Group 4 Created with Sketch.
Your changes have been saved

Ep110: Tales of The Ramones with Ed Stasium

Share
station description The Podcast For Fans & Collectors of Vinyl Records!
The Vinyl Guide
Duration: 59:08
The Ramones defined the sound of popular music for decades, influencing countless bands in their wake. Yet, at the time, their success was limited. Ed Stasium was in the studio for most of their classic recordings and tells the tales of the Ramones; the music, the records, the people. If you like re
Snippets are a new way to share audio!
You can clip a small part of any file to share, add to playlist, and transcribe automatically. Just click the to create your snippet!
Snippets: Clips of Ep110: Tales of The Ramones with Ed Stasium that people like
Playlists that Ep110: Tales of The Ramones with Ed Stasium appears on.
There are currently no playlists containing this audio.
Add this audio track to one of your playlists
Add to Playlist
Up Next
Full Description
Back to Top
The Ramones defined the sound of popular music for decades, influencing countless bands in their wake. Yet, at the time, their success was limited. Ed Stasium was in the studio for most of their classic recordings and tells the tales of the Ramones; the music, the records, the people. If you like records, just starting a collection or are an uber-nerd with a house-full of vinyl, this is the podcast for you. Nate Goyer is The Vinyl Guide and discusses all things music and record-related. Web  |  Facebook  |  Instagram  |  YouTube
Snippet Transcripts
when it comes to the Ramones. Legacy E You're like the last guy that was in the room that's still around to be able to make some of these, uh, sonic decisions, I guess. Is there any sort of boundaries or guidance that you have when? When doing these remixes, like how to keep keeping the integrity of the band? But maybe not overstepping here. And they're like, What is your internal guidance for those sort of choices you have to make? My guidance is basically the spirit of the guys behind my back, uh, you know, giving me telling me what to dio and suggesting. You know, I worked with them on many records and know them quite well. So I think that they would enjoy what I'm doing on the records. I'm listening to them. I'm getting no feedback from the record companies or the estates on them. I have. I have the freedom of choice to do what I want to do on these, but I'm listening to the guys I'm listening Thio, Johnny DD Joey and Tommy saying, Hey, this that sounds good or don't do that or, you know, it just comes to me It z yeah, I hired a spiritualist and he were conjuring up. We're having sciences
you're Morin Heights. We were co engineering this pilot record, and the gear came in previous to the band and Roy coming in. And we had set up the drums in the drum booth, as was kind of stock practice. In those days, you had a drum booth and tried to isolate everything and everything was dead sounding. And you, you know, put carpeting on the fricking drums, for God's sake. Mhm. And when Roy came in the following day said, What are those drums doing that? You know, boost back there, Let's put them out in the main room. So we moved them into the room, and he wanted me to put up room microphones, which I'm like room microphones. What the fuck? I You know, I had no clue. And that inspired me, um, to start using, you know, crazy. He would mike the back of cabinets and, you know, Mike put a mic up down the hall from where the guitar speaker cabinet was always great things that, you know, I never thought of doing mind, you know, I had only been doing it for, you know, four years at that time is well, and you know, a little studio in New Jersey and where we blanket it everything up, literally putting moving blankets over guitar so it wouldn't bleed into anything else. And, you know, putting the drums in the drum booth. And it was all about the separation. And with Roy, it was all about the ambient sound and bleed eso when I couldn't use that philosophy on leave home for the fact that it was actually recorded in a block. But we recorded at Media Sound. It was a It was a Baptist church for years, for decades. And then when John Roberts and Joel Roseman put together a media sandwich, Fred Christie, they utilized the large church area for Studio A. So I put up a couple of there was probably 60 sevens, I think are 87 in the room to capture the room sounds. And when I got the multi tracks back, uh, last year the room sounds just was tremendous. It was great was in the Ramones. They're all playing at once. They're you know, one takes minimal editing, and we had Johnny separated off with some baffles and Dede in the back room. You get steering still