Group 4 Created with Sketch.
Your changes have been saved
Episode 96 of 133

Entrepreneur John Philpin on Why People Should Come First: The ROI Online Podcast Ep. 96

Share
station description Steve Brown believes you, the entrepreneur, are the invisible hero of today’s econo... read more
The ROI Online Podcast
42 Listens
1 Like
Duration: 37:51
Were you one of the companies metaphorically slapped in the face by 2020? In this episode of the ROI Online Podcast, entrepreneur John Philpin shares what you can do about it now!
Snippets are a new way to share audio!
You can clip a small part of any file to share, add to playlist, and transcribe automatically. Just click the to create your snippet!
Snippets: Clips of Entrepreneur John Philpin on Why People Should Come First: The ROI Online Podcast Ep. 96 that people like
Playlists that Entrepreneur John Philpin on Why People Should Come First: The ROI Online Podcast Ep. 96 appears on.
Up Next
Full Description
Back to Top
Were you one of the companies metaphorically slapped in the face by 2020? In this episode of the ROI Online Podcast, entrepreneur John Philpin talks about unlocking human potential and how embracing the future of work can benefit your business and prepare you for unexpected situations. John is a marketing consultant, entrepreneur, and author. He’s the founder of People First, where they help organizations struggling to deliver on their mission. They believe by unlocking human potential, you can accomplish greater things. Every organization is made up of people; they’re the ones who make it work. When your people are happy, the whole corporation works better. Find out what a difference it really makes for your business to prioritize the humans that work in it. Among other things, John and Steve discussed: how People First started The fact that we’re all users, leads, consumers, or customers what John’s new book is all about how to face this world’s inevitable changes come out on top by putting people first Joan's different platforms and how can he help your business thriveHumanizing the way we work and grow the value of our business the future of work you can learn more about John here: follow John on LinkedIn you can learn more about People First here:https://peoplefirst.vision/Follow them on LinkedInRead the books mentioned in this podcast: The Golden Toilet by Steve BrownFor Business Leaders Slapped in the Face by a World They Thought They Knew by John PhilpinThinking of starting your own podcast? Buzzsprout’s secure and reliable posting allows you to publish podcasts online. Buzzsprout also includes full iTunes support, HTML5 players, show statistics, and WordPress plugins. Get started using this link to receive a $20 Amazon gift card and to help support our show! Support the show (https://cash.app/$stevemfbrown)
Snippet Transcripts
So let's talk about some of the other pillars. What's, um was, like the main pillar. That really motivated you to write the book first. Set the story up on what finally convicted you. Oh, I just got to write a book. Well, I've been right. Wanted to write a book since I was about eight. As far as I can work out, I remember the conversation with my mother very well. I just never sure what the book was going to be. Right That I have in my head is still not this book, but this particular book came from this. You know, we always talk about change, and change is always happening. But what happened in the in 2020 was such a vast global hit you in the face what you're going to do kind of change. They just said, Okay, this is a message. This is what I've got to get out because change management is what I've done, right? It's a sales and marketing, but essentially, I translate what what part side is saying to what the other side is saying and explain how things are going to change to make that work to the better. It might be talking between the sales and marketing team, explaining to sales what marketing does and vice versa. But it's all it's essentially, it's change. So that's what prompted me to write the book, um, around this, but it's it's not really the whole people first cannon, the people first whole idea. I've always been interested in the future of work, but the original thing that started taking me into this was actually identity. And this idea again, coming out of the software world I d is what everybody talks about. How do you How do you prove who you are? How do you what credentials do you use to log in all this kind of stuff? The word back to language identity is two parts. I'd and entity the entity of who you are. Your ego, your yourself, your your inner voice, everything that makes you you is your entity. ID is not your identity and and this has been something I banged on for a long time. Burnout. But that's what got me into this thinking. How do we break this strangle hold of the tech industry talking about idea of users, right? It's like no what's their identity? How do we bring this? And there's some very interesting and clever work going and at a deep technical level where people are trying to reconcile what how this problem works and how you do it. How do you bring identity in a human way into technology? And another part of this that makes it very interesting is that you know, on the fringe side of what I do, I look a lot at the the underprivileged, unrecognized people of the world. People is a sex trafficked people, people that have, um, you know, some refugees trying to get out of place. They have no papers, they have no ID. But they do have an entity. They are people. So there's a work again going on. How do you How do you bank people that can't prove who they are? And if you can't bank people, where do they put their money? Oh, it's in cash. Oh, they get robbed. It's something about that. That kid needs to sparkle again. Lots of