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FMP 010 – Aphasia

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station description The Freio Music Podcast: Musician Interviews - Featuring artists from around the w... read more
The Freio Music Podcast
Duration: 01:53:42
The Freio Music Podcast


Episode 010 - Aphasia






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Overview

The featured artist in this episode of the Freio Music Podca
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The Freio Music Podcast


Episode 010 - Aphasia






Overview




Description




Links





Overview

The featured artist in this episode of the Freio Music Podcast is Aric Rudnick aka Aphasia. Aric reveals how he creates and utilizes custom sample packs. Aphasia's music is electronically produced and with attention to detail. Aphasia's songs have an underlying clarity and smoothness but vary widely in regards to tempo.  To give you a little taste of his music we have inserted a few short song clips to illustrate his techniques. Enjoy this long interview and conversation with Aphasia. Stay Tuned!

Description

The featured artist in this episode of the Freio Music Podcast is Aric Rudnick aka Aphasia. Aric reveals how he creates and utilizes custom sample packs. Aphasia's music is electronically produced and with attention to detail. Aphasia's songs have an underlying clarity and smoothness but vary widely in regards to tempo. Aric reveals how he is able to balance a budding music career with his day job and still create art daily. Aric is strategic about his health and art by 'turning on his antenna' and getting adequate sleep despite his tendency for making music at 3am. Aric is only 24 years young and already has a solid foundation that will propel him forward. Enjoy this long interview and conversation with Aphasia. Stay Tuned!

Links

Aphasia' Links:
https://soundcloud.com/officialaphasia
https://www.instagram.com/aphasia.beats/
https://facebook.com/officialaphasia/
 
Adm x Eve
https://soundcloud.com/admxeve
https://www.facebook.com/admxeve/
https://www.instagram.com/admxeve/