here the guitar and bass in the room a little bit, but it was mostly drums and it sounded tremendous. So the new mix on Rocket to Russia is a what we're calling a tracking mix and it za band, and I based it on those room mix. I brought up the room Mike's first and brought the drums in that brought the guitar and the bass and then, um, got that balance of the band live in the studio. There are no guitar overdubs. There's no double tracking of guitars, there's no percussion, there's no backing vocals, and we always double Joey's vocal. And there was usually two or three tracks of Joey's vocal on the multi track. So I made new camps of Joey's vocal choosing between the best takes from the two or three tracks that we had. So it's just really the band live in the studio, and it's ah, a great representation of the power of the band during that period. It was also the last record that Tommy played on before he got into producing full time, And it's it's a tremendous, exciting mix. I really enjoyed the fans really love that. I've had so many people come up to me and tell me that they like it so much when it comes to the Ramones. Legacy E You're like the last guy that was in the room that's still around to be able to make some of these, uh, sonic decisions, I guess. Is there any sort of boundaries or guidance that you have when? When doing these remixes, like how to keep keeping the integrity of the band? But maybe not overstepping here and there were like, What is your internal guidance for those sort of choices you have to make? My guidance is basically the spirit of the guys behind my back, uh, you know, giving me telling me what to dio and suggesting. You know, I worked with them on many records and know them quite well. So I think that they would enjoy what I'm doing on the records. I'm listening to them. I'm getting no feedback from the record companies or the estates on them. I have. I have the freedom of choice to do what I want to do on these, but I'm listening to the guys I'm listening Thio, Johnny DD Joey and Tommy saying, Hey, this, that sounds good. Or don't do that or, you know, it just comes to me. It z you know, I hired a spiritualist and he said were conjuring up. We're having sciences.
their bits. Hey, didn't he didn't want to do that s o He relinquished the job toe myself and Tommy on. Hey, of course, they're all you know, we would put down stuff sometimes. Johnny would it would be Johnny approved and other things wouldn't be Johnny approved. Um, just just branching out a little bit, making it mawr of record more of a recording. But there was no insecurity from the band or particularly from Johnny about someone else coming in and doing guitar parts. Absolutely not. No, he wanted me to do them. Okay. Yeah, it was It was at his request. And I just spent, you know, and then I just fell into it. You know, I just started playing, you know, by the time, by the time I got the end of the century, I was playing in the band on all the tracking things. When it comes to the album, it's alive. How much is actually live And how much is overdubs? E Don't remember. There might have been some fixes in there. Mhm may have a couple fixes, but not much. Pretty. It's alive. Pretty alive way. Probably like spotted. A couple of you know D D probably went off here and there. Probably fix that up. Try to match that up. And there's a couple little things, but, you know, all the drums air, You know for sure. Uh, solid all the way. They didn't fix any drums, and we probably just spotted spotted some vocal stuff and guitar guitar based here and there. So I would I would I would say 95% of that is live. Okay? Yeah. There's the rumor is that it's 95%. Not so, uh, that's interesting to know. Will there be in its alive 40th anniversary version coming out as well? There will be something coming out. I'm not sure I would like to do a new mix. There's also a film that was a film company film that thing. So I would like to do a a blue right. Get a blue ray out on that with the 5.1 mix. I think that would be great. And I'd like to do and I'd like to Of course, I'd like to do a new mix on it just to get a little bit more definition and everything. Um, you know, with all of these box that way. Keep the original mixes as well re master them. Greg, Greg Calvi has been doing that. It's sterling sound, Um, and so we do have. It's not like we're redoing everything we have the original and this new, the new version and a lot of a lot of extra treats as well. Are all the tapes accounted for all the multi tracks, all the masters, everything. Every everything is accounted for there on the Warner Brothers, for all, the only thing that we couldn't find is the multi track for Sheena. And