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Snippet of Crackpot Cocktail Hour: EVENT: Fukushima Daiichi Disaster

From Audio: EVENT: Fukushima Daiichi Disaster

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station description A podcast for the strange and unusual.
Crackpot Cocktail Hour
Duration: 10:09
The Fukushima Disaster occurred when a 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck just off the coast of Japan, triggering a tsunami wave of over 46 feet high, killing thousands. Unfortunately, this affected the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, causing the only other INES level 7 nuclear event besides Chernobyl.
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The Fukushima Disaster occurred when a 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck just off the coast of Japan, triggering a tsunami wave of over 46 feet high, killing thousands, collapsing cities, and washing entire villages away. Unfortunately, the mass power outages affected the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, causing an INES level 7 disaster, the only other level 7 nuclear event besides Chernobyl.
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when the earthquake occurred off the coast of Japan at 2. 47. Just a minute later. Now the plan is actually properly named Fukushima Daiichi. Okay, This power plant was cut off from the national grid as a result of the earthquake. When this happened, when there were diesel engines that were hooked up to reactors. So reactors one through three were still active at this time, four through six. The final reactors were currently undergoing maintenance, so they were not active. But once this jostling happened from the earthquake, diesel backup generators kicked in as the reactors main processes shut down. Okay, so they had, like, a system in place to like they have backup generators. For if something like this happened where they were off the grid. Exactly. So shaking happens. Grid gets cut off the second the shaking happens before they even know they're cut off from the grid. The diesel generators, like we're here, we're gonna start working. Okay, So, uh, now the generators, all they do is they pump water through the reactors to keep them cool. So again, no water, they'll overheat. Okay? We don't want that here. So what happens is as they're pumping water in the water generates steam, and as that pressure builds up, a valve will release to let off all that steam. And then it will close back up again. Water will get pumped back through, and so it will kind of routinely open up and just, like let off steam while it's pumping water in. Now again, these rods aren't being maintained anymore, so they're still going to be hot even though they've been extracted. They're not going to be at the point where they're going to continue to nuclear fission, but they're still very, very hot. So at 3 27 PM, the first tsunami wave hits and the wall, the seawall that's surrounding the area it holds. So Whoa, Hey, that's awesome! I wasn't prepared for that. So at 3:30 p.m. The water and the hot rods are continued to generate steam. The steam is releasing periodically to relieve the pressure, and the process is still uninterrupted. But the steam is getting hotter, and no one seems to know this at this time. At 3 38 a single generators shuts down. Remember, they have generators for all of them, but one of the generators shuts down, but the others are continuing to function. Okay, but here's the thing. All but one of the remaining generators that are functioning are underground, and another tsunami wave is approaching. Oh, no. So remember with the news reports said they were anticipating a 6 m tsunami wave. Yeah, Well, at 3. 46 PM, a 14 m tsunami wave hits the 5.7 metre high seawall surrounding the facility. Oh, God. It immediately floods absolutely everything that hops the wall. It covers the entire grounds and the waterlogged subterranean generators shut down. Oh, my God. So with the generators down, they can no longer pump water. And there is no electricity, and the heat is rising. And as I put my notes, the fucker re begins. I'm Googling 14 m because I want to understand that in feet because stupid American, 45 ft, 11 inches, 40 6 ft. Yeah, and the seawall was only like, five meters. Yeah, Yeah, that's, like 4.5 basketball hoops tall. Oh, my God. Okay. Yikes. So at four o'clock, Japan is preparing for their impending doom. All vulnerable nuclear power plants are surveyed, including Fukushima, but at this time. No radiation levels are detected, but all plants have been shut down as a safety precaution. So at six o'clock, water plus hot rods equals evaporation. This means that as the water is burning off, they don't have as much water to refill it. Because the rest of plants down, they don't have turbines going. They don't have it turning back into regular water running out of that cooling system. Exactly. But as the water is burning off, that means the water levels inside are dropping. So at this point at six o'clock p. M Japanese time, the tops of the rods in reactor number one are starting to poke out. That's okay. Yeah, you mentioned that. All right. No water equals No, he containment