very bright and intelligent people doing work around this. That sort of says no. We now have to work. If you go for a cashless society. Everybody has to be banked. By the way. Why is the bank allowed to hold your identity? Why am I not allowed to hold my identity, My identity? Mind I should let you know who I am through an independent validation that I am who I am. And I can afford to do this. What? No, no single institution should be allowed to. That's what drove this origi. That's where the identity came from. One of my recent stuff comes around work and the future of work, because I see some of the rubbish being spoken about it. I actually talk about the future of income, and it's a much more interesting conversation to my mind, who really wants to work, like who wants to get up and empty garbage cans or get up at three o'clock in the morning to clean offices or to bake bread so that somebody can eat it or to drive a taxi or whatever? There are definitely some people that enjoy that, but most people work to get money so they can afford to live. Now, if I can give you a different way of making money that wasn't called work and you just concentrate on the future of income. Is that a little bit more interesting? Now, when I talk about income I'm not talking about you be at universal basic income, not government handouts I'm talking about when you look at a very rich person, they're not paid by the hour. They are paid by utilizing their assets. Let's be those His work The Billions years has some very expensive asses that he can control of, but we've all got assets. Why can't we monetize that? I own a big, expensive lawnmower? Why can't I monetize that in a way that you can be loaned out people and pay to offset that cost? Why can't I buy a self driving car and send that out and being a taxi for me? I don't have to work here. It'll just round. That whole idea is what I think is a much more interesting conversation because really, at the end of the day, most jobs are going to be automated out, and the answer is not to be a caregiver. Plenty of caregivers if we actually rewarded caregivers in the way that they should be. If we actually rewarded teachers in the way that they should be, then there'd be a lot more interested in going there, but we don't. So that's not a future work. If you've just lost your $200,000 job running in some bank as a middle manager somewhere because they're flattening the organization. Good idea for the corporation. That middle manager can't earn that money elsewhere as a caregiver or a teacher or whatever else it might be.
you know, we're having this conversation and I would love to kind of like think of all the vocabulary words that dehumanize the other side. Okay, so I would, you know, my So you said users. You said consumers, clients, prospects. But another one is like leads I got Hey, I got a lead, right? And so we ought to design a vocabulary with the old dehumanized ways and then the human side of that, and I got rebuked a little bit, and it was like, really good review. You said Why in your book, Steve and you do a great job of arguing about humans, but then you go a lead. He and he goes. It's a relationship, not elite. And I'm going, Oh, he got me. But that was like, Excellent. No, you're absolutely right. I mean, the lead is what you basically put on a dog to make sure it doesn't run into the road, but it's interesting you bring that up. So so within people. First, um, it's a very, very broad tent, but very quickly I had eight pillars that I hold in my head about the thinking of this, the work side and the commis side creating the business equation. Then I have three pillars that are called identity, data and technology. And on the other side I have language learning and value and all my thought process run around those those eight pillars, as I call them. And I'm bringing that up now because language is one of those pillars. Exactly that what you just said, The dehumanizing. It's like Listen to what a large bank or any large organisation will say about the relationship they have with you, how they want to partner with you, that you are the most important person and so on and so forth. Cut now to the inside of the building where that's coming from the marketing war room, where they talk about taking the hill about maximizing share of wallet. I mean, what language do you believe? I personally believe the language behind closed doors. So to me, we live in this world or transparency, but it's only transparent if it suits you. And another example. I've got a personal war on the word content, right? You wrote a book. I wrote a book. You write articles, you run podcasts, you do great things. And I'm trying to do great things. It is not content. Content is what you put in a silo. It's homogeneous, homogeneous stuff. If you can't fill that silo up with that content, you throw it away and put some other content in. What it does is it reduces the price that the corporate hash corporation has to pay for the homogeneous content because it's all the same. If you can't write the article for me, Hey, I'll get the article done by somebody else and they'll do it for free because they want to make their name big. And you think, Okay, so whose benefit is it to write? Content for free? I write books, articles, blog post. I do podcasts. I never do content. And if you want content, then I understand why the corporations call that content because they want it for cheap, as they can get it there about maximizing profit. But why do we, as creators and artists and writers as presenters talk about our intellectual property that we make a living off as content? It's a strange thing, but we get sucked into this corporate vocabulary, and that's another again in itself is just one pillar inside the people first