I don't care that somehow the last time I saw it was that power station we mixed. That was the first project to be done at Power Station was mixing rocket to Russia and we remixed, uh, Sheena and I don't care for the Rocket to Russia record. Mhm. And that's the last time that I saw that multi track It was 16 track record it, son Dragon and it Z gone missing. Somebody has it somewhere. It was it was it power station. But somehow it didn't get sent back with the rocket to Russia Masters to Warner Brothers. But they have everything. Billing lot. My associate and co producer on the box sets has been incredible at finding stuff and, you know, pulling together all the multi tracks and the master mixes and demos and all sorts of crazy shit that he finds unbelievable. He found this version of needles and pins that we put on the Rockets Russia box set that was recorded during that same period. I don't know. He thought I recorded it. I didn't record it. I don't know where it came from. He doesn't. He doesn't even know where it came from. It was like a fan had a cassette of it somewhere, but it z pretty cool. Interesting. So you're getting these multi track boxes opening them up for perhaps the first time in, you know, 35 40 years. Finding the notes, the track sheets, any interesting artifacts you found in while doing these projects. Um, well, like I said, the two songs that were recorded for Rocket to Russia that were never released. That's that's pretty cool. Um, but not not. You know, the traction is air there. Nothing. Nothing. Surprised May you know, um, things like on Ramona on Rocket to Russia I didn't realize that we had. There was an extra version there that we cut out for the master, and there's a bunch of harmonies on there on DE. So I would. I made a new mix of that different than the tracking mix but, uh, encompassing and had an extra verse with different lyrics. Yeah, but no lyric sheets. No, you know, many Chinese food? No, no, no, nothing like that. I just and Warner Brothers has all that stuff, so I get it on, not I get on approach rules file. And then they sent me PDFs of the track sheets, etcetera. So there's there's some coffee stains on the track. She's but no residual marijuana seeds or anything in the boxes because I didn't get the boxes because, you know, notoriously, uh, tape boxes were used for cleaning. We'd back in the day. Yeah, we were talking to the guys with Do the Queen Archive, and they when they went back to the master boxes, they found all sorts of stuff lyric sheets, ideas such is drawing that sort of thing. So that's cool. It always fascinates me. The time capsule type approach of some of these multi track boxes. Yeah. You know, as far as I know, there could have been some of that stuff in there, but I I actually did not see or touch the boxes. I just have PDS. So after end of the century, the band starts to fragment quite a bit more. What was your involvement from sweet dreams through Adios, amigos. Pleasant dreams. It was Oh, sorry. Pleasant dreams. No worries. Um, you know, I worked on the Well, the rock and roll high school songs. We did that before, In this century after end of the century, they went off. They worked with Graham Goldman, pleasant dreams and then with John Beauvois. And then they did bring Tommy and I back for I did demos. I did demos for pleasant dreams, actually at Daily Planet New York. And I have, I wish those multi track. So this is funny. Um, Johnny was a real spendthrift, so they had one rial of two inch tape, which they would do demos on at 59 p s for every record. But then they would they would erase them and to go on to the next one. So, um, I asked Monte a Melnick. Their their tour manager. Uh huh. Matthew, do you happen to know where that you know, that two inch tape is because there was in their possession and he didn't have any idea, but that that time, he told me, Yeah. We used to use that the same tape over and over again for every record. So, you know, the multi tracks were always erased. Johnny didn't want to spend the money to get any more take. Yeah, but I do have I don't even have quarter inches of that stuff. I have cassette copies, which will will probably pull, We have told actually in the past for some of the earlier Ramones re issues. There's, um, the demos render the century or from my cassette. And there's some other things for the gram Goldman. Pleasant dreams record that the demos that I did they were pulled from cassette as well. But eso I did the demos for that. And then, you know, they did that thing They went on, you know, trying other producers. Jambois Daniel Ray. Um but Tommy and I did come back. I guess it was in 1983 you know, is I think it's 1984 for too