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Full Transcription & Show Notes
Snippet Transcripts
a lot of people think they can do without sleeping workaholics like I'll just sleep less sleep when I'm dead. Yeah, you're more like you'll die if you don't sleep like and we know, yeah, So for me, mental clarity is really important, And sleep helps me with mental clarity a lot. So that's all. I really don't sleep As far as my opinion goes. It's like, really, though people should study sleep. They should look at the studies on how it reflects into mental states how it reflects into overall physical health. It's important to sleep, I think, and in electronic music there's a lack of sleep going on in the scene, and that's not healthy. I'm not saying we need to change all the shows to start at 3 p.m. Or anything like, I like to have a late night and have fun to like anyone else. But I just bring that up because a lot of people, an artist to that, you know, care a lot about their work and having a career in music. They make sleep something that's not important, and I think that's really bad. I think there's a reason there's a lot of depression in the scene. Lot of musicians get really depressed. A lot of there's a lack of mental health. There's there's a lack of health, I think, and I think sleep is a big part of that for me. Making sure I sleep correct has been actually a big deal. More important, though, you brought up meditation. I mean, I single handedly. One of the more important things I engage with in my life is meditating because it's just listening to your breath and focusing on what your minds trying to throw at you as you. I mean, for me, all meditating is, is focusing on your breath and being in the present moment. It doesn't have to be in any position to sit a certain way. Do you have a mantra or anything audible? I don't. I just listened to my breath, I think, and I did get into it honestly from like when I was young. I learned some things about Buddhism and a lot. They are like they invented it more or less. I think Hindus did, but the Buddhist brought it to really practical place, but myself, it's very simple. I just focus on my breath. Maybe I'm sitting cross legged and maybe I'm sitting in a chair. Maybe I'm laying in bed for me. It's just a matter of not being a victim of my thoughts, but being an observer of them, watching them occur and trying to disassociate myself from the reactions. Because we okay, we're reactive creatures. Things happen, we react. That's how we've survived. We've learned how to react to things in certain ways. We also react to our thoughts. We like to think we create our thoughts more or so we get that we get them like a package in the mail and we decide what to feel or think or do. Sometimes we decide what to feel. Sometimes the feeling kind of comes with it. But all meditating is for me, is dissociating from that cycle, and trying to watch it occur more than flinging around with the that cycle of thought reaction, thought reaction, choosing my reaction to be watching. That can be the reaction. Watch your reaction can be non action. Yeah, more or less. I think that's what it comes down to. So meditating is good for me. Mental health wise, I use
So after, like, 16 17, where a lot of my friends in high school about sports and other things I was into, which was cool, too, um started might be more about music. And then I started meeting people and they started throwing these parties on the woods, and I started getting little slots to play and nothing crazy but a lot of fun. Were you nervous at first time? I think so. But I was also in a pretty interesting place in my life of, like, not caring. Kind of. I think a lot of us go through that when we turn 18, we think we know a lot. We kind of just go for it. But yeah, there's definitely nervousness. I was, you know, practicing my set a lot and trying to be all ready for it, but also was poor. So I had the most danke setups you could imagine. Just these little sketchy laptops. I could barely boot, and it just barely happened back when I was that old. But I mean, there's good times. So what equipment were you working with? You have a laptop? Yeah, like it was. I've always been on PC. So It was like a PC laptop running like little DJ Softwares. I mean, now I use an Alienware 15 inch laptop able to 9.7. So 10, many beyond 10. Very soon, but able to know Alien where able to push now works good for me. I like that a lot. Um, but back then, it was like I was using this DJ software by avid and my little HP last. Did you have any hardware? Yeah, I went through different MIDI controllers had this actual dedicated DJ controller for a while, and all the knobs stopped working. I was just beat that thing to hell. And then and then I would use I would just map midi keyboards to be DJ controllers for a while. I did that for a while. Tell me about that. Describe that for somebody I would take like an M audio midi keyboard. That's really meant for playing like notes into a audio software. And I would just map the different keys like the far left key would be the play button for the left track. The far right key would be the play button for the other deck. I would just change it from being a keyboard to being a DJ controller, being a control. Use the eight knobs for the different things you would need for deejaying, filters and volumes and stuff. So I would always kind of make it work. I was really to your programming it from a young age. Yeah, but it was in the software. I had it as easy as right clicking and hitting the hitting. The thing, yeah, would map it. So I was lucky to have one that made it easy on me. I wasn't doing that deep of stuff to make that happen, but that's how I got out there and was able to play a little sets here and there. But I think it's so important to as as an artist, too. Start with what you got and figure out how to make it more in a way like you have to get out there. Some people wait to have it all the perfect equipment and the perfect opportunity. I think you do have to kind of just get out there and do your best, sometimes