equals Oh, shit. You're gonna have a bad time. You're gonna have a bad sigh. God. So at 6:18 p.m. Emergency backup power on reactor one is restored. Yeah, water moves back into the containment. That's all. But the workers do not realize how much steam has built up inside reactor one. So they're like, Yeah, water's going back in, but they don't realize that the rods are poking out and how much steams in there at 702 p. M. Japanese Prime minister. So I'm actually before I say this. One of things that I've learned about Japanese culture is that they say the family name before the first name. So a lot of people get confused because it's a very, uh, it's very common in Asian cultures. So people will be like Kim Jong Un and then Kim Jong Il. Why is that? We're going to be named Kim Kim's The last name Jong Jong Il? Are there proper names? So all these articles had the names of these individuals in Japan listed the way America does it with their personal name, followed by their family name. I've flipped that right? Yeah, that makes sense. That's like, Yeah, that's that's a weird choice for them to make. Yeah, I think it's just so because most of the English speaking world and most Westernized world we do it the other way around, and so just so everybody else can understand. I digress. Okay, so at 702 Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Khan declares a Japanese nuclear emergency, though there's been no explosion or known meltdowns at this time, he insists. This is entirely a precautionary measure as the situation of balls so they know, you know, we have some power plants that are, you know, in the shit we know we have one underwater. Nothing's happened yet, but just to be safe. So at 7 30 PM, water burns off from reactor one and has left the rods at least partially exposed due to the extreme heat and without water to regulate it, the rods begin to melt down into the base of the reactor. Oh, that's it's like a literal meltdown. That's like, What? Why, That's called that? Yeah, and I don't know exactly who coined this phrase, but I really liked it, so I had to put it in my notes. It was described as a quote molten slag heap of radioactive metal who that isn't like the gnarliest most dangerous sounding thing. That's gonna be the name of my metal album. I love it. Yeah, so then, at nine o'clock PM, everyone starting to wonder who's working inside is this Chernobyl two point oh, workers find religion mandatory. Evacuation is called for a two mile radius surrounding Fukushima people, up to 6.2 miles away are told they can stay home, but they should prepare to leave. Wow, Factor one is now twice the normal pressure level. Recognizing the danger, older workers voluntarily take the place of younger employees and their twilight years. They're willing to take on the horrific effects of radiation rather than subject. Young man, who is just beginning his life. Wow, that's, like, pretty incredible. Yeah, And we talked about this in the previous episode of the effects of radiation poisoning and the three people who died because of the demon corner, including slowed in. They died about 20 years. Plus, after being exposed, and some of them had horrific deaths. One had a plastic anemia, one had a heart attack. So these people are understanding that we may not be sick and die right now, but in 20 years, when it hits me, I could be, you know, like, 70 years old. Yeah. And like, there's something really, I don't know meaningful to me about, like, the informed consent of that. Because, like, we didn't really know what radiation did back, like, way before, you know, like, but we did in 2011. Yeah. They signed up knowing what was going to happen to them exactly. So then Saturday, March 12. That brings us up to the next day. Okay. At 2:44 a.m. Reactor three's backup generator has run out of power, and water can no longer be pumped in. So now reactor 12 hours later. Yeah. So now reactor one and Reactor three are starting to feel it. At 4:15 a.m. The fuel rods in reactor three are beginning to be exposed. And there's still people working there. Yeah, so at 5:30 a.m. Reactor three is critically over pressured and decaying aboard of nuclear experts agree to try a risky maneuver. So elsewhere in Japan there they've put together a board of experts and they're like, Well, what can we do to try to save this? What's going on at Fukushima? And so they decide they're going to try this risky maneuver. If it works, it could save the day. If it doesn't work, it could blow it up. But if they don't try it, it could blow up anyway. So it's kind of like we have to try this, because what choice do we really have? Yeah. And so The big question that they have right now is the heat caused by the build up may have caused an excess of hydrogen. And as we know, thanks to the Hindenburg, hydrogen is highly flammable. So there's a chance that if they vent it, even though they don't have water in their all that hydrogen once it gets into the oxygen rich atmosphere like night. So they were they were they decided they have to do this high risk maneuver because otherwise everything is certainly going to go bad. Yeah, it's gonna go bad if they
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