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Deep Dive: Black Holes

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Enjoy these far-out podcasts talking all about one of the most mysterious areas of astronomy, black holes. Listen to astronomers and other experts talk about the nature of black holes and what we still don't know about them. Learn about this fascinating natural phenomenon with this collection of astronomy podcasts. Continue Reading >> Enjoy these far-out podcasts talking all about one of the most mysterious areas of astronomy, black holes. Listen to astronomers and other experts talk about the nature of black holes and what we still don't know about them. Learn about this fascinating natural phenomenon with this collection of astronomy podcasts. << Show Less

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Playlist
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Cosmic Queries – Black Hole Survival Guide You’ve fallen into a black hole! What do you do? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice answer fan-submitted Cosmic Queries about black holes with Janna Levin, PhD, astrophysicist and author of the new book Black Hole Survival Guide.
NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.startalkradio.net/show/cosmic-queries-black-hole-survival-guide/
Thanks to our Patrons Ryan Bariteau, Dan Snider, Shelia Hutson, Austin Cope, Zachary Keirstead, Chris Goshorn, Cory Flanagin, Jacob Lackeym, Adam Albilya, and Russell Konicki for supporting us this week.
Photo Credit: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group/Penguin Random House.
SPACE WEEK: What Would It Be Like To Fall Into A Black Hole? Black holes are one of the most beguiling objects in our universe. What are they exactly? How do they affect the universe? And what would it be like to fall into one? We venture beyond the point of no return with Yale astrophysicist Priyamvada Natarajan, into a fascinating world of black holes — where the laws of physics break down. (Encore episode.)
Interview: How to photograph a black hole Astronomer Heino Falcke reveals how an international science team photographed a black hole for the first time. &#10;&nbsp;See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Why black holes are actually bright. Daniel and Jorge talk about the incredible, ironic brightness of black holes. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com
Journey into a black hole: part 1 They are among the most enigmatic phenomena in the universe, confounding physicists and mathematicians. Black holes pull in the matter surrounding them and anything that enters can never escape. Yet they contain nothing at all. Guided by the physicist and author of Black Hole Survival Guide, Janna Levin, Madeleine Finlay takes Science Weekly on an interstellar voyage to visit one of these incredible astrophysical objects. In the first of two episodes, the pair discuss their target, Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy and the subject of this year’s Nobel prize in physics, and what happens when you reach the edge of a black hole. Help support our independent journalism at &lt;a href=&quot;https://www.theguardian.com/sciencepod&quot;&gt;theguardian.com/sciencepod&lt;/a&gt;
Black holes: to the event horizon and beyond Black holes: they’re dense, elusive, light-absorbing pockets of spacetime that are critical to our understanding of the universe. But black holes are difficult to peer into, so there’s a lot scientists still don’t know. This leaves some room for science fiction to take over. Tall tales of galactic adventure may pair well with popcorn, but they also blur the lines between fact and fiction. To explore what humanity knows—and what we think we know—about black holes, Dr. Alok Patel and a theoretical cosmologist journey to Earth’s closest black hole: the Milky Way’s own Sagittarius A*, approximately 26,000 light-years away. (Don’t worry; no scientists or science nerds were harmed in the making of this podcast.)