeeze last for up to a whole second and then gently build pressure and come to a stop point. Number eight is sort of at the other end that at the end of your breaking, do your best to control the weight, the rate of which your fork rebounds. If your bike stops completely in the four rebounds aggressively, that means that you're too late releasing brake pressure. Ah, if if it rebounds aggressively and your bike continues to roll your to earlier releasing the great brake pressure, Uh, this may not affect your braking distance, but it does help uh, you to practice the proper amount of pressure for your breaking eso, and it could also help you in trail braking and other other, uh, breaking practices. Aside from emergency braking, I've found sort of similar in a car. If you have to break strongly and you don't sort of let up on the brake pressure at the end of your stop, then the car jerks uncomfortably. But if you let up on the brake pressure, the car sort of levels gradually. And people hardly noticed that you've, uh you know that you break strongly. Point number nine is also an important point, I think, and that is that you need to practice breaking at this, you know, at the same speed that you normally right at and that you therefore need to build up your speed gradually as you practice. If you normally ride at 100 miles an hour, then you better be practiced. That's stopping from 100 miles an hour. Ah, and but you have to build up to this. You should not start off or very early on practice emergency stops from high speeds. But the other part of it is that people who have tried stopping from 100 miles an hour very quickly realize how long it takes to stop and he has found that when people do, uh, try this out and see what it takes, uh, they end up driving more slowly, generally, because they know they realize how long it's gonna take them to stop. So, um, let's say the point. Number 12, the point number 11 is sort of repetition of the other points on. And he point number 12 is that if you have a writer or if you're a writer, that is, doesn't accelerator carry speed anywhere? The problem with that writer probably is not that they have a throttle problem, but rather that they are. They have a braking problem. They're insecure or, uh, lack confidence about their ability to stop or slow down after the acceleration. So, uh, that goes back to the other point that you need to practice breaking from the speeds that you normally right at and the 13th point, and this is also I thought, an important one is that you need Thio think about and try to fight against the reaction of slamming on the brakes when you're surprised or startled. Eso this. This is a reaction that begins when you see something, uh, in the corner of your eyes that that seems to be, uh, entering into your you know, your field of view. And if it startles you, your first reaction may be to slam on the brakes. And his point is that you need to train your right hand and foot to not slam, grab or stab on the brakes when you're startled. Hey, even says that you can practice this in a car. Uh, which they call vehicles they call cars. Four wheel practice motorcycle vehicles. Mhm. So, uh, this is something that may be as much a physical and mental exercises, a physical one. But you need to think constantly about training yourself to not panic when something surprises you. Yeah, I usually think about this a little bit differently. Um, you know, I was kind of when I got back into right and kind of went through
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