you know, we're having this conversation and I would love to kind of like think of all the vocabulary words that dehumanize the other side. Okay, so I would, you know, my So you said users. You said consumers, clients, prospects. But another one is like leads I got Hey, I got a lead, right? And so we ought to design a vocabulary with the old dehumanized ways and then human side of that, and I got rebuked a little bit, and it was like, really good review. You said Why in your book, Steve, you do a great job of arguing about humans, but then you go elite, he and he goes. It's a relationship, not a lead. And I'm going, Oh, he got me. But that was like, Excellent. Yeah, you're absolutely right. I mean, the lead is what you basically put on a dog to make sure it doesn't run into the road, But it's interesting you bring that up. So so within people. First, um, it's a very, very broad tent, but very quickly I had eight pillars that I hold in my head about the thinking of this, the work side and the commerce side creating the business equation. Then I have three pillars that are called identity, data and technology. And on the other side I have language learning and value and all my thought process run around those those eight pillars, as I call them. And I'm bringing that up now because language is one of those pillars. Exactly that what you just said, The dehumanizing. It's like Listen to what a large bank or any large organisation will say about the relationship they have with you, how they want to partner with you, that you are the most important person and so on and so forth. Cut now to the inside of the building where that's coming from the marketing war room, where they talk about taking the hill about maximizing share of wallet. I mean, what language do you believe? I personally believe the language behind closed doors. So to me, we live in this world or transparency, but it's only transparent if it suits you. Another example. I've got a personal war on the word content. You wrote a book. I wrote a book. You write articles, you run podcasts, you do great things, and I'm trying to do great things. It is not content. Content is what you put in a silo. It's homogeneous, homogeneous stuff. If you can't fill that silo up with that content, you throw it away and put some other content in. What it does is it reduces the price that the corporate hash corporation has to pay for the homogeneous content because it's all the same. If you can't write the article for me, Hey, I'll get the article done by somebody else and they'll do it for free because they want to make their name big. And you think, Okay, so whose benefit is it to write? Content for free? I write books, articles, blog post. I do podcasts. I never do content. And if you want content, then I understand why the corporations call that content because they want it for cheap, as they can get it there about maximizing profit. But why do we, as creators and artists and writers as presenters talk about our intellectual property that we make a living off as content? It's a strange thing, but we get sucked into this corporate vocabulary, and that's another again in itself is just one pillar inside the people first
So, John, what's, um where did you get this? Inspiration Even even really started beating the drums on this topic. Well, I mean, I've always been in the industry that I come out of the software industry. As I said, I'm a marketing guy, and I'm known for the guy that puts his hands up and go. Wait, wait, wait, wait. It's all very well, you saying that. But what about the customer? Why do they give a damn? Right? So in my business, world customer first is being my focus that we you need to give people a reason as to why they should give a damn about this stuff that you're producing. They're going to part with money, So it's naturally in me. And I guess the dawning on me sort of came to play maybe 67 years ago. Now, as I started thinking about this idea of, I've always hated the expression being a user, customers and clients. And what's the difference between a customer and the client? I just kept on thinking it was something jelling in me. I just said we're all goddamn people. Why are we we categorize it? Because we need to subdivide and create markets of one etcetera, etcetera. So just treat people intelligently as people. So, having got that to position, I happened to be working in the software business at the time. So I started getting involved with different organizations, and when I left that organization, I thought, I'm just going to turn this into something. I'm not gonna join something else. Let's let's take this out. I started doing that about four years ago. That's how old the original blog was. Newsletters about 2.5 years old now, So it's been a slow, steady progress is again. I'm not known for what I do. I'm known for a whole pile of other stuff, so plenty of people call and say, John, could you dot, dot, dot? And so, as I've been making this transition, we still have to make a living. So we make that living, but trying to move now into this space and bring everything that I have learned because you don't learn bad things in the corporation, you learn very good things you must do so all I'm saying is, that's great. How do you now apply all that learning you had in the corporation to you. How do you bring what Citibank does with its hundreds of marketeers to a baker? How do you do that? A lot. Again. Going back to the book. You know, the book is based on methodologies and approaches I've used in organizations for years, large organizations. I've just broken it down to a way that anybody, an individual, can now pick that book up, read through it and go, Oh, yeah, I can do this. So it's just It's been a slow process, a slow journey, but a great journey and meeting lots of good people on the way through.
