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Snippet of But Why? A Podcast for Curious Kids: Why Do Whales Sing? Introduction

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station description A Podcast For Curious Kids
But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids
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Learn singing, whistles, and echolocation clicks with Amy Van Cise in “Why Do Whales Sing? Introduction” from But Why? A Podcast for Curious Kids.
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Learn singing, whistles, and echolocation clicks with Amy Van Cise in “Why Do Whales Sing? Introduction” from But Why? A Podcast for Curious Kids.
But Why is a show led by kids. They ask the questions and we find the answers. It’s a big interesting world out there. On But Why, we tackle topics large and small, about nature, words, even the end of the world. Know a kid with a question? Record it with a smartphone. Be sure to include your kid's first name, age, and town and send the recording to questions@butwhykids.org!
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Wow. Wow, this'd is. But why a podcast for curious kids? I'm Jane Lindholm if you've been listening to. But why? For a while you already know how things work. But if you're new to our show, let me fill you in. Melody Boudette and I make this show at Vermont Public Radio, but you're the ones who determine what topics we tackle. Kids all over the world send us questions. This week we've heard from kids in the United States, Rwanda, the Philippines, Canada, Australia, and that's just a few of them. We take your questions and we see if we can answer them and we find other people usually adults, but not always, who have a lot of knowledge or expertise to help answer your questions. We'll tackle anything you want. There's no topic that's off limits, and we'll tell you at the end of the episode how to send your own question. If you're interested in our most recent episode before this one, we answered questions about a really big topic. Well, I guess they were more regular sized questions about really big animals whales that drumming sound is actually a gray whale. We covered a lot when it comes to these huge aquatic mammals. But as we told you in that episode, there was one big topic we didn't get Thio, and that's how whales communicate. Hello, I am Dominic and I am eight years old. I live in Blues Creek, North Carolina, and my question today is how do well sing goodbye. What you're hearing right now is the sound of a humpback whale singing. We'll talk a little bit more in this episode about why some whales sing and which ones it is that do it because they don't all communicate in that way. All of the whale sounds you'll hear in today's episode come from the Whale Acoustics Laboratory at Scripps Institution of Oceanography or from the Fisheries Department at Noah, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And to help us better understand why and how whales talk or communicate. We called up someone who wanted to learn more about whales ever since she was a kid, and now she gets to do it for her job. My name's Amy and I study whales, how whales communicate, how they travel and socialize and what that means for them and their families. On an evolutionary timescale. That sounds like the best job ever. It pretty much is. I love it. I was one of those typical kids who wanted to be a whale biologist when I was seven and I just I got lucky. I stuck with it, you know, it was a combination of stubbornness and just being in the right place at the right time, and I ended up here. Here technically is Noah Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, Washington in the United States, and Amy is Amy Van SISE. She's a marine biologist. As Amy said, part of her work is studying how whales communicate and what their communication means. In a little while, she's going to tell us about the specific kind of whale whose language she studies, but we asked her first to help us understand how whales make sound. More generally, the way that they produce sounds is really similar to the way humans produce sounds than any other mammal. So in humans we have what's called a larynx and our throats, and that larynx has a bunch of vocal folds, and we push air through those vocal folds and it makes them vibrate and flap around. And those vibrations air what produces sound. And that's essentially what sound Issa's vibrations traveling through the air
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