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Two of my favorite human beings, Brené Brown & Dolly Parton, discuss the power of healing through music through hearing our own story in song.
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Two of my favorite human beings, Brené Brown & Dolly Parton, discuss the power of healing through music through hearing our own story in song.
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so for me, they were lifesavers and I'll tell you why. Because all of those stories that you were telling in those songs were things that were unfolding in my family and things that I knew were whispers. They were the kind of things you heard about in the grownups card room or things that you heard about through the sheetrock walls and you knew they were happening. But she thought something must be really wrong with you because no one would tell the story. And then here you were singing them. Well, I can see where that would have made a difference in your life. That's one of the things I've always been so proud of when people like you tell me stories of how my music and my songs have helped them over some really bad times in their lives and I'm always fascinated with that, and so grateful that I've had the ability to, you know, to write these things where people come to me and say, you know, I was going through this hard time and I was thinking about committing suicide and then I heard your song this or that, and and it changed my life. So, I mean, I think God works through things like that. I think that if you have a gift and you're open to those things, you get the messages and you can get them out there. But I'm so happy that I had a good place in your life because you seem to have turned out all right, knowing here and all that stuff. Right? Yeah. Because you know what it was, It was like a big big old dose of empathy. It was like a message if you're not alone, like you were not afraid to tell a hard story, were you know, I wasn't and kind of going back to kind of what you said about you hear those things and they're in your own family. Nearly everything has happened to somebody. I mean, how many families do you know that Somewhere in and around that some girl is not had a child out of wedlock or people that have emotional and mental problems or people go through such horrible things, whether it's breakup or just their their lives, whether they're not, can't be comfortable in their own skin, they might be gay and nobody accepts them. And so many people become suicidal in the song the Bridge. Like I would hear those stories myself growing up, I knew all those things, I would hear things, I could say it through the walls and I knew things that were going on in the family. I was writing some really serious, heavy, huge songs when I was seven and eight years old, just from stories I hear my mom and my aunts and people talking about, Oh, I was nosy. I'm like, you, I heard everything. I pretend like I was not listening. I'd be doing something boy. I was just honed in on everything. So I think that that's one of the gifts about music. I think it's very healing, don't you? Oh God, yes. Just to know that there were problems and there was suffering but we weren't alone. It was shame, relief. Well, that's a good way of putting it. Yeah, that's great. Well, I'm so happy that I was there for you. Yeah, you were. And I got to tell you this other story. And it's funny because you have this amazing sense of humor and you can make anybody laugh about anything. But for me, because that was my introduction to you. You were always a very serious person to me when I hear other people like kind of joking and laughing and oh she's so fun. I'm like, oh yeah, we're talking about two different dolly Parton. I think a dolly Parton is like, she's on the truth train, she's gonna ride that sucker right into your life. There's no kidding around. So when I was in high school, my parents, along with three other couples went to go see 9 to 5 and two of the men walked out of the movie theater. And when my parents got home, my parents fought about that film for two weeks. My mom was like, yes, this is exactly what goes on in companies and the women are underestimated and mistreated. And it was like you became an icon in my family that month. Huh? No kidding. All because of like just the believing that women should be paid equal pay and uh why did the men walk out? It's too much about women. I think it was too much truth about how women are underestimated. Yeah. And I grew up like that too. I grew up all around all these male chauvinist pigs and thinking a woman's place which is however, wherever you say they should be. And I think that's all good. If that's what she wants to be, that's not the only place she can be or should be. So I wasn't really being in that movie trying to make a political statement of any kind, but we were addressing issues and I think it did a lot of good that movie we've still got a long way to go. But I thought the movie and itself was very entertaining. And I think Children even enjoyed the movie when we strung up the boss. They didn't know why. They just thought that was all funny with the boss hanging around and the animated part, you know that we did in our fantasies of what we would do to the boss and all that. So it really was entertaining in a lot of ways. But the base of that was really about so workplace situations and what it really meant for women to be appreciated and to be paid equal for equal work. And I really thought the movie was really wonderful. I was proud to be part of it. It was the first movie I had ever been in. God. It was I mean I just watched it recently to prepare for this interview and it has aged well. It is still as poignant and funny and real as it was. And what was that 1980 or 1981? 40 years ago this year, wow! I know. Ain't that amazing. Yeah, 40 years ago and it's still very relevant and they still play it all the time.
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