without settling. Yeah, there's a balance there where you want to make sure you can like I look back and I'm like, Gosh, I'm lucky at that set. Didn't train wreck or my laptop didn't die in the middle of the set or whatever. Yeah, I think there's an aspect of respect for the crowd where you show up prepared enough to, um, But there's a balance of, like, get out there, you know, don't wait too long. Well, I just feel like if you were wanted to start making music today, if you've never made music in your life, you don't need to walk into a million dollar studio to start. Actually, not these days, you know, and it would be terrifying. It would be the absolute wrong move, because there's too much going on and you really don't know even you know what the signal flow is or how to work on an instrument. And there's so much to be learned. So you just got to start small with whatever you have. I agree. I think I understand what you have in front of you before you add more is important, like you want to make music on a computer, understand computers enough to be good at making computer music not to become a genius and know how to build your own or whatever, which probably would be good for most computer musicians to know how to do. But no them enough. I mean, your job is going to depend on it if you want this to be a career or just if you want to be professional. I did do a good job. You're gonna want to first understand your computer. Like I know I've seen some guys go out and buy all the top of the line akai controller a PC. This and all these different mixers and some people. Maybe that's good. Maybe it motivates them to do more music making. But in my opinion, I'd say Learn what's in front of you Get really good on the Daw or whatever audio software using with just the mouse. Whatever you have. So you like. For me, buying gear is just to solve a workflow problem. Like I'm spending too much time drawing notes with my mouse, get a midi keyboard, maybe take a few lessons on playing keyboard because like you can have a keyboard. If you don't know how to play a keyboard, it's almost worse than just drawing in notes. I understand you have to correct all the wrong knows. Yeah, so what? It's like a wash, almost like if you depending on how you handle that, I think. But it's really there's no one way to do it. Um, that's kind of how I always did it. I had a mouse and keyboard in a computer for like, six years. That's all I had. I think for kids these days are just people getting into it, whether young or old, getting I think the most important thing is a quality speakers or headphones first and foremost, like probably headphones before anything else, because you can even get good speakers. But put them in a bad room and fool yourself. You know, getting really good headphones and getting listening to lots of music on that pair of headphones and then going and making music on them. Tell me about what good headphones are in your mind. Um, right, good is such a subjective word. Well, yeah, and you know, if you had a million dollars is different than if you had You know, when you're 15, starting out. But we're What do you like at the moment? I use audio Technica, the GTX, I think 50 they're good. I think for me it's important to not get. I would say Make sure the headphones don't have an inherent boost in any range. Some headphones have an inherent bass boost, for instance like, Yeah, okay, you can say it. Yeah, they I think they do. I've at least heard that I had some beats in the past and I sold them for something else. But to be fair, there's electronic producers that produce on beats and they're very successful. I believe it. But the trick, the trick is tuning your ear. So what's a What's a song that you kind of want to have the same sonic quality as or the same relative base level as or something? Listen to that on that pair, but get used to what that sounds like, and then you go make music on it for me. I went with I have heard their flat. I went and listen to music on a lot. In fact, my girlfriend had him for a long time, so I would listen to music on them for a while, and I just I like the response for me. I like headphones that kind of hug my ear and keep you know, if you push them against your ear, you get that good base down. I wanted headphones that just did that. Just resting there, that's what those where I feel like I got that. Because with headphones you can make the room right there on your head in the room with monitors. You have to actually get them to marry each other. Which, to be fair, I think everyone should have that eventually. If they're going to be doing electronic music, get a good room, get good monitors. Yeah, start with just headphones. Computer. Just have fun like it's really about. Have fun. Get into yourself with the music is how I would. That's what it is for me, like use the music to discover more about my like. You can uncover really bad parts of your character by making music, which is really interesting and helpful. I think good parts of your character things you like things you didn't know you like. It's weird. So you've got an introspective with your music when you're making it. I've tried to, and I've not always been steadfast in that. But that's been something that is important to me as to use it as a tool for self discovery, because you you can see it's just a reflection of where your minds at any given time to be in a you're just opening a computer and just telling it to make noises. So why did you decide to keep those noises and not those? Why did you keep those notes and others? In a weird way, it can kind of show you different trends. If you're honest throughout the process, like sometimes you'll do something and you'll tell yourself, or I'll tell myself, Oh, I just did that because I heard such and such artists do that. And that uncovers a part of myself that I need to be aware of that, like we do socially copy each other, and it's not always a bad thing, but being aware of it's good help. It can help me stay more genuine, like Okay, okay, he did that. Maybe I'll do something else, you know. And other times I'll ask myself, Why did I do that? And it will be a more genuine answer, like it made me feel this emotion that that I care about that's a different now. I might go down that trail longer. Maybe that's more meaningful. So in some ways it uncovers parts yourself, not even just the making of music just being in in the industry and seeing how you react to different influences, too. It's an interesting, interesting pursuit, and I think we all are affected emotionally by certain music. You know, depending on what that emotion is. It just like we're saying earlier cuts past your ego and it just makes you feel something. So if you reflect on that constantly, I think it's for me. It's really fun because I've gotten to learning a lot about myself and people in general psychology, almost just from making music and talking to people about it and stuff.
