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October 28, 2019 Missouri Botanical Garden New Visitor Center, CalRecycle's Get Started with Composting, Alphonse de Candolle, Kate Brandeg

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station description a podcast about gardening, botanical history, and garden literature
‎The Daily Gardener
Duration: 22:45
Today we celebrate the Swiss botanist known as the father of geographical botany and the American botanist who went on a 500-mile nature walk for her honeymoon. And, just in time for Halloween, we'll learn about the botanist who followed in her father's footsteps to study slime mold. And, we're co
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Today we celebrate the Swiss botanist known as the father of geographical botany and the American botanist who went on a 500-mile nature walk for her honeymoon. And, just in time for Halloween, we'll learn about the botanist who followed in her father's footsteps to study slime mold. And, we're coming up on the 200th anniversary of the botanist who climbed Pike's Peak and discovered the Blue Columbine, also known as the State Flower of Colorado. We'll hear one of my favorite poems about Octob er with the line, "The leaves by hundreds came." We Grow That Garden Library with a beautiful book from one of the country's top gardens: Philadelphia's Chanticleer.  I'll give you some helpful tips to attract birds to your garden over the winter, and then we'll wrap things up with a Scottish garden that is also a living work of art.   But first, let's catch up on a few recent events. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch shared last week that the Missouri Botanical Garden is gearing up to break ground this January on a $92 million brand new visitor center.   It will be called the Jack C Taylor Visitor Center in honor of the Taylor family, who donated the lead gift for the project. Jack Crawford Taylor founded the Enterprise Rent-A-Car Company. Taylor left a legacy of philanthropy. Taylor gave a $30 million gift to the Missouri Botanical Garden to fund global plant research - which is the most significant gift ever given to a U.S. botanical garden. The new Jack C Taylor Visitor Center is slated to open in the Spring of 2022.     California's Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery (CalRecycle) has a fantastic tradition of environmental stewardship.  Last week they put together a great video with tips on how to get started with composting.    Now, if you'd like to check out these curated articles for yourself, you're in luck - because I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So there’s no need to take notes or track down links - just head on over to the group - and join.    Brevities   #OTD  Today is the birthday of the botanist Alphonse Pyramus de Candolle, who was born on this day in 1806 the year Linnaeus died.   He was the son of the Swiss botanist Augustin Pyramus de Candolle.   Candolle's ground-breaking book, Origin for Cultivated Plants begins, "It is a common saying, that the plants with which man has most to do, and which rendered him the greatest service, are those which botanists know the least [about].” Candolle set about correcting that gap in understanding, which had persisted for 50 years. In 1885, The Glasgow Herald reminded readers, "At the commencement of the present century but little was known respecting the origin of our cultivated plants....   Alexander von Humboldt in 1807 said : 'The origin, the first home of the plants most useful to man, and which have accompanied him from the remotest epochs, is a secret as impenetrable as the dwelling of all our domestic animals. We do not know what region produced spontaneously wheat, barley, oats, and rye. The plants which constitute the natural riches of all the inhabitants of the tropics the banana, the papaw, the manioc, and maize have never been found in a wild state. The potato presents the same phenomenon.'"        Candolle named growing regions and came up with climate classifications. Gardeners use them today when we refer to growing zones.  Alphonse Pyramus de Candolle is known as the father of geographical botany, and Harvard botanist Asa Gray remarked, "De Candolle's great work closed one epoch in the history of the subject and [Sir Joseph] Hooker's name is the first that appears in the ensuing one." Alphonse devised the first code of botanical nomenclature - the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature is its descendant.  These laws ensure that no two species of plants have the same name.  The botanical name is always in Latin.         #OTD  Today is the 175th birthday of the botanist Katherine Brandagee who was born on this day in 1844. Brandagee was the third woman to enroll at Berkeley’s medical school and the second woman to be professionally employed as a botanist in the US.   While getting her MD at Berkeley, Kate had learned that plants were the primary sources of medicine. Botany intrigued her, so she dropped the mantle of physician to pursue botany.  Five years later, she was the curator of the San Francisco Academy of Sciences herbarium.  There, Kate personally trained Alice Eastwood. When Kate moved on, Alice was ready to take her place; Kate was a phenomenal mentor.   During her time at the academy, in surprise development at the age of 40, Kate had “fallen insanely in love” with plantsman Townse
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