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Charlie Linville: Marine Veteran Amputee On Climbing Everest And Setting Big Goals

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station description From Military to Civilian...and Beyond!
SuccessVets: Advice For Veterans On Life After The Military
Duration: 34:14
How This Wounded Warrior Decided To Summit Mt. Everest To Inspire Others For more insights and resources from the interview, check out SuccessVets.com. Charlie Linville is a Marine veteran and recently became the first wounded warrior to climb Mt. Everest. In this interview, we talk about the challe
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How This Wounded Warrior Decided To Summit Mt. Everest To Inspire Others For more insights and resources from the interview, check out SuccessVets.com. Charlie Linville is a Marine veteran and recently became the first wounded warrior to climb Mt. Everest. In this interview, we talk about the challenges he overcame as an amputee, how his military training helped him prepare, and what his journey can teach others about goal setting and transitioning from the military.
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findings. And how is the view from the top? The view from the top is once in a lifetime thing. For me, it's kind of a culmination of everything that's been put into it. I mean, the three years of preparation and training for that view for that moment and to be able to look miles out into Tibet, you know, past the bet into China into Nepal and just a 360 degree landscape that's still breathtaking was worth every a bit of pain that I put into it. Well, congratulations again. I'm glad you got up there and stuck with it. Totally deserve it. And really inspiring. That's unbelievable. How long did you end up staying up there? Really Short. You think? Three years of training for 25 minutes of a group of the world. Yeah. Yeah. And then you got to go walk all the way back down. Yeah, that's only halfway, right. So yeah. Yeah, on all the hairy, scary trail, you just came up. Yeah. And now you know everything that Zatz ahead of you, right? And you have to go down, which is down is harder for me because my ankle doesn't articulate. So instead of having okay, I mean, there was really no special modification. Well, I mean slightly, but it's not like the technology and prosthetics is advanced to the point where you could climb Everest really easily. I mean, it's all it's still a limb that you have tow. You have tow, figure out ways to work around. Absolutely. And there actually was an Indian gentleman who was kind of a he was a new amputee, and he decided that he was going to try Everest, and he got up to the North Pole, which is really just the first camp above a B C. And he realized that he didn't have enough skill with this prosthetic limb to be there. And it's really just something you have to figure out through training. And so he got back down your back a couple weeks ago. You're resting. I'm assuming anything else on your plate currently. No, just coming home and being part of the family again. It's great to be with my wife and two daughters and be back toe my by bed that I didn't sleep in for four months. Yeah, just, you know, home and resting and giving my body a chance to recover. You know, going through the last three years, I could definitely feel myself started to deteriorate. I mean, I've got mawr injuries than just my amputated leg. Uh, and I could feel myself going downhill real quick. It was this year or not at all. And so now, being able to just give my body a chance to get back Thio Somewhat normal. I really looking forward, Thio.
findings. And how is the view from the top? The view from the top is once in a lifetime thing. For me, it's kind of a culmination of everything that's been put into it. I mean, the three years of preparation and training for that view for that moment and to be able to look miles out into Tibet, you know, past the bet into China into Nepal and just a 360 degree landscape that's still breathtaking was worth every a bit of pain that I put into it. Well, congratulations again. I'm glad you got up there and stuck with it. Totally deserve it. And really inspiring. That's unbelievable. How long did you end up staying up there? Really Short. You think? Three years of training for 25 minutes of a group of the world. Yeah. Yeah. And then you got to go walk all the way back down. Yeah, that's only halfway, right. So yeah. Yeah, on all the hairy, scary trail, you just came up. Yeah. And now you know everything that Zatz ahead of you, right? And you have to go down, which is down is harder for me because my ankle doesn't articulate. So instead of having okay, I mean, there was really no special modification. Well, I mean slightly, but it's not like the technology and prosthetics is advanced to the point where you could climb Everest really easily. I mean, it's all it's still a limb that you have tow. You have tow, figure out ways to work around. Absolutely. And there actually was an Indian gentleman who was kind of a he was a new amputee, and he decided that he was going to try Everest, and he got up to the North Pole, which is really just the first camp above a B C. And he realized that he didn't have enough skill with this prosthetic limb to be there. And it's really just something you have to figure out through training. And so he got back down your back a couple weeks ago. You're resting. I'm assuming anything else on your plate currently. No, just coming home and being part of the family again. It's great to be with my wife and two daughters and be back toe my by bed that I didn't sleep in for four months. Yeah, just, you know, home and resting and giving my body a chance to recover. You know, going through the last three years, I could definitely feel myself started to deteriorate. I mean, I've got mawr injuries than just my amputated leg. Uh, and I could feel myself going downhill real quick. It was this year or not at all. And so now, being able to just give my body a chance to get back Thio Somewhat normal. I really looking forward, Thio.