businesses. So, John, what's, um where did you get this? Inspiration Even even really started beating the drums on this topic. Well, I mean, I've always been in the industry that I come out of the software industry. As I said, I'm a marketing guy, and I'm known for the guy that puts his hands up and go. Wait, wait, wait, wait. It's all very well, you saying that. But what about the customer? Why do they give a damn? Right? So in my business, world customer first is being my focus that we you need to give people a reason as to why they should give a damn about this stuff that you're producing. They're going to part with money, So it's naturally in me. And I guess the dawning on me sort of came to play maybe 67 years ago. Now, as I started thinking about this idea of, I've always hated the expression being a user, customers and clients. And what's the difference between the customer and the client? I just kept on thinking it was something jelling in me. I just said we're all goddamn people. Why are we we categorize it because we need to subdivide and create markets of one etcetera, etcetera. So just treat people intelligently as people. So, having got that to position, I happened to be working in the software business at the time. So I started getting involved with different organizations, and when I left that organization, I thought, I'm just going to turn this into something. I'm not gonna join something else. Let's let's take this out. I started doing that about four years ago. That's how old the original blog was. Newsletters about 2.5 years old now, So it's been a slow, steady progress is again. I'm not known for what I do. I'm known for a whole pile of other stuff, so plenty of people call and say, John, could you dot, dot, dot? And so, as I've been making this transition, we still have to make a living. So we make that living, but trying to move now into this space and bring everything I have learned because you don't learn bad things in the corporation, you learn very good things you must do so all I'm saying is, that's great. How do you now apply all that learning you had in the corporation to you. How do you bring what Citibank does with its hundreds of marketeers to a baker? How do you do that? A lot. Again. Going back to the book. You know, the book is based on methodologies and approaches I've used in organizations for years, large organizations. I've just broken it down to a way that anybody, an individual, can now pick that book up, read through it and go, Oh, yeah, I can do this. So it's just It's been a slow process, a slow journey, but a great journey and meeting lots of good people on the way through.
I wanted to pause right here and tell you about a book that you need to get today. It's the funniest book on marketing. It's called The Golden Toilet. Stop flushing your marketing budget into your website and build a system that grows your business. And guess who wrote it? That's right, I wrote it and I wrote it just for you because I want to help you get past the last hurdles of setting up your business and getting it squared away. I wrote it so that you can avoid time wasting time wasting money, wasting frustration. Get the book on Audible. You can get it on Kindle. You can get it on Amazon, but get the book, take advantage of the insights in there and let me know what you think. And now back to this excellent episode, you know, we're having this conversation and I would love to kind of like think of all the vocabulary words that dehumanize the other side. Okay, so I would, you know, my so you said users. You said consumers, clients prospects. But another one is like leads. Hey, I got a lead, right? And so we ought to design a vocabulary with the old dehumanized ways and then human side of that. And I got rebuked a little bit and it was like, really good review. You said Why in your book, Steve, you do a great job of arguing about humans, but then you go elite, he and he goes. It's a relationship, not elite. And I'm going, Oh, he got me. But that was like, Excellent. No, you're absolutely right. I mean, the lead is what you basically put on a dog to make sure it doesn't run into the road, But it's interesting you bring that up. So so within people First, um, it's a very, very broad tent. But very quickly I had eight pillars that I hold in my head about the thinking of this, the work side and the commerce side creating the business equation. Then I have three pillars that are called identity, data and technology. And on the other side, I have language, learning and value, and all my thought process run around those those eight pillars, as I call them. And I'm bringing that up now because language is one of those pillars. Exactly that what you just said the dehumanizing It's like listen to what a large bank or any large organisation will say about the relationship they have with you, how they want to partner with you, that you are the most important person and so on and so forth. Cut now to the inside of the building where that's coming from the marketing war room, where they talk about taking the hill about maximizing share of wallet. I mean, what language do you believe? I personally believe the language behind closed doors. So to me, we live in this world or transparency, but it's only transparent if it suits you. Another example. I've got a personal war on the word content, right? You wrote a book. I wrote a book. You write articles, you run podcasts, you do great things, and I'm trying to do great things. It is not content. Content is what you put in a silo. It's homogeneous, homogeneous stuff. If you can't fill that silo up with that content, you throw it away and put some other content in. What it does is it reduces the price that the corporate hash corporation has to pay for the homogeneous content because it's all the same If you can't write the article for me, Hey, I'll get the article done by somebody else and they'll do it.
