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Snippet of Brains On! Science Podcast For Kids: Why Do Siblings Annoy Each Other?

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station description Brains On!® is a science podcast for curious kids and adults from American Public M... read more
Brains On! Science podcast for kids
Duration: 05:17
Brains On! is a science podcast for both kids and adults! Host Molly Bloom answers science questions sent in from listeners around the world and in this episode, discover the science behind why siblings get under each other's skin. All facts are checked by experts and all songs are made to dance to.
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Brains On! is a science podcast for both kids and adults! Host Molly Bloom answers science questions sent in from listeners around the world and in this episode, discover the science behind why siblings get under each other's skin. All facts are checked by experts and all songs are made to dance to.
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Hi, Molly. Hi, Rachel and Tim. I heard you were talking all about sibs, and as a professional older sister, I wanted to pitch in. I think siblings are pretty snazzy. It's like having a built in friend you've known all your life growing up together, you probably share a lot of the same perspectives, memories and, most importantly, inside jokes. But I've also heard so many different stereotypes about being a sibling, like how your birth order may affect the kind of person you are. Some people say firstborns are naturally responsible leaders or that middle Children are good negotiators or only Children are super independent, while the youngish are the most charming, right? But here's the truth. That's all bogus. Turns out your personality isn't defined by whether you're an oldest, youngest medalist, or even if you have any sibling at all. It's a bit more complex than that. We can make some generalizations about older siblings and younger siblings, but there's such rich differences between families. That's Dr Holly Rekia. She teaches education at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada. I think the best way to capture that is to really see what's going on in terms of how kids are playing together and fighting and teaching each other and all these sorts of things. She studies how kids learn and develop, and she's done a lot of research on how siblings interact. So one thing that is interesting about sibling relationships, in contrast to many other close relationships that we have with people in our lives, is that their combined by both complementary and reciprocal features complimentary meaning. You help one another out. For example, Older siblings are more likely to teach their younger siblings or take on more of a caregiving rule, kind of like when Rachel helped him figure out the bus at his new school. On the other hand, younger siblings are more likely to imitate their older siblings. It's similar for me and my younger brother, You see, I am six years older than him, so growing up we weren't very competitive, mainly because we were always at really different stages in our life. Well, I was off riding my bike. He was still learning how to walk, which made it really unfair if we ever tried to race each other. So we had more of a complementary relationship, But siblings closer in age may have more of that reciprocal relationship. We can think of relationships as having reciprocal features when people there's a back and forth and people share similar roles. And we see a lot of that with siblings, where the way they're like playmates and friends, that they spend time together and they play and they fight. This means they might be a bit more competitive, but that's okay. We can learn so much from our siblings even when we argue. And I think that there are lots of things that kids can learn from coming into conflict with their brother or sister, things like whose turn it is on the TV or whose turn it is to sit in the front seat of the car or who gets like the truck that everybody loves. Really, When kids are negotiating these disputes, they're learning about principles of justice. You know, when do you need to share, like, when is it okay to take something just for you? Because it's a special toy. Playing with your sibling is like the training ground to learn how to communicate. Growing up, you end up testing out what works like teaming up to build the ultimate pillow fort. And what doesn't like secretly putting slime in your sister's shoes? So our sibling status might not determine our personality, but it can teach us some key life skills. Thanks for sharing, Ruby. Thanks for having me, Molly. Now, if you'll excuse me, I have a jam session with my little bro. Catch you on the flip side. Mhm. Tim and Rachel, are you ready to tune into the You ready? Yeah. Okay. Here it is. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. Mhm. Okay. What? Okay, what are your guesses? Who would like to start? I think that that was the sound of somebody like running a tap or like water flowing. Mm, cause I could hear a kind of trickle and pat sound. Excellent. What do you think, Rachel? I think it sounded a bit like water, but also a bit like someone opening a packet of crisps and then taking out the Chris really quickly. Okay, so I have some water sounds, something crispy, crinkly sounding. We're going to hear it again a little bit later and give you another chance to guess in just a bit.
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