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FMP 011 – The Motet – Dave Watts

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station description The Freio Music Podcast: Musician Interviews - Featuring artists from around the w... read more
The Freio Music Podcast
Duration: 50:30
The Freio Music Podcast


Episode 011 - The Motet - Dave Watts






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Overview

Featuring Dave Watts of the Motet, this episo
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The Freio Music Podcast


Episode 011 - The Motet - Dave Watts






Overview




Description




Links





Overview

Featuring Dave Watts of the Motet, this episode is rhythmically centered and packed with useful music industry insights. Dave started the band over twenty years ago and they are still crushing it. They are headlining the world famous Red Rocks Amphitheater again this year. The Motet has evolved over the years and Dave has been driving the band forward with his attentive rhythm and marketing prowess. Dave shares some of the insights he has gained from many years in the music industry that have helped him launch his band to perform at some of the largest venues on earth.

Description

The featured artist in this episode of the Freio Music Podcast is Dave Watts of the Motet. Dave started the band over twenty years ago and they are still crushing it. They are headlining the world famous Red Rocks Amphitheater again this year. The Motet has evolved over the years and Dave has been driving the band forward with his attentive rhythm and marketing prowess. Dave shares some of the insights he has gained from many years in the music industry that have helped him launch his band to perform at some of the largest venues on earth.

Links

The Motet's Links:
TheMotet.com
TheMotet.com/tour
https://themotet.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/THEMOTET/
https://twitter.com/themotet