when I play shows, it's right. Now it's able to push. It's a Bolton. It's the Alienware. That's it. Um, I D j That way at home, I have a PC that I made. I'm a total nerd, so I built my own PC able to turn on their lots of VSD plug ins and stuff like that. Um, we have some hardware. Uh, my girlfriend and I make music together. We have our page, Adam and Eve A DMX Eve. Um, so she she plays guitar, bass, piano. So we do have some hard where we have, like, we have like a Marshall stack. We have some stuff like that. Sometimes we'll run audio through, and but a lot of my I'll be honest. A lot of my production is in the computer. A lot of software plug ins. Um, we do have the Rolling Phantom or Amber. It's hers, Really? But we both use the Rolling Phantom. Um, it's like a digital sampler synthesizer, but yeah, most of it is VSD plug ins, able 10. Um, I do a lot in midi or at least started in midi. Um, like like I said, growing up, I was a lot of just computer mouse keyboard, so I really don't a lot of times feel like I need to get out of outside the box and start wiring up. Since though, I honestly would have a lot of fun doing that. I'm sure I I don't plan to keep myself all software, and I have done some fun things outside the box with hardware. But let's let's dive into the software for a second because that's where you started. And clearly you know how to make things work. What what plug ins do you seemed to leverage the most? Um, I use ominous fear, a lot of atmosphere. It's got that lush atmospheric base that I really want for my music. But I'll do a lot of even. Just Operator is one of the free ones that comes with a Bolton. People underestimate that plug in all the time. A lot of times people underestimate the ones that come with their dog. So I'll use operator and I think I have a lot of fun using the microphone. I'll seeing some note like I suck at singing, but I'll just put some audio into my microphone auto tune that make that and do a sense. So I like to not stay in any one plug in too much I have been What are you using to auto tune your voice. Uh, even manual ill due to manual tuning and able to a lot of Yeah, interesting. Yeah, there's a few ways to automation mapping, and like you draw depends. You could draw in the notes. It depends. It kind of depends. Case by case, Sometimes I might use like isotope like nectar is one of the vocal processing of use. But it depends. Sometimes I'll just find, like sometimes I'll just try to hum for awhile and just find the section where I was the most consistent and just keep that okay, tune that. It gives it more character. If you use too much of an algorithm to auto tune it now it sounds almost just like a synth. So it kind of depends, though, how I wanted to come out. I'll use a few techniques for that, but yeah, ominous fear serum, a few different ones, but it really depends. I, uh they all do a lot of the same things as each other, and then some of them have some unique things that only they do. But, um, I like to mix it up. And, like I, I've got a lot of the main ones. People will use massive and stuff, but I don't think it's about really the tool. As much as just hearing the good like sorting through the madness is the key with all these different tools, hearing what it did that was good and keeping it and hearing what it did that was bad and just relentlessly deleting or changing. Yeah, not looking back, Yes, taking every little good thing that comes out and just really focusing on it. It's a lot of sifting for me. Create lots and lots of sound and sit down to the good stuff. I get a lot of my crazy, weird sounds. And how do you figure out what the right combination of layers to sift down into like the essence of your song? It's really subconscious for me. That's how I mean there's some best practices, like keeping certain sounds and certain frequency ranges, and I do definitely mindful of those kind of engineering techniques mentioned any. If you feel like it, well, just just, you know, giving something the lows. Giving something them is getting something, the highs and keeping them in there and like that's definitely part of it. But it's an overall feeling I get. It's a subconscious thing, and a lot of times I'll I have to stop and come back to a song to make sure that that was that that keeps happening, that that feeling keeps happening. Sometimes it happens just the first time you get really excited about it and you listen to the next day and you've got to be honest and be like they just don't work together. Maybe I thought that worked right Lot of honesty a lot of just, um, but also not caring too much. Not too much attachment is important with electronic music. Um, there's always more sound that can be made. Just delete it if it's not a if you're not really excited about it, that's something I got from like my girlfriend. She's really when she produces, she's really about like if it's not 100% I'm super excited just to lead it like you don't want people to be like man about all your layers. If you're willing to go man and keep it. You're going to be putting that out a bunch of men. So just going. Okay? I'm not that excited. I gotta delete it. Keep trying harder. Something I read recently, It's either