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Brexit now Five years on....

From Audio: Five Years of Brexit....

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‎Europe Calling
Duration: 09:15
The EU is planning to massively reduce the amount of British TV shows and film shown in Europe because of their threat to 'cultural diversity' in the wake of Brexit. The move will be a blow to the UK's entertainment industry, which is boosted by the £1.4billion sale of international rights.
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The EU is planning to massively reduce the amount of British TV shows and film shown in Europe because of their threat to 'cultural diversity' in the wake of Brexit. The move will be a blow to the UK's entertainment industry, which is boosted by the £1.4billion sale of international rights.
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the border and the restrictions or non restrictions between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland disappear. Inasmuch, it will be an anomaly. It will be unique. That's it. But it will make everybody happy. I'll get the idea. That's what Boris johnson is trying to achieve. And the servant of the you do that the better for everybody. But now this is the trouble for the EU is there's there's so many people sit around the table in this case, there's 27 as the status. Sit around the table to reach agreement. And you're trying to get an agreement between 27. Pretty bad enough. Getting agreement between two, let alone agreement between 27 trying to satisfy all conditions that subcontracts after those conditions and and so on and so forth. Pizza dan. It's just ridiculous situation that the EU museum, it's a complete bureaucratic nightmare. What it lacks is somebody a leader that can see the sense through this and tweak things where it's necessary in this case. The Northern Ireland, Republic of Ireland border, it's easy to do. I don't see a problem with it. I don't think about courage sees a problem with it, but will they do? I don't think so. I don't know whether there's anything that's actually moving your end, but I can hear something banging terry, I'm not too sure what it is. Um but it could be as little as a mouse, you know the mouse if you're using a mouse. Um Okay, well, I mean immediately I'm thinking if you look at Norway and if you look at say Switzerland, both of whom trade quite comfortably with the european union, if we take Norway, surely it's got to be the same sort of problem for Norway as it has for Ireland. I mean if you've got ports with things coming in through the port, it's really there must be a way that they can do something similar to the way that working, that it works in Switzerland or as I say in Norway, that that's what my initial thought would be. Well, that's what the part of one of the Brexit agreement was. They tried to base it on the Canadian agreement, the Norway agreement. Um But the problem being is the um is a physical border. It's for Norway hasn't got a physical border, others such as between. But it's such a different situation. They don't have the political problem, the religious problem that exist in Northern Ireland and Republic of Ireland. And that is the problem. And hi how they're going to separate the good friday agreement and the Eu rules and regulations. I don't know, but they have to do it. They have to be a way around it. And to my mind, in reality, there is one way around this. It works every time it's called Common Bloody Center. Summers have got to sit down with common sense with rules in the background and reach an agreement. Everybody wants an agreement, nobody doesn't want an agreement. Who it appears. The EU management are quite happy to let this drag on and be it being a pain. My worry is that it blows up the so called troubles again in Northern Ireland and lives, Alaskan families are destroyed. If that happens, you can blow here, you at the water. Well, of course, that is also another thing that the EU itself must be worried about, which is if you've got, if you've got people who are in a club and then suddenly somebody leaves. It's a precedent. They've never had this before. So they've got to make some rules up somewhere. So surely it's in their own interests to have a successive rules which probably looking back in hindsight is a very big ally. But surely the there should have been something in place which would explain what happens when somebody leaves. Well this this is this is exactly the problem. They do not want anybody to lose. Therefore Britain has cabbage nose rubbed all the way through the last five years since the referendum as it's no rubbed into every bit admire. You can think of by the EU to deter any other contract from thinking that leaving leaving the union is an easy matter. It's their position to create as many problems as possible. And if lives are lust in Northern Ireland because of this, I will be really, really, really upset. And so a lot of other people or because of european bureaucracy, they have to create a shocking situation for Britain. In other words, Britain, leaving the EU doesn't work. It's a catastrophe. And economic catastrophe all round countries shouldn't do it because they know full well the Hungary Poland Greece, Italy, the Netherlands and Sweden, they're all waiting to make a move. All of them. They're all waiting to make a move and there's every chance that makes it. The Netherlands is going to be the next one. Okay. Um, uh, the piece that I was reading was saying the as european sat shell shocked at the crisis in Italy with the tsunami of cases and seemingly never ending spiral of death, Germany and France blocked exports of ventilators and proactive protective equipment. This is referring to something that happened four years after Brexit, european unity facing another huge tests when the coronavirus pandemic hits and a disjointed response from the european commission and the glaring absence of solidarity among the EU Member States questioned again the viability of the Union as of course, had it been uh you know, six years ago when maybe the pandemic hits, maybe things might have been different. Um, in some ways this was an understandable reaction. Um, this is the Germany and France blocking the exports of the ventilators and protective equipment, given the inevitability of the rapid spread of the virus among their own populations and the need for each government to prepare for that. But any semblance of european solidarity was vanquished. As a result, the EU was criticized for its lack of a definitive game plan to protect member States, crushing under the panic and magnitude of the pandemic. And although the commission has limited powers with regard to public health, the drought from Belgium's brussels was damaging a big bazooka response, targeting all of the devastation visited upon european economies livelihoods and political stability was needed for the block to prove it's capable of a strong response. Now they go on to the €750 billion recovery thunder plan based on collective debt and the issuance of grants to revive the european economy. This has gone far to restore faith in the european principle of solidarity, crucially. A substantial consensus exists among EU member states and observers that the recovery fund would not have been possible if the UK was still a member of the club. I think the greatest significance of Brexit lies in the fact that it removed from the remaining 27 members, one of the major obstacles to further integration. This is of course a reference to the UK. This is the professor talking to the journalist that has written this particular um article. If you ask yourself what would have happened during the pandemic. If the EU had still been a member of the EU. Two things stand out. One, I think it would have been much harder to get agreement over the next generation of funded recovery plan. That's the kind of thing historically that british prime ministers had always been resistant to rather than precipitating a fragmentation of the block. The UK's departure has kick started much needed cohesion among the Member States. The Brexit, of course, is far from over, and the U. K. Is frequently criticised for its attempt to pick apart Member status, Member States capitals. Let's go to the the thing that they've been talking about with the pandemic. Do you think the EU would have been worse off had the UK been part of the decision making process after this particular italian? Uh was the ITT
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