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FMP 017 - Godlazer

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station description The Freio Music Podcast: Musician Interviews - Featuring artists from around the w... read more
The Freio Music Podcast
Duration: 01:05:53
The Freio Music Podcast


Episode 017 - Godlazer







Overview




Links





Overview

The featured artist in this episode of the Freio Music Podcast is Chris Caligaris aka Godlazer. Chris
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The Freio Music Podcast


Episode 017 - Godlazer







Overview




Links





Overview

The featured artist in this episode of the Freio Music Podcast is Chris Caligaris aka Godlazer. Chris produces some heavy and funky beats that traverse genres and bend expectations. He started out in a death metal band and now drops dubstep on the regular.

Links

Godlazer's Links:
Godlazer's Website: Godlazer.com
https://facebook.com/godlazer
https://instagram.com/godlazer
https://soundcloud.com/godlazer
https://www.twitter.com/godlazer
https://youtube.com/godlazer









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Snippet Transcripts
you. I went to see you. Actually went to see you for astrophysics. Not for enough for music, but for math. But math is music, you know, at the base of it really is. And breaking those rules, you know? Yeah. So did you stay the astrophysics course? So I did. And I loved it. Black holes was my favorite class. Um, it satisfied my deepest questions of the universe. Um, but I also studied. I had a minor in philosophy and a minor in evolutionary biology and ecology. Um, so for me, it was like black holes tells me where the black hole is. Philosophy tells me what's inside. You know, um, science can only take you to a certain point where then you have to experiment in a different way. And I found the electronics had seemed to be one of the best ways to experiment with metaphysical reasoning. Totally, man. Uh, and do you have any philosophers that really stuck out to you in courses or yes. Um, studies. Yes, I actually I actually performed for the philosophy graduation ceremony. I did a song called Metaphysical Understanding, and I brought my full stack amp to the graduation ceremony and I sang a song for everyone. And it was about, um, the great question, the the the great unmovable mover at the beginning of time. I mean, we're talking about the higher, higher consciousness, and in my song, I was talking about whether or not that exists And the question of that. The mystery of it, the unmovable mover, someone who can't be moved someone who maybe perhaps or something. Perhaps that put this all in motion. And, uh, I loved it because they all laughed during segments because I hinted that psychedelic use and what not to try to figure that out. You know, uh, and it was It was good. It was a good time. And I'll always remember, um, that breakthrough personally, because now music for me is this continuation of a philosophical journey. You know of not knowing and trying to know your universe better through creation.
frequency vibrations. This is the structure of our universe. On a superstring theory level, that is everything. We are all just vibrating springs at different frequencies, and the same happens with music. These are all different notes vibrating at certain frequencies, and I don't know if you studies cinematics, Um, but it's the study of how audio waves affect the physical, and you can actually see shapes and designs at certain frequencies that are beautiful mandalas and designs from that right frequency vibrating. And when you break that frequency, just total chaos. So I think that's happening inside us when you emit a certain frequency, I think the cells in your body, the water, everything is vibrating in tune with that and that can can really heal you or or maybe open your body to something you never have before. Some people believe that the pyramids were originally a a way to heal people through sound that that by bouncing these frequencies off the walls in a certain way, would would actually cure ailments. I totally think there is some unspoken magic, uh, there, and I constantly try to see what my music does to people based frequencies can heal I think that's Aaron vice squads. Whole thing is that through base, he's helping heal the masses, and whether they know it or not, their body is they're getting in tune. And that, I think, will just allow us to create more beautiful things, better things that we've ever imagined. And that is a harmony, uh, that extends beyond just music. It's a harmony between people, you know, and that that can resonate across the cosmos, in my opinion.
and and tell me about your belief of music. Bringing people together like is nationalism. Where the end. So again, math language. I mean, I remember one time I had a a cook at a Korean restaurant that I bonded with very well through math. We didn't speak, uh, through English because he didn't know much English. He knew Korean, but we could do math together. We could do a math problem together and get by just fine. I think music is the same way. It transcends our barriers, uh, so that you can communicate effectively without the same language. I think it's a language that supersedes our languages. You know, the music language. And perhaps, I mean, look at close Encounters of the fourth kind. No, no, no, no. That's how they talk to the aliens when they show up. That's the only way they know how is through frequency.