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just in your hands the sticks hitting the drums. You know, you have the luxury in the studio of playing a little quieter, and it can still be effective, but live sometimes it doesn't work, and also, the drums are different. My live kid is different than my studio kit. So that ends up affecting how I play. So even with that song is taking me a bit to figure out how to play alive and make it feel good. Um, yeah. Great. Now, how do you self reflect when you're when you're up on stage playing? You know, you're saying, Oh, I might be playing too loud or too hard. How do you find that balance, man? I Lately I've been recording every show from behind the drum set. I'll set up my zoom behind the drum set, and which means I can just hear the drums and the bass and a little bit guitar from where you're using the situation. Mike. Yeah, I've got the little capsule I put on there and man, that's a good one because it's very stark rendering of your performance, and it's right behind you. So you get the same picture that you're listening to? Yeah, that's great, man. And it really you hear every nuance. You're every, like, push and pull that You may or may not want to be there, you know? So in the dynamic thing, too. So listening back in some ways is the only way to know. You know what's working dynamically. Sometimes I can be into it and, you know, playing hard and be excited and being like, Yeah, this is killer. And of course, you know, you can't always tell from the audience because they might just be into it regardless. But then I'll listen back, and I got him over playing. I'm playing way too hard on my ride Cymbal playing way too loud on my hats. You know what I mean? Like, something's not working like dynamically. So, um, you know, doing that, recording myself, I would recommend that to every drummer. You know, I would do it at home when I'm practicing, but you only have so much time to listen back some of my home shedding. I just work with a click and try and like, hear what I'm doing. You know, when I'm practicing at home as much as possible in the moment, but yeah, live. It's great, man. Just putting, putting that zoom behind me and then listening back. Sometimes I go on a bike ride and just listen to it track of the weekend show and see, like how things were feeling. That's great advice. I think it's super important to listen back to yourself, probably no matter what you play. If you play guitar vocals, you know you can do the same thing. You know, listen to yourself. Figure out those nuances. It's hard. It's especially in that format where it is very dry and you're you're up front, you know what I mean? It's like it can be painful. You don't always want to do that. You're like, uh, sometimes I'm not in the mood to listen back to myself. My God, I don't want to, like, get depressed right now, but you know, it's good to kick your own ass like that. And once you do it enough, you start to know your own playing enough to where it's like you don't get surprises. You know, I used to be like didn't listen to myself at all, and then I listen to myself every now and then I'd be like, uh, doesn't sound anything like I remember it, you know? And it's true that you don't. It's like listening to your podcast, your own voice. You know, if you don't listen, first time you listen back yourself like I sound like that. Um uh, exactly. So it's like that if you do it enough, then it takes away that shock. And then you can kind of address the problems without being afraid of it and without being reactive and, you know, just like in denial. You know what I mean? You can just be like, Oh, yeah, yeah. Okay. I do that all the time. I always rush that fill. You know what I mean? And you're not surprised by it was like, Okay, how can I fix it? And then when you do hear it better than you're like, Oh, it's better now
mhm. Kind of like that. Yeah, I tried to syncopated a little bit, mix it up and not just have it be a backbeat thing to make it more interesting. Sometimes when you do 1/16 note funk groove, you know, Garibaldi style Mike Clark style. You have the you have the leeway to mix up the back beat. So it's not just two and four. Yeah. Tell me about how you guys created it. How you envision the drums you talk about not being on two and four. Oh, yeah. Yeah. And I think I was messing around with the funky drummer idea that James Brown groove. Um and so you know J. Albert, our guitar player? Just he gave us a demo and he had some just random loop going. And so basically, what happens is we'll send out demos to each other. Um, for most of this stuff, I can tell you about how I brought a song and as well. But for a lot of times, the guys will send a demo and we'll listen to it at home and I'll, I'll play along to it. And sometimes I'll get the guys to send me the tracks without the drums that I'll come up with a part, but just to be as efficient as possible. If we can do that kind of homework, then we walk into the studio. We try and write the song, the basic group of the song as a quartet before we get the vocals and the horns involved. That way, it's more focused rehearsal, so we'll work on the tune. I'll record it, work on whatever groove we've got going on. I'll record it and then send it out to the guys and then we'll say at home and see if it works. What feels good, What doesn't If we need to go back in and and work on it more and try and just to get to feel good, you know? I mean, it has to feel good. There's Yeah, I tell these guys that, like there's no sense in playing a song that we can't play live on a record. I don't want to work on a song for a record that we can't play live
on, uh, on full, fully charged batteries. As you said, So, you know, working, um, in the music industry for so long, You know, you clearly know how to, uh, continue, continue making music decade after decade, and that's awesome, you know, and not too many people can really stay with a single act for so long. And you know what? What would you, uh, attribute your ability to continually evolve the band, but yet still keep the soul of it? Yeah. Yeah, well, I mean, I think having the variety of music, um, you know, the music that we played over the years is definitely kept it interesting. Even changing up the lineup has kept it interesting. So there hasn't been, um, is sort of burnout factor, and we don't we Sometimes we've toured a lot, and sometimes we have not realized very flexible, you know, which is important. And where do you draw those lines? Like, when is it time to go for it for a month? And when is it time to just sit back and absorb? Yeah. I mean, it's it's hard to say and it's really a group effort. As far as making those decisions um So it you know, you can only sort of make that decision yourself, you know? But I think you can tell. It's like, if you're if you're spinning your wheels and it feels like, um, things are moving forward, then, yeah, take a break. But you don't have to be like, Oh, it's falling apart, you know? I mean, you just take a break, you know, slow it down. It's fine. You know, there's music isn't going anywhere. I think that if you look at it like goal oriented and we have to be here with this time and making this much money by this time, then, yeah, you you might end up throwing in the towel when it doesn't reach those goals. But it's good to have a vision, but you don't. The vision is the most important part, not the end game. You don't have to like, get to where your vision you might have seen in your vision, because that ends up being coming contrived, you know, and the vision might give you ideas, and then it gives you inspiration and you start working on it, but you're going to It's going to shift and change you know what I mean? Which is fine. So, you know, I think that, you know, you just got to feel it out, you know, in the in the end, it's it's the music that matters. It's the creativity that matters. If you're not being creative, if you're just if you become a cover band of yourself then you know fuck it, change it up. You know what I mean? Which is fine. I mean, we've we've knocked it down to, like, 20 shows a year. At one point, you know, I don't you know, it's like if we just did, like, two dozen shows the next year, but they're all really good shows. It's like, Okay, every show is going to be different and it's gonna be cool. It's gonna be fun. And maybe in in between, those shows were going to write music. You know, there's always something to do. Being creative is the most important part, you know. And even if we had spent less time, uh, playing as a band, we will give us time to do side projects stuff. And then when we did side project stuff, we bring it back to the band and then we'd have more energy enthusiasm for what we're doing as a band or I'm I've been to Cuba twice to study Bata drumming. That, to me was really inspirational at the time to where I wanted to go musically with the Motet. So, like not playing at all. You know, as far as you know, the Motet or some other side project goes. But doing something else musically, that all leads to a positive end. So I think that you know it's more about it's not what you do, it's what you don't do is like Don't you know, don't spend your wheels Don't Don't you know, push yourself to try so hard to do something that's like it's taking away from your creative energy. You know, that's the main thing. So if there's no way to predict there's no formula, but you know, it's like, you know, as like as a person who wants to stay healthy
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