So people first thought vision. What are some of the resources that you offer that would help people start to embrace or feel a little bit better about approaching? Yeah, that's changed that we're having to Yeah, so at core, I'm a sales and marketing dude. That's where I've lived my life in the software industry very specifically, and a long, long time ago, long before I was born even, um, there's a guy that had this idea of breaking the marketing story down into a garnering attention and interest, creating desire, moving to action. It's called the ADA model, and there are many versions around this. And what I've been doing over the past couple of years is really at that first part, the attention. So when you go to the I have a range of sites. People 1st 0.1 time. The vision sight is my blog. It used to live in a different world. I've recently moved across there. It's the blog, and very soon we'll have a certain amount of information about what's going on there. But I also have a newsletter that goes out on a weekly basis. That's called people First. Got news. I have my book coming out will be people first dot pub. I have a podcast, which is people first dot FM. And all of this is that garnering attention, getting interest. It's being a little bit provocative in all I write and do you know and another thing, What about this? And have you thought about that raising questions and building commentary? Yeah, in the past six months, I then started thinking, Okay, so that's great. You're in broadcast mode. How do you now start building a community around you? And for that I've built a network. Guess what it's called. It's called People First dot Network and People first dot Network. You'll find the start of a community that I'm beginning to build where people who can see what I'm writing. And indeed, I'm not the only person. There are many people in my space writing out this kind of stuff, and all have different opinions that are beginning to congregate in different spaces and people first. Don't Network is purely, uh, is purely a space for anybody to come in or listen to the words of wisdom. Some very interesting people that building software solutions that are building their own communities, offering courses, whatever it might be within that space as well. I will be offering courses at the moment. It's not there. It's all completely free to join. It's simply trying to build engagement and find out what's interesting to other people. Because the end of the day, if this ends up as being the John Show, it's not going to work. This is about bringing everybody together, even to the point that one of the site domains I have is called people first dot community, which once this takes off properly, I will then be used in the community site to link out to all my friends running other businesses in this space. So if you read a guy called Doug Rushkoff who has something called Team Human professor out of NY, he will be on that community list and DG me, which is an application of piece of software coming out of the UK, will be on that space. So the community world is the extended everything right? So I'm not trying to be Oh, guess what? I've just had this great idea. Tons of people are working on this. What I want to do My observation is that this is going on inside the bubble almost, and the people, whether it can really help, aren't that aware of it because you don't read about this in mainstream news, they hear something like the future of work. You hear people talk about it, and it's in such abstract, crazy ways that they talk about it that you think, Well, this is ridiculous. Yeah, stop being a coal miner and start coding. Really, it's not a solution, right? We We train people, we don't educate, and we train people to be a cog inside a corporate machine. And now the corporate machines are going automated and people are unemployed. We say, Well, go be an entrepreneur. How? When do we have to train people to do that? So that's my conversation. It's about understanding that when you talk about working from home because you're a knowledge worker on this, that's great for knowledge workers. That's how I make a living. But it's not great for a lot of people have to go to a factory or create some hair or drive attack, whatever it might be. All these things people are being affected by what goes around them. That's the space I'm creating now,
So you have a book coming out, and I'm gonna let you say the title because I'm gonna mess it up. But I've got an alternate title that for it. But go ahead. Okay, let's go for it. We could do that. It's called for business leaders slapped in the face by a world they thought they knew. Yeah, so mine would be like, What do you do after you get that big bitch slap from the world like I turned around and wham, where did that come from? But what's going on? Why do we need to Why? Why is the world we thought we knew different than and then we think so. The book. I mean, there's there's I've had many books in my head for many years, and this is the first of a series of books will be coming out, and it's been accelerated forward just with the odd time we're living in. It's nothing to do with the covid issue, but it's definitely to do with how business has. Businesses have reacted to what's going on around them, So covid is a side thing, as far as I'm concerned. But the fact is that businesses say, Expect the unexpected. Did the unexpected happen? And were we so unprepared? It's