one of my favorite, um, and I'm glad you asked this question, because that's my favorite question. Creative process. Um, recently, I've moved to the mountains to get to Netherland, Colorado, to to get away from a lot of the energies that I was feeling in Boulder and in Denver and front range. It's all amazing energy, but it's intense. There's a lot of it. There's so much creativity flying around. It's so easy to get lost in your own creativity, too. So what I find that I needed was a break from those energies, and I actually went to the mountain and stopped listening to music for a second and start playing music for a second and really just tried to release my thoughts, release all my ambitions, release all my ideas and become a blank slate and really push all my thoughts away. And I went to the top of this mountain, and I sat there in meditation with without any thought in my brain. And there in the silence and the stillness in at the top of that mountain, I opened myself up like a receiver, and this is where my whole name comes from. I believe I'm not a god or anything like that. I'm a god laser. I'm antenna. I receive information because I'm open to it. So I I opened myself to it and I I blanked my mind. And then all of a sudden, melody just comes through straight to my brain Most beautiful melody I've ever heard in my life And all of a sudden I'm just wow, this from nothing. This came this explosion of just the most beautiful melody. And then what I'd have to do is I have to sing it to myself once I get Once I receive that melody Then I sing it, sing it, sing it to myself all the way down the mountain till I get into my studio and play it exactly the way I received it exactly. Not changing it, Not not making it better or worse, Just trying to receive and transcribe exactly as it was received. And after that, I'll take that melody and start building a structure around it, building drums, building this building base, whatever. But I took that melody and I made it a flute sound. Um and and And from there I try to preserve that raw that raw information. And for me recently, that creative process has has led to the best things I've ever made. The best things, Yeah, so is it. Typically, melody first for me, it's either it's It has to be something that can be sung from the heart because that I feel like it's the point of entry from which the purest things come from. If you can sing it, then it's infectious. You can sing it to yourself. You could he
bass, the melody, the voice Get those things down quickly. And then the feeling is, I think, there What about producing music in different types of moods? Uh, do you particularly gravitate towards producing on a sad day or a joyous day or what calls to you? Yeah, you know, emotion. In my opinion, the best songs again that I have are times when I was emotionally charged in one way or another, sad, angry, happy, whatever, but the feeling that you have if you're feeling that so intensely, I think what you can do and it's amazing. And actually, I began making music in a in a way that was very self healing, because I was able to transform the energies that I was feeling into a work of art that then created new feelings that helped me get over whatever I was doing. I remember one time my dad spilled some paint in the garage, and this is when I was living in them, and, uh, he got angry at me. He was really angry at himself. But, you know, sometimes you blame others for stuff that you do, and he blamed me for something that he did himself. And I was so angry. I was so pissed. I was like, Gosh, how could you do that? You're the one that's filled this paint, not me, you know. And so I went up into my room and I was furious. And I'm like, Okay, turn up my my monitors to level 10 Hit my piano. Be no heaviest bass note. I can fucking pull off. Boom! The house is shaking from this B note, and all of a sudden I'm so angry, and I'm getting it out on
choose to work with on stage, right? So narrowing it down to what you really want to do. Because I remember the first time I did a show provide squad and I brought out so much gear. It was ridiculous. And I thought I I got I had a lesson with him. And he's like, Dude, you know, people would respect you more if you brought out less, actually, because being a ninja with your gear, I think is impressive. Like you can you can bring out everything under the sun. But are you going to actually play all those things during the set? I don't know. You might touch it once or twice, but maybe it's just there for show dialing in on what instruments you really need. And then I went back to the bat and I said, Okay, what do I how small of a set? Can I actually make this and turn this into? And he said, You know, you're going to be traveling, you're gonna get on buses, you're going to get on planes. You're not gonna want to bring all this gear around with you everywhere. So he told me, get a controller with some really nice fade knobs, some really quality knobs, some really quality fade, ear's and some quality buttons. If you have those three combos, then you can map it however you want to map it and throw down actually harder than you ever have. And and he used a little zone next to um, But I actually went. I've always been a big fan of of Bassnectar, and I've been a big fan of the of throwing down in a digital way. I've always When I first saw him at the Boulder Theater, I thought, Wow, he's doing this crazy set with this thing that's like