findings. And how is the view from the top? The view from the top is once in a lifetime thing. For me, it's kind of a culmination of everything that's been put into it. I mean, the three years of preparation and training for that view for that moment and to be able to look miles out into Tibet, you know, past the bet into China into Nepal and just a 360 degree landscape that's still breathtaking was worth every a bit of pain that I put into it. Well, congratulations again. I'm glad you got up there and stuck with it. Totally deserve it. And really inspiring. That's unbelievable. How long did you end up staying up there? Really Short. You think? Three years of training for 25 minutes of a group of the world. Yeah. Yeah. And then you got to go walk all the way back down. Yeah, that's only halfway, right. So yeah. Yeah, on all the hairy, scary trail, you just came up. Yeah. And now you know everything that Zatz ahead of you, right? And you have to go down, which is down is harder for me because my ankle doesn't articulate. So instead of having okay, I mean, there was really no special modification. Well, I mean slightly, but it's not like the technology and prosthetics is advanced to the point where you could climb Everest really easily. I mean, it's all it's still a limb that you have tow. You have tow, figure out ways to work around. Absolutely. And there actually was an Indian gentleman who was kind of a he was a new amputee, and he decided that he was going to try Everest, and he got up to the North Pole, which is really just the first camp above a B C. And he realized that he didn't have enough skill with this prosthetic limb to be there. And it's really just something you have to figure out through training. And so he got back down your back a couple weeks ago. You're resting. I'm assuming anything else on your plate currently. No, just coming home and being part of the family again. It's great to be with my wife and two daughters and be back toe my by bed that I didn't sleep in for four months. Yeah, just, you know, home and resting and giving my body a chance to recover. You know, going through the last three years, I could definitely feel myself started to deteriorate. I mean, I've got mawr injuries than just my amputated leg. Uh, and I could feel myself going downhill real quick. It was this year or not at all. And so now, being able to just give my body a chance to get back Thio Somewhat normal. I really looking forward, Thio.
findings. And how is the view from the top? The view from the top is once in a lifetime thing. For me, it's kind of a culmination of everything that's been put into it. I mean, the three years of preparation and training for that view for that moment and to be able to look miles out into Tibet, you know, past the bet into China into Nepal and just a 360 degree landscape that's still breathtaking was worth every a bit of pain that I put into it. Well, congratulations again. I'm glad you got up there and stuck with it. Totally deserve it. And really inspiring. That's unbelievable. How long did you end up staying up there? Really Short. You think? Three years of training for 25 minutes of a group of the world. Yeah. Yeah. And then you got to go walk all the way back down. Yeah, that's only halfway, right. So yeah. Yeah, on all the hairy, scary trail, you just came up. Yeah. And now you know everything that Zatz ahead of you, right? And you have to go down, which is down is harder for me because my ankle doesn't articulate. So instead of having okay, I mean, there was really no special modification. Well, I mean slightly, but it's not like the technology and prosthetics is advanced to the point where you could climb Everest really easily. I mean, it's all it's still a limb that you have tow. You have tow, figure out ways to work around. Absolutely. And there actually was an Indian gentleman who was kind of a he was a new amputee, and he decided that he was going to try Everest, and he got up to the North Pole, which is really just the first camp above a B C. And he realized that he didn't have enough skill with this prosthetic limb to be there. And it's really just something you have to figure out through training. And so he got back down your back a couple weeks ago. You're resting. I'm assuming anything else on your plate currently. No, just coming home and being part of the family again. It's great to be with my wife and two daughters and be back toe my by bed that I didn't sleep in for four months. Yeah, just, you know, home and resting and giving my body a chance to recover. You know, going through the last three years, I could definitely feel myself started to deteriorate. I mean, I've got mawr injuries than just my amputated leg. Uh, and I could feel myself going downhill real quick. It was this year or not at all. And so now, being able to just give my body a chance to get back Thio Somewhat normal. I really looking forward, Thio.