extraordinary. So the book doesn't offer a solution for you because everybody is different. I can't give you a template saying, if you do these things, But the book really is about making sure the next time this sort of change slaps you in the face that you can be ready for it. You can define the world on your terms and not have to react to what's going on around you. That's what the books about, and it really is. I see it more as a workbook, a journal, if you will, to help you start asking yourself questions, because what the butcher the baker and the candlestick maker need to do with their business is going to be a little bit different to what a business dealing with services industry or the call center or the banking industry. But they've all got the same problem that they've just been slapped in the face by a world they thought they knew. It's about change. Change is always occurring. It's going to get faster, so let's do something about it on our terms, on people's terms,
So you have a book coming out, and I'm gonna let you say the title because I'm gonna mess it up. But I've got an alternate title that for it. But go ahead. Okay, let's go for it. We could do that. It's called for business leaders slapped in the face by a world they thought they knew. Yeah, so mine would be like, What do you do after you get that big bitch slap from the world like I turned around and wham, where did that come from? But what's going on? Why do we need to Why? Why is the world we thought we knew different than and then we think so. The book. I mean, there's there's I've had many books in my head for many years, and this is the first of a series of books will be coming out, and it's been accelerated forward just with the odd time we're living in. It's nothing to do with the covid issue, but it's definitely to do with how business has. Businesses have reacted to what's going on around them, So covid is a side thing, as far as I'm concerned. But the fact is that businesses say, Expect the unexpected. Did the unexpected happen? And were we so unprepared? It's extraordinary. So the book doesn't offer a solution for you because everybody is different. I can't give you a template saying, if you do these things, But the book really is about making sure the next time this sort of change slaps you in the face that you can be ready for it. You can define the world on your terms and not have to react to what's going on around you. That's what the books about, and it really is. I see it more as a workbook, a journal, if you will, to help you start asking yourself questions, because what the butcher the baker and the candlestick maker need to do with their business is going to be a little bit different to what a business dealing with services industry or the call center or the banking industry. But they've all got the same problem that they've just been slapped in the face by a world they thought they knew. It's about change. Change is always occurring. It's going to get faster. So let's do something about it on our terms, on people's terms, yeah,
So you have a book coming out, and I'm gonna let you say the title because I'm gonna mess it up. But I've got an alternate title that for it. But go ahead. Okay, let's go for it. We could do that. It's called for business leaders slapped in the face by a world they thought they knew. Yeah, so mine would be like, What do you do after you get that big bitch slap from the world like I turned around and wham, where did that come from? But what's going on? Why do we need to Why? Why is the world we thought we knew different than and then we think so. The book. I mean, there's there's I've had many books in my head for many years, and this is the first of a series of books will be coming out, and it's been accelerated forward just with the odd time we're living in. It's nothing to do with the covid issue, but it's definitely to do with how business has. Businesses have reacted to what's going on around them, So covid is a side thing, as far as I'm concerned. But the fact is that businesses say, Expect the unexpected. Did the unexpected happen? And were we so unprepared? It's extraordinary. So the book doesn't offer a solution for you because everybody is different. I can't give you a template saying, if you do these things, But the book really is about making sure the next time this sort of change slaps you in the face that you can be ready for it. You can define the world on your terms and not have to react to what's going on around you. That's what the books about, and it really is. I see it more as a workbook, a journal, if you will, to help you start asking yourself questions, because what the butcher the baker and the candlestick maker need to do with their business is going to be a little bit different to what a business dealing with services industry or the call center or the banking industry. But they've all got the same problem that they've just been slapped in the face by a world they thought they knew. It's about change. Change is always occurring. It's going to get faster, so let's do something about it on our terms