Fuck, yeah, Yeah, that's how really, she says. I mean, it's like it's either fuck yes or fucking. No, I mean you want to. What do you want to give everyone? Or what do you want to hear when you play your own music? A bunch of like, That's pretty good. I mean, come on, you're here. You have the opportunity to change it before you save and export it. Make sure it's like something you're really excited about or something you really get a response out of. So and what do you do, like with songs that you come back to the next day? And it just doesn't sound. It's awesome, as you thought it did the day before. You go back and rework it, or do you kind of start fresh light? Sometimes I'll do either one sometimes, and when do you know when to abandon and when to rework? How do you draw the unconscious? Almost where I'm feeling? Like sometimes It's nice to go back to those and just mute the part that's throwing you off mute. It does the rest sound good. And if that's the case and you mute that part, that's throwing you off and the rest sounds okay, delete the part that's throwing you off stop. Sometimes it's good to go. Try to change it and get it to sound right. I've had that happen where the layer just was throwing me off, but I was able to make it, not throw me off and work good and and complement the rest of the layers. That's tough as an artist, that's really tough, like that's what you have to kind of over time. Develop is the mentality of, well, that needs to just go like there's sometimes an analytical component of like. I have tried to rework that for three days. Now let's just get rid of it, you know, or you mute it and you really hear potential without it. That's another reason to get rid of it. It's just hard to say that's the thing. It's really hard to articulate a lot of these scenarios. Yeah, you're you're just knowing when to call it quits on certain things that gets developed over time. And it also comes with, like, putting out music and then listening to it after and be still being kind of perfectionist, like, I'll listen to stuff from when I was younger with my other brands that I had. Well, I can't believe that sounded okay, and I just put that out like it just doesn't sound okay, Um, yes, being honest with yourself so you can grow and get even better and better again, The attachment. Sometimes. Like my older music, I realized well, I kept it because I liked it. I felt proud about it, but don't be so attached to its just a noise you made. But at the time, it might have been the best thing you have ever created. And, yeah, as as a kid, you know, when you're making that first song, it's precious, you know, and that's I think that's a masterpiece of a first song. Yes, yes, and that's the introspective aspect of music is going well. Sometimes you think you're making good things that are good. That's deep like you had. Sometimes I had an emotional reaction to us. Think I made and later I went. It's just it's out of key, like that's not even in key or something. So tuning your mind to it's just crazy. It goes both into yourself and into your and then back out into the world. It's cool to watch that evolve, and you just can't hold on to much. You gotta just keep moving forward and making honest music and try to have fun. I think at the end of the day, but it is an art to choose what to keep and want to get rid of. And there's not always a why, like because your brain is going to know why. Because you're doing like you're doing like a You know, if you're going to hit delete on your keyboard, analytical part of your brain is going to start asking questions, and it's part of the artist just turning it off and not caring. If it leads to things like in life, you really want to ask questions. Why are you turning right? That's important with music. It's not as important to have that analytical component, and the creative part of the process is really important to know. Maybe I don't care maybe there's no good medical reason. Maybe I don't care. It's like swimming until you find this warm water. I guess you're like Okay. No, this just feels right. I can't even break it down intellectually. Why this sounds Writer feels right. It just doesn't know I'm here and I'm gonna try to develop this part of the something more. It was tough because especially if, like, I'm a pretty analytical person. But it almost doesn't serve me a whole lot in music. Sometimes it's really helpful when you're done with the creative part and now you're mixing and mastering and you want to tune it all real good. Analytical brain is amazing at that. You can start to get into the science of sound, and you can start to get it to sound right for various analytical reasons. But you can't use analytical reasons to get to an emotional reaction for me. I can't think my way into that. I have to find myself there and just develop it to spend lots of time in my software and working on music to finally kind of more or less sometimes stumble upon it and then just develop it When I find myself there when you say, like, stumble upon it. Does that mean that you start out the day wanting to make a song and you're not sure what there is to be or do you start out with a pretty clear idea of the direction? It's never clear, but sometimes the slightest blank, sometimes the slightest blank. And I just started hitting buttons and pulling up patches. Start with some sound. What happens until something feels cool? It's really like a lot of subconscious reactions. I'm kind of tuning myself to here and to respond to my brain. I'll just say like, No, that was like, That's cool. That makes like you listen to like when you read a blog post on a song. It's interesting. They have to come up with really clever adjectives. The warm they call things warm, they call things, inspiring the call things this and that, but that those words never quite get it. So it's more like this. There's this feeling you can tune into, so you just start throwing sounds at your brain or I do throw a bunch of sounds in my brain. Something sticks in a weird, subconscious way. That's a lot of times hard to articulate, and then I