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Snippet of Gardenerd Tip of the Week: Bare Fruit Trees with Christy

From Audio: Bare Root Fruit Trees with Christy

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station description Organic Gardening Tips and Tidbits
Gardenerd Tip of the Week
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Listen now to an Audio Snippet of “Bare Fruit Trees with Christy” from Gardenerd Tip of the Week. Now is a great time to pre-order these items for your garden. 3 tips for growing.
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Listen now to an Audio Snippet of “Bare Fruit Trees with Christy” from Gardenerd Tip of the Week. Now is a great time to pre-order these items for your garden. 3 tips for growing.
The Gardenerd Tip of the Week is your one-stop shop for organic gardening tips and tidbits. Seasonal, organic, and fun advice for your urban farm, homestead and garden. We cover Sustainable living, vegetable gardening and more. Celebrate your passion for gardening with a sense of humor.
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it's november and it is the perfect time to order or pre order, I should say, bare root fruit trees and perennial vegetable crowns from seed catalogs. First of all, what is bare root, What does that mean? Well, a bare root fruit tree is sold in its dormant state and without soil. So it is, it comes to you looking like a stick or a dead ball of roots. That's what crowns look like. And they will um they will pretty much look that way until you plant them out, and then they will start to leaf out once dormancy breaks. Why are bare root fruit trees better than buying potted plants at the nursery? Well, most of the time nurseries are limited in the amount of variety, the diversity, the biodiversity that they can supply. So when you go to a nursery, you may only find two or 3 different varieties of a peach tree or a plum or a nectarine or avocado or whatever. But a seed catalog is going to have a lot more varieties available. And they are also less expensive because they're sold in a dormant state, which means they're very lightweight. And you can box up up to 10 varieties in one box. So you can start an entire orchard with one shipment instead of having to have trees that are planted in soil and are very heavy delivered to your house. And the varieties that are available online or through specialty specialty organizations like rare fruit growers of California, for example, allow you a chance to try out something you might not even see at your nursery ever. So it's a great time to explore what's available for you in your area and take the plunge. Typically the timing for ordering Beirut fruit trees is ordering in october and november. They're usually delivered depending on where you are, where your zip code is and your hardiness zone, any time between december and early spring and you plant your trees when you receive them. If your ground hasn't frozen over, if your ground freezes over, they're not going to ship it to you until you're your last frost most likely when you're able to dig in the ground. So let's talk about how to choose varieties because there is a skill to this and there are a couple of things you need to know before you make a choice because I know I hear from a lot of people, they all want to grow honey, crisp apples, well, honey crisp apples only grow in places where they get, you know, 600- 800 chill hours. And here in southern California and other places that are coastal, we don't get those hours. So you need to know what chill hours are. First of all, a chill. Our is technically temperatures where nighttime temperatures during the winter fall below 45 degrees or temperatures in general, trees require a certain amount of chill in order to break bud and fruit the following spring if you plant a tree that has higher chill requirements than you have in your location, you may get leaves but never any fruit. So it's really worth doing the research to make sure you're getting the right tree for your area. For example, where I live here in coastal Los Angeles, we need as low chill as you can get because there are Some years where we don't even get 150 chill hours. We usually by fruit trees that need 150-3 100 on the low side, 500. If you live in a have a micro climate 500 is the maximum for low chill hours that I would go if you can get lower than that, that's better. I have to fruit trees in my yard that Are both 500 chill hours, one of them does great because it's in a micro climate up against the wall where it gets morning shade, so it gets more chill than the one that I have planted out front that is in full sun. The one out front never produced anything. The one in back gets fruit every year. So it's important to observe your micro climates on your property to see what's gonna work for you, I ended up changing out that front tree by the way to a lower chill fruit tree, that's lower than 300 chill hours now, if you live in northern climates or places that gets no, this is not a concern for you, you are going to get between 800 and 1000 chill hours a season. And so those are the places where you can grow pears with these apples with ease and a lot of stone fruits that require higher chill cherries. Also, those are all things that require more chill hours. But if you live in coastal climates and you don't know your chill hours, you can always grow figs because they don't, they don't really have a chilling requirement very little at all now. So that's chill hours. You can look up your chill hours or what's regular or historic for your weather in your area by typing in chill hours and your zip code and you may be led to a couple of university web sites that are tracking that kind of information and you can base your purchases on that information and move ahead from there. The next thing you want to be aware of is bearing times, you want to choose fruit trees that produce fruit at different times than all the other fruit trees in your yard so that you have a succession of fruit throughout the year if possible, or at least through the growing season instead of having everything show up at once. So if possible, she was an early variety of a peach, a mid season variety of a plum and a late season variety of a nectarine and you'll have a longer harvest period then you would, if you planted all of the same varieties that produce at the same time. And of course the third factor is flavor, grow what you like to eat. Don't pick something that's just interesting because it's interesting growth because at least most of your family members want to eat it because otherwise you're gonna end up with a kumquat tree out front that only one person likes to eat. I'm just saying, and we pulled it and put in a tangerine. Knowledge is power.
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