tough to die. When Marquis was not in the group anymore in Richie, a great Richie Ramone was now playing drums, and that that was that's a fan favorite, you know? Honestly, you know, some of the records, in my opinion, just did not live up to the standard that the first three records had. The first three records are the, uh, the trip Tik. I'm supposed to say the trip take of the Ramones, those first three records, they're just fantastic. Every song is great, there's not. There's not a bad one in the bunch. Great and a great spirit on those records and after end of the century, we still have kind of had that spirit. But you know, uh, kind of dissipated during the making of end of the century and then after that, with the troubles with the relationships, etcetera, the spirit lived on, but not as it did on the first three records. Eso Tommy. Like Tommy. I did come back for end of the century, and that was that was great to be reunited with the guys, and I was always in touch with Joey and Johnny. We would talk a few times a year, even when I wasn't working with them. And also, you know, to the to the end with both of them, I would. We were friends, Um, and, you know, didn't didn't wasn't that much in touch with Dee Dee. Um, Richie, I still see occasionally, Marquis. I don't see it all, Um, And then, you know, if they went on to, you know, several other records, Then I came back to do Mondo bizarro in the nineties with them, which I thought was a great record. And there's some good songs on there. Johnny wasn't a big fan of the record. Of course. Joey loved every record that they did. Every one of them. Hey, loved him. He was a Really what? A spirit. Great spirit. Joey is
Do you think it was about that album and the process and the result that really changed the band. It drove everybody crazy. Um, Johnny hated being there. Johnny. Johnny quit the record at one point after the infamous stint playing that first chord to rock n roll high school over and over and over again. Now let me interject and say that, you know, Johnny did not want to go do the record unless I came along. Um, you know, I didn't produce that record. I didn't even engineer that record. I engineer a couple things couple guitar overdubs that I did, uh, And when I took the masters and went to another studio with it to do some overdub because at that time, you know, after, you know, you know, I gradually started being quote unquote the fifth Ramon, you know, playing, singing, backing vocals And, you know, playing guitar on the records. Uh, Johnny, you know, had a lot of trust in May. You like my taste? We got a longer good friends. And when uh, Seymour finally gave in to fill, uh, to do the record, Johnny wouldn't go unless I was with them on by credit as musical director on that particular record. I was in the studio with them actually playing guitar, all of the backing tracks. Johnny wanted me to play with him. They, you know, because I was adding parts, especially on road to ruin, added a lot of parts. Tommy and myself did. Um, and Phil was driving us pretty nuts to begin with with continuous playback at incredible volume playing songs back, you know, hundreds literally hundreds of times dozens of times stopping the tape and excruciating, painful volume. And he'd be stomping on the floor and screaming and swearing and eso When it got Thio Rock and Roll High school we were starting off the song with both Johnny and myself hitting a chord and then obtaining feedback. We're out in the room right next to the amplifiers. There was just a couple little go bows, baffles separating, you know, the drums and the amplifiers out in the room. There was no isolation at all. We're all out in the same room. And, uh, you know, we counted off 1234 and hit that cord. And then Phil would on and on do it again. Do it again and fills in the control room with the the great engineer. Larry Levine fills engineer and, you know, one of the best in one of the greatest. Engineers have to come out of Los Angeles Grammy winner We got a Grammy for working with Herb Alpert on whipped cream and other delights. I believe the taste of the taste of honey was on there so he would be telling. We saw him in the control room, jumping up and down and, you know, yelling at Larry trying to get something going. I don't know what it was. None of us knew what it was. Johnny and I kept looking at each other. Johnny's, you know, rolling his eyes again. We're doing it again. Uh, probably did that for around 2.5 hours, just pointing that one. That one chord. Johnny at one point turned that into 8 to 10 hours, which it wasn't, um, but it was still very difficult to swallow and not knowing there was no communication with control when we were just out there banging. You know the cord, um, out there, lighting up, cigarette after cigarette going. What the fuck is he doing in there?