I try to take it as far as I can without moving it away from that initial feeling. It gave me just stretching out that feeling, seeing what more I can add or change without that feeling going away. So and that takes a lot of being in tune with yourself and finding ways to get back to that mental state when you go to work on the track again and sometimes you can't get back there and now you're working on the same track with a different mental state and it'll evolve because of that. But, um, yeah, it's a lot of weird cues like that. So I'll Sometimes, though, I'll go to like, let's say, I've gone to a festival a lot of times after a festival. When I come home, like if I was just attending, I'll have a lot of content flying around in my brain that will definitely influence the production of my track, meaning things and artists that you've heard. Yeah, yeah, and I usually try to not focus on anyone show. I just try to take all that content and render it down into, like, one and influence while I'm going out and making a new track to try again, to try to as a defense against copying, which is really easy to do subconsciously. And I try not to hold that against artists too much, either because it's really hard to like. Not especially if something is really impressive to you and you responded to it, Why wouldn't you, you know, But to be genuine, I think it's important to at least notice if you're doing that. And so, for if I come back from it festival or some huge concert, there's going to be influenced. There's definitely influence in there, especially if I had a really good time. It's gonna be a strong influence, and there's gonna be things about their music that I was really into. Um, that will definitely find its way into the production process in some way. I think for me it's just trying to boil it down to be more subconscious than anything like I don't want to go in and go. Oh, his kicks are always super like, punchy, like this. I'm gonna do that exact kick drummer like I want to try to get too specific. So if I'm not analyzing specifics in my head, I can kind of sink into the subconscious and just work its way organically into my already the sound I've already developed for myself. And it becomes more of an interpretation of the event than just me making a song like a guy I just saw. But it's in there. I just I try to because to answer your question of like, do I go in with an idea or not? I just go in and try to make music on a regular basis no matter what.
being a drumbeat. You know, once you get the rhythm, how do you manipulate the sound? Or do you manipulate the sound even before put down the midi? Mm, Yeah, a little. Both. I mean, a little of both. I gotta get to a point where I don't hate it. I have to like it a little bit. It's not. Yeah, because I can't again. I'm trying to have fun making music. And if there's just I won't leave loops that hurt my either ears or my creative sensibilities. I just I can't I like I'm doing a lot of clean up as I go, just so I can so I can stay engaged. If I leave things a little too sloppy, I get that. Those vibes kind of go away because it's it's sloppy. I mean, that's something about so yeah, it has to be good enough, I guess, is my answer. And then it'll be on. And then maybe it'll be looping now and I can tune it some more, and it's all really depends. But the key is to make sure I still like. We're saying it has to be something I'm excited about, or it's probably gonna get deleted real quick, so it has to be exciting enough to get on the campus for sure. What are the main tools that you use on whatever it is? A snare drum would be obviously EQ. I don't do a ton of processing on my snare. Really? About finding a good same thing. I really don't want to over process those things. They're really key elements in the song they want. You want to really clean, kick and snare on, but definitely, like typical stuff, rescuing them and getting it right. But not I don't have a whole lot of like, Oh, I always use this excited on my snare. Some guys are like that. Um I think if you find a clean enough sample, you shouldn't have to do too much to make it sound right. If that's going to be better at the end, to start with the best sound. Um, what about tuning on this important? Getting them in key? You don't think to tune your drums? I think that's a big, big deal. Is there an instrument too? They're not a tunnel. It sounds like they are sometimes. But if you hear a difference of a song where the kick and sub are tuned to each other and a different song, whether or not it's like nine day like for me at least to hear that so tuning. And other than that, I don't go too crazy with those. But you do have to find the right sample or make the right sample. I'm glad you bring up the tuning of the digital instrument or the drum because I don't think not everybody focuses on that right like you might Yeah, sometimes you like. This kick just isn't hitting very good, and so you're turning it up in volume. Really, it's just hitting the wrong note. Sometimes you'd be surprised how much better the speaker reacts to a tune kick. So it's just science of like for kids getting into it. I can't figure out or people older. They can't figure out why things are sounding right. You've got to get to the basic science of sound study like mix engineering, why engineers decided to do what they do, not just learning what they do but learn the why about music engineering so much more. You have to learn, but then you're not stuck copying a technique for scenario. Now you know why you would use a certain technique and you can become an audio engineer. You just I'm not. I'm not going to come in and say I'm like a professional audio engineer. But by studying the why of audio engineering, you'll it's That's the key, because I'll see people watched tutorials, how to make a kick fat or how to, and you'll learn some of the why from a good tutorial. But just study. Why, like just study why they would eat? Why would you tuna cake like that, right? There is a Google rabbit hole that could take certain a whole night. Why tuna cake like that would just encourage new producers to Google. The why on all these different techniques and things, and then you'll become you'll understand the technique from the ground up. You won't just be able to say, Oh, this mixed engineer does this with his kicks, and it sounds good. You'll go well, he mix. Engineers do this with kicks because the speaker react a certain way because, I mean there's tons of because is in there. It's a very sounds very complicated, but that's the trick and it's getting to the science of it. Not just copying techniques is going to be like a long term strategy for a producer.
