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I Believe It When I See It | Todd Cherches

From Audio: [Feature Friday] CEO Todd Cherches on Visual Thinking: The ROI Online Podcast Ep. 100

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The ROI Online Podcast
Duration: 05:11
Todd Cherches and Steve Brown talks about how our eyes are very important when absorbing information and how focusing on visuals would help with marketing.
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Todd Cherches and Steve Brown talks about how our eyes are very important when absorbing information and how focusing on visuals would help with marketing.
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you know, as humans, we have these eyes that are on the front of our heads. There. Tell us. Tell us, Um um, what's the word I want to come up with anyway? Our eyes are on the front, and so they're looking forward. But our brains are so big because we have a unique optimal. Um, our brains are designed to help us see almost the best in all the animal kingdom. And so therefore, we're very centric about seeing, and that's why we say I see what you're saying. Oh, I get it. And that's why we're so centric on this visual thing. People say, I see I'll, you know, I'll believe it when I see it. In fact, in my in my book, I have a whole bunch of I go down, like with common, you know, out of sight, out of mind, right? Uh, Thoreau said It's not what you look at that matters. It's what you see. Um, Napoleon said a good sketch is better than a long speech. Um, every picture tells a story. Um, so the list goes on, right? Picture this, um, Disney. If you can dream it, you can do it. If you can see it, you can be it right? So the whole there's a whole list, so it's like That's the focus to use that word of my work is used using visual C, you know, seeing as a metaphor. So it's it's looking. It's seeing it's noticing. It's watching and basically, um, taking information visually. One of the things someone asked me the other day it's like, How does this apply to people who may be blind or sight impaired? We could still use visual language. So if I was describing the Southwest Airlines Triangle before, even if you couldn't physically see with your physical eye, you can still see it in your mind's eye. And Shakespeare, um, actually coined the term to see something in your mind's eye and Hamlet when Hamlet said, I think I see my father and Horatio says where Hamlet says in my mind's eye, because he wasn't sure if he saw the actual ghost or if it was a figment of his imagination. So when he said, It's in my mind's eye, think about that. We don't have an eye in our mind, but we pick what we picture something and we're not sure if we're seeing it physically. That's the metaphor we use. So in Shakespeare was the one who popularized that race, so it's just so ingrained in our culture. But this really does apply to everyone in all contacts, in work and in life. Yeah, binoculars was the word I was trying to think of there. So you know, when you're leading people, you need to help them see where you're going in in the future, in the horizon. And so you literally have to draw a picture with words with images, but they need to be complementary. And here's the thing that I think is broken about marketing is that we focus on the words, but we don't realize how the visual can be so powerfully complementary and empowering to communicate way more than a stupid sentence. Yeah, I mean again, as we mentioned before, attention, attention spans are so much shorter these days, right? There's so much clutter, which, as markets we need to cut through the clutter. Also think about different mediums we use, like if you're driving like a picture of billboard, right. A billboard, like a good power point slide, is meant to convey an an, an an an an idea in an instant, right in the blanket. If you're driving 80 miles an hour down the highway, you're not gonna pull over and stop to read the whole page of text, right? You might do that in a magazine, but you're online, But you're not gonna do that on a billboard. Similarly, with your PowerPoint slides, I'm sure we've all seen those death by bullet point Power Point slides where people just put up paragraphs or just and then they start reading one bullet after another. And what happens is, well, you're talking and presenting. People can read so much faster than you could talk. Maybe not as faster than I could talk, because I talked about that. But, um, there, while you're presenting to them, what are they doing? They're reading ahead. So they're onto your like, eighth bullet point while you're still on number three. Right? So we need to use our visuals to combine with our words to get our message across. So there's two principles that I often talk about. One is the picture superiority effect, which is a scientific principle that says that if pictures and texts are doing battle against each other. The picture will always win. And one example of that again, for the people watching this on the video. This is the book list from my n. Y u course. This is the same list, right? So it's the same information. But where is your eye drawn in terms of attention, comprehension and retention? Which one is going to get you? You know, your eyes are magnetically drawn to the visual image. So, um, that's the power of that's the picture superiority effect in action. And the other theory is called dual coding theory, and dual is in, too. Is that when you use pictures combined with text that's more powerful than either text or images alone, right? So, for example, would you buy something on Amazon or eBay? If there was not a picture of the item just from the description? Probably not. If someone sends you a link to an invitation and there's no head shot and you don't know who that person is, are you gonna accept it? Maybe not, Right. So if if you have a blog post, if it has a visual image attached to it, you're more likely to read it than if it does it. So those are all just three practical, real world examples of how visuals just get our attention and hook us in right. So again they have to be appropriate. Visuals have to be relevant and relevant to your audience as well, but, you know, just to get more examples of how visuals helped to get our message across.
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