now, you briefly touched on the re issues that you're doing, uh, as of late, and I believe the rocket to Russia and leave home 40th anniversary box sets, which is kind of complete. What is the difference between the original mixes and what is called the Ed Stacy? Um, mixes. Um, well, we didn't name the Med Stacy a mixes era. I'll leave home. Um, it was just basically a new mix. I was never really happy. We did that mix very, very quickly. And there is not a lot of definition in the drums. And there was a lot of reverb and the guitars were split really, really wide left and right. And over the years I, Tommy and I in the band we had discussed, actually, you know that we we we discussed that we weren't happy with those mixes. So, uh, on leave home, I just brought more definition to the drums. Um, didn't use as much of the double track guitar. Uh, kind of made it a little bit more mono ish. And in your face, there's way less reverb on it. It's still the elements that we used all the backing vocals and guitar rhythms and percussion that we used on the original mix. It was just a little more. It's a bit more refined and, like I said in your face for leave home. So it Z the same elements in the mix is nothing drastically different is just refined, and there's more clarity to it and less, uh, less washed. Uh, you know, way, way less reverb were, for some reason, I was You know, we're in a really reverb kick back there and whatever we mix that, you know, 75 7 76 um, now with rocket to Russia. When I got the multi tracks, um, we had recorded, uh, rocket to Russia at Media Sound. We did a son Dragon was a tiny little studio. It was a box, basically, and there's no room for any ambient microphones. It was 16 track when we went to do Rocket to Russia's 24 track and I was able to finally put room mix into the picture. I didn't know anything. You know, I basically learned how to record by myself, didn't didn't go to school. Didn't have anybody teaching me. I didn't apprentice. I didn't, um, learn from anybody. I kind of picked it up on my own. And from what I saw in a couple of studios that I had been in. And when I was working at the studio Morin Heights, I had the opportunity to work with the greed Roy Thomas Baker. This was It was just after he had it was right when Queen we're peaking with a night at the Opera. And he was doing a band called Pilot and Myself and Nick Clegg ona the other engineer. Hey, was the chief engineer, the studio Morin Heights. We were co engineering this pilot record, and the gear came in previous to the band and Roy coming in, and we had set up the drums in the drum booth, as was kind of stock practice. In those days, you had a drum booth and tried to isolate everything, and everything was dead sounding. And you, you know, put carpeting on the fricking drums, for God's sake. Mhm! And when Roy came in the following day, said, What are those drums doing that? And you know, boost back there, Let's put them out in the main room. So we moved them into the room and he wanted me to put up room microphones, which I'm like room microphones. What the fuck? I you know, I had no clue. And that inspired me to start using, you know, crazy. He would mike the back of cabinets and, you know, Mike put a mic up down the hall from where the guitar speaker cabinet was always great things that, you know, I never thought of doing mind, you know, I had only been doing it for, you know, four years at that time is well, and, you know, a little studio in New Jersey and where we blanket it everything up literally putting moving blankets over guitar so it wouldn't bleed into anything else. And, you know, putting the drums and drum booth. And it was all about the separation. And with Roy, it was all about the ambient sound and bleed eso. When I couldn't use that philosophy on leave home for the fact that it was actually recorded in a block. But we recorded at Media Sound. It was a It was a Baptist church for years, for decades. And then when John Roberts and Joel Roseman put together a media sandwich, Fred Christie, they utilized the large church area for Studio A. So I put up a couple of There was probably 60 sevens I think are 87 in the room to capture the room sounds. And when I got the multi tracks back, uh, last year the room sounds just was tremendous. It was great was in the Ramones. They're all playing at once. They're, you know, one takes minimal editing, and we had Johnny separated off with some baffles and Dede in the back room. You get steering still here the guitar and bass in the room a little