I used a certain tool for that. That's actually to have a few out in the Colorado area. Sensory deprivation chambers. Yeah, those are good. They're not cheap to do. No, they're not. But, man, most beneficial experience I have is going in there dedicating 90 minutes to doing maintenance on my thoughts and for everybody listening who might not be familiar with the sensory deprivation chamber. Basically, it's water with a bunch of salt. Absence also that you are buoyant. No matter your body fat level, you're buoyant and you don't have to do anything. And it's basically kind of think of like a sun tanning bed if you know what those things are. I've never been in one, but, um, but like like a coffin and they close you in and it's totally dark. Yeah, and I think sometimes people get a little afraid of that. Like the ones I've gone to are more like a huge hot tub with no lid like you just go in and lay down and then the lights turn off your just shut into this. Some are like the pods. Yeah, yeah, those are Those are big, but they're also bigger than they sound like even when the lids closed, usually have at least a few feet. People think it would be claustrophobic, but all the idea is is so you don't hear, see or feel anything. You deprive your senses, you're depriving your brain of any input of the external world. And oh, boy, that turns into quite the reaction in the brain. I mean, like, for me A lot of times, the 1st 20 minutes in the tank is all the different things that I didn't deal with. We are so good at pushing things back into the back of our mind. We get stressed, we don't think about things. We don't finish thoughts all the time. We don't finish thinking about things all the time. We leave things partially dealt with in our mind. And a lot of times I get in there in about 20 minutes of laying in this darkness. I'm like doing speed work of going through all that stuff because you've got nothing else. When you really lay in that tank and you don't feel the edge anymore and you start to not feel your body as much, you realize like I'm just this mind right now and you've got nothing to do but work on it and think about it and let it be what it is. And it's just the amount of maintenance I end up doing in about 20 minutes of a lot of. It's not like I can even take credit for doing it. I'm just laying there and my brain is doing all this. It's so good. It gets rid of all this stuff you let build up for me. I have to, like, speak for myself. This is definitely a common thing. People report, you know, just a lot of things. Trauma. It's really helpful people with trauma to because that's just thoughts that aren't dealt with and feelings that are pushed back. It all comes up for me. I get it dealt with and then the last. Our 15 hour 15 is just incredibly. It's like swimming through my own consciousness like really discovering myself for hours, and we'll usually it's about 90 minute sessions, so I like to do that on a semi regular basis. Like monthly going there, it's clear, like if you're into computers, it's like clearing your browser cache for your own brain things just you come out and just you get more on point with your goals and things get put in perspective. A lot of things bother us that if you really think about it, it will stop bothering you like it's just this Bs A lot of stuff we worry about. So to be an artist, I think you have to be genuine with what your mind is giving you, and part of that is taking care of your mind. So for me, I do that with meditation, sensory deprivation, like going in the woods. That's why I love Colorado so much. I've only been out for our for a few months, but I mean, I grew up in Oregon just getting out, and if you're not into hiking, that's fine. But for me, it's like get out in the woods where it's really quiet and like the sounds I want to hear start kind of starting to build up in my subconscious when I'm out there in silence, looking at things that are beautiful. So it brings me to my next kind of like thought on that creativity, because you can go clear the slate in the sensory DEP tank and you can do it in your bedroom meditating and stuff. Um, but you've got to give your mind space to come up with new things like a lot of artists just are always, always in their software, always in their studio, and I get it like I we're motivated. A lot of these guys are girls really motivated. They want to make more music music. It's just you don't want what inspires you to be a piece of software that won't like. You have to, I think get things from the real world that you can then output through your software. If you sit there out putting too much, you empty this tank. I mean, there's nothing left inside that's inspiring you. Now your output, everything. Sometimes I think as artists we finish getting out what was in our mind. If we don't go refill it with new life experiences and things other than making electronic music, we can't keep making good electronic music. So it's a balance there to laziness can step in and tell you like Oh, bro, you need to do more input today when really you just start being lazy, like that's why I think put up the antenna every day, but also go experience life. Life isn't all about being in a Bolton. It is a that's a fun part of life, really happy. I live in 2018. I can have this and all this stuff, I think, for me meditating. But then doing a lot of non music things to that just kind of put put more content in your mind. It's like doing maintenance on your subconscious is important.