success. So at people first thought vision, what are some of the resources that you offer that would help people start to embrace or feel a little bit better about approaching? Yeah, that's changed that we're having to Yeah, so? So, at core, I'm a sales and marketing dude. That's where I've lived my life in the software industry very specifically, and and a long, long time ago, long before I was born even, um, there's a guy that had this idea of breaking the marketing story down into a garnering attention and interest, creating desire, moving to action. It's called the ADA model, and there are many versions around this. And what I've been doing over the past couple of years is really at that first part, the attention. So when you go to the I have a range of sites. People 1st 0.1 time. The vision sight is my blog. It used to live in a different world. I've recently moved across there. It's the blog, and very soon we'll have a certain amount of information about what's going on there. But I also have a newsletter that goes out on a weekly basis. That's called people first got news. I have my book coming out will be people first dot pub. I have a podcast, which is people first dot FM. And all of this is that garnering attention, getting interest. It's being a little bit provocative in all I write and do you know and another thing, What about this? And have you thought about that raising questions and building commentary? Yeah, in the past six months, I then started thinking, Okay, so that's great. You're in broadcast mode. How do you now start building a community around you? And for that I've built a network. Guess what it's called. It's called People First Dot Network. And if people first dot Network, you'll find the start of a community that I'm beginning to build where people who can see what I'm writing. And indeed, I'm not the only person there are many people in my space writing about this kind of stuff, and all have different opinions that are beginning to congregate in different spaces and people first. Don't Network is purely, uh is purely a space for anybody to come in. Listen to the words of wisdom, some very interesting people that building software solutions that are building their own communities, offering courses, whatever it might be within that space as well. I will be offering courses at the moment. It's not there. It's all completely free to join. It's simply trying to build engagement and find out what's interesting to other people. Because the end of the day, if this ends up as being the John Show, it's not going to work. This is about bringing everybody together, even to the point that one of the site domains I have is called people first dot community, which once this takes off properly, I will then be used in the community site to link out to all my friends running other businesses in this space. So if you read a guy called Doug Rushkoff who has something called Team Human professor out of NY, he will be on that community list and DG me, which is an application of piece of software coming out of the UK, will be on that space. So the community world is the extended everything right? So I'm not trying to be Oh, guess what? I've just had this great idea. Tons of people are working on this. What I want to do. My observation is that this is going on inside the bubble almost, and the people, whether it can really help, aren't that aware of it because you don't read about this in mainstream news, they hear something like the future of work. You hear people talk about it, and it's in such abstract, crazy ways that they talk about it that you think, Well, this is ridiculous. Yeah, stop being a coal miner and start coding. Really, that is not a solution, right? We We train people, we don't educate, and we train people to be a cog inside a corporate machine. And now the corporate machines are going automated and people are unemployed. We say, Well, go be an entrepreneur. How? When do we have to train people to do that? So that's my conversation. It's about understanding that when you talk about working from home because you're a knowledge worker on this, that's great for knowledge workers. That's how I make a living. But it's not great for a lot of people have to go to a factory or create some hair or drive attack, whatever it might be. All these things people are being affected by what goes around them. That's the space I'm creating now,
Up Next
Add to playlist
New playlist

Embed

COPY
Embed Options
Create Playlist
Select the Station you want to upload this audio to
Station
0 / 140
0 / 2000
Playlist Icon Image:
(.jpg, .png, min size 500x500px)
Privacy
Subscribers
Your
voice
matters.
Discover & Listen to the world’s largest free collection of audio
Password reset

Enter your email address that you used to register. We'll send you an email with your username and a link to reset your password.



If you still need help, contact Vurbl Support
Password reset sent

You have been sent instructions on resetting you password to the email associated with your account. Please check your email and signing in again.


Back to Sign In
If you still need help, contact Vurbl Support
Your
voice
matters.
Discover & Listen to the world’s largest free collection of audio
Reset password

Please enter your new password below.



If you still need help, contact Vurbl Support
Your voice matters.
Discover & Listen to the world’s largest free collection of audio
Verify Email

Enter your email address that you used to register. We'll send you an email with a link to verify your email.



Cancel
Delete Profile
Are you sure? We will miss you :'(
Delete
Delete Audio
Are you sure?
Delete
Delete Playlist
Are you sure you want to delete this playlist?
Delete
Notifications Mark all as read
    You currently have no notifications
    Edit Snippet
    0 / 140
    0 / 140