the size of my backpack and I'm like, What is going on here? And it baffled me how he was doing it. I thought, How the hell is he setting up scenes? I actually would video him and try to check it out and see what he was doing. Um, and it was only until I talked to, uh, Bill Gates, who helped Lauren change from CD Js to enable 10 set that I started to see the way that he makes sense happen, and I actually got to open for delegates in Oahu uh, in Hawaii and I picked his brain a little more then, um, but it was only until I sat down with Vibe Squad that I really learned how he was doing these New Age shows. And there is a difference between the way these producers are throwing a show together and your normal DJ who's just spinning tracks together. He told me You want to line up the transitions in a way that engages the crowd. You want to find the most engaging part of every song that you have and get that part narrow down, because then you can move through these different songs in a fashion that that causes a breakdown. And everybody knows that when you hear a vocal about, uh, boom right into the one right, that one is so powerful. And I asked Aaron, I said, What works over and over and over? What do you see? That works really well with crowds, Howard and he goes that when you set up an eight bar dropped right before the one with any vocal sample into the next section that people are going to really latch onto that, it doesn't matter if you're a musician, everybody can attach themselves to the voice and so they can They can get it. Boom! And that anticipation is actually what causes music to be so cool because everyone anticipated the boom. And that is what makes your set fire. If you can keep setting up those situations over and over and over and over now, you're just you got you got them in your hand like a basketball and you're just dropping them left and right, you know? And now you're sets gone from Okay, we're listening to your song to okay, we're listening to the best part of your song into the best breakdown into the best part of the next song. And that's how you make these new age shows pop. And after you got that down, then I like to add live instrumentation on the mix on top of the ad lib by ear. Uh, and that makes it live. You know, people gravitate to that if I'm holding a guitar up and I'm playing a riff right before the break, just like the vocal and I'm building that riff up. And then I hold that note right before the one about it at a whoa, boom! Right into that. Oh, my God. Now all of a sudden that amped up that section even more and and that's your ability. As a musician, you can really make those moments count and make. And when you hold a guitar up in that moment, people hold those horns up. They know what to do, you know, And that's your job as a performing. You got to engage them and help them feel that moment more. And then when they're done with your set, they go, Damn, I got to go to that again. And next time it'll be different because there was a live elements, right? And you set it up in a way that you can change it every time. And I do. I change my sets every show. It's never the same show. I could never pull off what I did before because you allow that little live section
little live section. Those live element sections Are there certain crowds that tend to resonate differently? Yeah, And do you ever drop that? And nobody is on the same page. Yeah, I was. I was talking to Yeti, actually backstage at my last show with him at the Fox, and we were talking about the progression of sound and people's ears and everything, and, uh, he told me back in the day when I put a set together, a clear room out people are just not ready for that type of music. But now he says, I can drop a baseline without a snare without a kick, and everyone's screaming their head off where that didn't work before. I think, uh, staying in touch with the layman ear is really important for you to engage people and city by city. Uh, the East Coast, the West coast, Hawaii. I found big differences in all of those scenes, and and I think what Really? Um, what you have to do is know your crowd. No, look out in the crowd, see your age group, see who's there and and then I'll start to tailor my shed. Based on the energy levels based on everything and and again, like I said, when you set up a set in a way that it's always different. Instead of having one set that fits all, um, you have the freedom to do that. I'll play Boulder and I'll play more jam stuff sometimes. Then, when I go to Denver, I'll play hard electronic because that's what they want. And if I do this like Weird Jam section and they lose interest. But in Boulder, if I go too hard, they'll be like, lose interest, you know, because there's a lot of band kids. So every scene, same with Hawaii. When I showed up in Hawaii, I was like, What am I going to do? And I talked to the people that live there and they go, they like it hard and Basie with no lyrics at all. And I said, Okay, well, then I gotta switch up my set for this, Uh, and and again, if you make enough music, if you make enough different genres like I do, I get bored. I make every genre I think I've tried at least once. Um, then you have an arsenal. You can just pull from that and kill any crowd. Uh, which I think is the goal. You know, I I asked the lady. I said, What's really killing it in your opinion? And she said, If you can do everything and do it well
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