I just go in and try to make music on a regular basis, no matter what. Do you have a schedule, or do you have a target that you aim for? I mean, I end up almost every day. I end up working on music no matter what, just because that's really what I just like to do. I mean, I do other things for fun. Don't get me wrong. I mean, I love going out in the mountains a lot and and and playing video games just like anyone else. But, um, just like naturally, it's usually a daily for me to work on something. I think it's important almost every day for most artists just to try. Just get in that space, try to get used to deciding to just try to be creative. I think you can. I don't think you can force creativity like if you sit down and you get in there and you're trying and you're putting yourself in front of your tools and you're doing your best to stimulate your mind into that and nothing's going, then that's that is what it is. But you make yourself get to there and behind the tools in progress to give yourself a chance for things to flow easily. And then if they don't cut it off? Yeah, I have a weird analogy coming up in my head right now. Let's go with, uh what is this? It was like those guys who would scan the universe for alien transmissions. Okay, It's okay. Imagine creative flow state as like a random thing in the air like a radio signal. And you have to just put the antenna up and turn it on and scan through the frequencies, or you're never going to catch it with electronic music or any music. If you're going to, like, take something from this wild part of our consciousness, we can't understand creativity. You know, we don't understand it. Brain scientists don't have the faintest clue why we're creative or why we paint. They don't know. It doesn't do anything to help us survive as a species. So if you're going to engage with that, you have to at least give your brain a chance to try to soak some of that up. And for me, it's like getting into my software, my tools. Sometimes there's meditation involved, like I'm big into, like mindfulness meditation, trying to breathe and remove all the survival type thoughts going through my head. Bill's job, whatever. None of us can help you be creative meditating back to just being there, being present. Have your antenna on, really, you know. And you might never get a signal from another alien race, but or you might like for me if I just turn on that antenna enough, I end up getting something. Quite often you get it more than you than you'd expect if you just get into that space and when do you turn on the antenna? Is it a consistent time of day? No, I mean for me. It's usually the evening, honestly, just because of like the schedule of my job, like it's a pretty normal, like 9 to 5 workday, you know, through the week. So it's evenings. Also, when I was a kid event, like just in the summer, it was the evenings because everyone would be in bed like not as many people calling or talking to you. So, like late at night, sometimes I've noticed a lot of electronic musicians become major night owls because two or 3 a.m. you're not dealing with a lot of that like faux mo like, Oh, what is everyone doing right now? It's three AM They're sleeping, Okay? I mean, if it's Friday night, maybe they're drinking, but they're sleeping. So there's no one that you're worried about me. There's nothing you're worried about missing out on it. Subconsciously, there's no work to be done. There's just you in the dark with a computer, and that's where, like good music comes from. For me, so late night. Sometimes there's an interestingly stimulating time because your brain is like got almost no influence except for like, Whoa, we just We want to be creative. We're just here and there's nothing going on. Everyone's asleep so, like late at night. But I for me like the evenings just after work is when I have the time to do it. So that's where I figure if you know any time to turn on the antenna as well, do it now. We'll have time, Um, but on the weekends, I might open a track in the morning. You know, coffee, like when I'm drinking coffee in the morning and stuff my mind is usually a little less creative. I've noticed just because I'm waking up still and because of the coffee or because the morning or little of both and I just drink coffee in the morning just to get up. But it makes me more analytical than anything. Coffee is kind of like a working drug. Yeah, so but that's good to like in the mornings and the days. I'll do a lot more of that analytical type work mixing, mastering, fine tuning, get real analytical about my music, cut out things that I can cut out, Um, doing just a lot of engineering best practices and getting it up to sonic quality that I'm proud of. And that's a trend for me, not not a strict thing of a lot of creative out put during the day when the sun when the sun's out and stuff. But I just can shut out a lot of stuff at night and get down to that subconscious space where the magic happens. Do you feel like it's easier to get into that space when you haven't slept for the whole day or like you're slightly sleep deprived, as opposed to waking up fresh after pressure on sleep? I don't know if I mean, I've I think I've noticed. I've taken sleep pretty seriously for my health. That's been an improvement. Don't. But being a little tired can help. I think I see what you're getting at where, like you're not trying to solve as many problems. When you're tired, you're feeling more. So I think there's a little bit of it of that going on, but more or less it's just for me the subconscious knowledge of like nothing's happening right now. It's late at night. It's like free space. There's just nothing happening. There's nothing you need to do. You're not missing any commitment. Everybody's gonna call you. Yeah, yeah, like, you know, that you're just able to sit here in silence and do your thing if you want, and there's something just subconsciously freeing about it. You're my mind. Let's go about all sorts of stuff when it's later like that
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