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Highlight Clip of Woke Mommy Chatter: Parenting 101, 102, and 103!

From Audio: Audio: S3 E3 Parenting 101,102 and 103! Your questions answered

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station description Musings of a socially conscious black mom
Woke Mommy Chatter- The Podcast
Duration: 04:45
In this snippet from Woke Mommy Chatter, we discuss how to address conversations on race and privilege with your child.
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In this snippet from Woke Mommy Chatter, we discuss how to address conversations on race and privilege with your child.
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giving them important information about privilege. How do you handle big discussions like that? Yeah, well, I mean, that's a really good question. And I would say that, you know, and I've talked about this before in different channels and such. And I always say, you know, speak to your child, obviously, honestly, but also at a level that they could understand. So the way that you're going to speak to a five year old is not gonna be the same way you're going to speak to an eight year old or a 12 year old or a 14 year old. I think that in terms of, you know, discussions that are more sensitive or more fraught, such as discussions about privilege. I think you have to give a very general landscape of what's happening in the world and again, doesn't mean you have to drill down into specifics about you know what's happening in politics and such. But I think that having those open discussions about you know how what Children are hearing or feeling and and kind of building upon that is is a starting point. So you know how you could start. Those conversations could be open ended, you could ask your child some questions. Like, you know, have you noticed any, um, anything that people are talking about at school in the school yard? You know, how is Johnny feeling about X? Y said, do you know why we're wearing whatever In Canada, we were orange shirts, Um, for orange shirt, Day to, you know, underscore And remember, you know, issues that have happened in the indigenous community. So you could start with, you know, something that's occurring in the news or at school. Or, you know, asking a general question about you know, what have you learned at school about about, you know, different cultures, backgrounds, races, religions. How do you feel about that? You know, that type of thing. So open ended questions, I think, are the first line of discussion with your child and questions again that are within the realm of their age. So if they're younger, you could talk more simplistically. But it doesn't mean that you can't get the conversation going because these discussions about race and privilege and and you know issues surrounding it are important. I think the earlier that you talk to your child about it, the better. So that leads into another question that came out of the group. Which was it? Zits. The same question, I guess, is how young is too young to start talking your kid about race. And this person says I have a toddler. So I know. I remember when my kids air. Probably not two, maybe 33 Going on tour, Um, my son in particular, like started to notice color. And that's what questions would be like. Well, why am I Brown? And so how do you handle? Yeah, How do you handle those kind of questions In a way that doesn't make them feel, um, you know, that there's something wrong with them because they're different. Well, you know, I think different is a relative term, and I think that is perfectly fine for a child to ask the question. Why my ground? Why does he look like this? I don't think that's necessarily a bad thing. I think that what we need to remember his parents is that it's how we respond and react to the question that's going to form the basis of how they feel about themselves. So it's a perfectly valid question. If a child says, Why am I Brown? And that person is white or that person is whatever you could say, You know, again, within the realm of what they can understand. Well, you know, there are different people who are born to different parents and different families from around the world. People from this part of the world, um, look like this. You know, people from where we come from look like this there. It's not better. It's not worse. It's just different from each other. But we're all the same. I mean, it sounds kind of, um simple, but it doesn't have to be something that's presented in such a fraught way. So you might wanna, you know, start that discussion with your child and make sure that when you're talking about these topics, that how you respond is in a positive way, so difference doesn't mean bad. So when when your child says something like, you know, why is my skin brown say, Because Mommy and Daddy skin is brown and the child usually looks like the parents. And you know, I love my skin color, and I love your skin color, and your friend Johnny has a different skin color and And he you know, he loves the way he looks to and so to his parents, and you're both the same whatever, you know, like, it doesn't have to be something that, um, is presented as a negative. I think it's really about that. Because that's how the child is going to pick up those subtle or, you know, you know, underlying Hughes or clues that might tell them that different is bad. And it's not Yeah, yeah, and sorry. That has me thinking a lot, a lot, but yeah, that's very true. Um, okay, so
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