findings. And how is the view from the top? The view from the top is once in a lifetime thing. For me, it's kind of a culmination of everything that's been put into it. I mean, the three years of preparation and training for that view for that moment and to be able to look miles out into Tibet, you know, past the bet into China into Nepal and just a 360 degree landscape that's still breathtaking was worth every a bit of pain that I put into it. Well, congratulations again. I'm glad you got up there and stuck with it. Totally deserve it. And really inspiring. That's unbelievable. How long did you end up staying up there? Really Short. You think? Three years of training for 25 minutes of a group of the world. Yeah. Yeah. And then you got to go walk all the way back down. Yeah, that's only halfway, right. So yeah. Yeah, on all the hairy, scary trail, you just came up. Yeah. And now you know everything that Zatz ahead of you, right? And you have to go down, which is down is harder for me because my ankle doesn't articulate. So instead of having okay, I mean, there was really no special modification. Well, I mean slightly, but it's not like the technology and prosthetics is advanced to the point where you could climb Everest really easily. I mean, it's all it's still a limb that you have tow. You have tow, figure out ways to work around. Absolutely. And there actually was an Indian gentleman who was kind of a he was a new amputee, and he decided that he was going to try Everest, and he got up to the North Pole, which is really just the first camp above a B C. And he realized that he didn't have enough skill with this prosthetic limb to be there. And it's really just something you have to figure out through training. And so he got back down your back a couple weeks ago. You're resting. I'm assuming anything else on your plate currently. No, just coming home and being part of the family again. It's great to be with my wife and two daughters and be back toe my by bed that I didn't sleep in for four months. Yeah, just, you know, home and resting and giving my body a chance to recover. You know, going through the last three years, I could definitely feel myself started to deteriorate. I mean, I've got mawr injuries than just my amputated leg. Uh, and I could feel myself going downhill real quick. It was this year or not at all. And so now, being able to just give my body a chance to get back Thio Somewhat normal. I really looking forward, Thio.
findings. And how is the view from the top? The view from the top is once in a lifetime thing. For me, it's kind of a culmination of everything that's been put into it. I mean, the three years of preparation and training for that view for that moment and to be able to look miles out into Tibet, you know, past the bet into China into Nepal and just a 360 degree landscape that's still breathtaking was worth every a bit of pain that I put into it. Well, congratulations again. I'm glad you got up there and stuck with it. Totally deserve it. And really inspiring. That's unbelievable. How long did you end up staying up there? Really Short. You think? Three years of training for 25 minutes of a group of the world. Yeah. Yeah. And then you got to go walk all the way back down. Yeah, that's only halfway, right. So yeah. Yeah, on all the hairy, scary trail, you just came up. Yeah. And now you know everything that Zatz ahead of you, right? And you have to go down, which is down is harder for me because my ankle doesn't articulate. So instead of having okay, I mean, there was really no special modification. Well, I mean slightly, but it's not like the technology and prosthetics is advanced to the point where you could climb Everest really easily. I mean, it's all it's still a limb that you have tow. You have tow, figure out ways to work around. Absolutely. And there actually was an Indian gentleman who was kind of a he was a new amputee, and he decided that he was going to try Everest, and he got up to the North Pole, which is really just the first camp above a B C. And he realized that he didn't have enough skill with this prosthetic limb to be there. And it's really just something you have to figure out through training. And so he got back down your back a couple weeks ago. You're resting. I'm assuming anything else on your plate currently. No, just coming home and being part of the family again. It's great to be with my wife and two daughters and be back toe my by bed that I didn't sleep in for four months. Yeah, just, you know, home and resting and giving my body a chance to recover. You know, going through the last three years, I could definitely feel myself started to deteriorate. I mean, I've got mawr injuries than just my amputated leg. Uh, and I could feel myself going downhill real quick. It was this year or not at all. And so now, being able to just give my body a chance to get back Thio Somewhat normal. I really looking forward, Thio.
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