bit, but it was mostly drums and it sounded tremendous. So the new mix on Rocket to Russia is a what we're calling a tracking mix and it za band, and I based it on those room mix. I brought up the room Mike's first and brought the drums in that brought the guitar in the base and then, um, got that balance of the band live in the studio. There are no guitar overdubs. There's no double tracking of guitars, there's no percussion, there's no backing vocals, and we always double Joey's vocal. And there was usually two or three tracks of Joey's vocal on the multi track. So I made new camps of Joey's vocal choosing between the best takes from the two or three tracks that we had. So it's just really the band live in the studio, and it's ah, a great representation of the power of the band during that period. It was also the last record that Tommy played on before he got into producing full time. And it's It's a tremendous, exciting mix. I really enjoyed the fans really love that. I've had so many people come up to me on and tell me that they like.
uh, how did you first start working with the band? Uh, it's through Tony Bon Jovi. Um, earlier in my career, I had an association with Tony and the first studio. I worked at Venture Sound, and he was partners with Tony Carmelo, uh, adventure sound in New Jersey, which was the first studio I worked at. Um, Tony and Tony had some kind of break up as lovers dio on Bond. I fell into place at Venture Sound Engineering. Years later, I was in New York doing a telethon with Geraldo Rivera. Um, it was there was a big scandal on Long Island. Anyway, Geraldo came up with these benefits for to help these kids out. And I ran to Tony Bon Jovi and he asked me to join the staff that was was going to be Power station. At the time I was living in Canada, working at the studio, Morin Heights and I moved back to start up this new studio. And one of the first projects that I worked on was the Ramones. Leave home. Tommy Ramone, Tom or Tommy Early had worked with Tony at record plant, and they did not want to work with Craig Leon again on the second record, and the the only other producer that Tommy knew was Tony Bon Jovi s O. I was part of the package when we when I when I came back from Canada, moved back to the two New Jersey, actually, and was put on staff salary even though we knew were going to build a studio. But the building had not been found. Nothing. We were just searching for studios. And I was, um, working with Tony on projects, and that's how I was introduced to the remote.
everyone. Welcome to this week's episode of The Vinyl Guide, the podcast for fans and collectors of vinyl records. And this week we are speaking with Ed Stays IAM, a music producer whose credits include Talking Heads, Living Color, Smithereens, Misfits, The Empty Hearts, Mick Jagger and Mawr. However, today we're going to talk to Ed all about his time with the Ramones. Ed was in the recording studio with the Ramones for most of their greatest work, not only recording and producing, but playing on the records to join us today is we talk about what it was like being in the recording studio with Ramon's The Stories behind the albums. We love the insane shenanigans that happened when Phil Spector is in charge and much, much more, and this week's episode is by
Up Next
Add to playlist
New playlist

Embed

COPY
Embed Options
Create Playlist
Select the Station you want to upload this audio to
Station
0 / 140
0 / 2000
Playlist Icon Image:
(.jpg, .png, min size 500x500px)
Privacy
Subscribers
Your
voice
matters.
Discover & Listen to the world’s largest free collection of audio
Password reset

Enter your email address that you used to register. We'll send you an email with your username and a link to reset your password.



If you still need help, contact Vurbl Support
Password reset sent

You have been sent instructions on resetting you password to the email associated with your account. Please check your email and signing in again.


Back to Sign In
If you still need help, contact Vurbl Support
Your
voice
matters.
Discover & Listen to the world’s largest free collection of audio
Reset password

Please enter your new password below.



If you still need help, contact Vurbl Support
Your voice matters.
Discover & Listen to the world’s largest free collection of audio
Verify Email

Enter your email address that you used to register. We'll send you an email with a link to verify your email.



Cancel
Delete Profile
Are you sure? We will miss you :'(
Delete
Delete Audio
Are you sure?
Delete
Delete Playlist
Are you sure you want to delete this playlist?
Delete
Notifications Mark all as read
    You currently have no notifications
    Edit Snippet
    0 / 140
    0 / 140