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Best Jenny Offill Interviews on Podcasts or Audio about Jenny

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Vurbl People Audio Intro Listen to this compilation of insightful interviews, quotes, commentary, news, and more surrounding some of the most well-known public figures. You can also use Vurbl's snippet tool to clip and share your favorite moments with friends, family, and audio creators.
Jenny Offill Teaser CliFi novelist Jenny Offill on how writing about the #ClimateCrisis gives her hope
Writer’s Voice: Jenny Offill, WEATHER & Ben Ehrenreich, DESERT NOTEBOOKS We talk with Jenny Offill about her acclaimed cli-fi novel, Weather. Then, Ben Ehrenreich tells us about Desert Notebooks: A Road Map for the End of Time.
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Jenny Offill
The climate emergency has been finding its way into more and more fiction. So much so that “cli-fi” constitutes a separate genre.
Novelists such as Paulo Bacigalupe and Barbara Kingsolver (both of whom we’ve interviewed on Writer’s Voice), Kim Stanley Robinson and Margaret Atwood, among others, have written compellingly about a climate changed future.
But what about dealing with the climate changed present and the growing dread about it so many of us feel?
That’s what animates Jenny Offill’s powerful novel, Weather. It features a central character who is struggling to come to terms with what the climate crisis means for herself and her family—and what it means to care for each other in an increasingly precarious time.
In addition to Weather, Offill is the author of two other novels, Department of Speculation and Last Things, as well as other books.
Ben Ehrenreich
When journalist and author Ben Ehrenreich moved to the desert near Joshua Tree National Park, the stark rhythms of the landscape brought him in touch with what we stand to lose in our alienation from the reality of the natural world.
His new book, Desert Notebooks: A Road Map for the End of Time, was described by the Los Angeles Times as &#8220;a hybrid memoir, travelogue and metaphysical enquiry.&#8221;
Layering climate science, mythologies, nature writing, and personal experiences, Desert Notebooks is a stunning reckoning with our current moment and with the literal and figurative end of time.
Ben Ehrenreich writes about climate change for The Nation. His work has appeared in Harper&#8217;s Magazine, The New York Times Magazine, and elsewhere. He is the author of a novel, The Suitors, and of the 2016 book The Way to the Spring: Life and Death in Palestine.
155: Jenny Offill (WEATHER) & Jean Rhys' WIDE SARGASSO SEA Jenny Offill, author of Weather (now out in paperback) joins the Damn Library through the internet tubes. Christopher makes a second drink for the book (after he and his wife Sarah discussed it during one of the early pandemic eps), there's talk of How Things Have Changed and the writing process, and Jenny sends us to warmer climes with her book club pick: Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea!contribute! https://patreon.com/smdbfor drink recipes, book lists, and more, visit: somanydamnbooks.commusic: Disaster Magic(https://soundcloud.com/disaster-magic)  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Literary Friction - Obligatory Note Of Hope With Jenny Offill How do you hold onto hope in the dark? This question feels more pertinent than ever right now, and we couldn't think of anyone we'd rather ask than author Jenny Offill, who we spoke to from our various quarantine locations this month. Her new novel Weather is a sharp, insightful meditation on how regular humans process catastrophe, and while it's particularly about the climate crisis, as you might imagine it’s become weirdly relevant in our current situation too. But listen, rather than bring you a show about catastrophe, we also wanted to make a show about hope. ‘Obligatory note of hope’ is an expression a character uses in Weather, and it’s also a website that Jenny set up with resources she found during her research (https://www.obligatorynoteofhope.com/). So, as well as talking to Jenny and giving all the usual recommendations, we’ll be thinking about what it means for a book to be hopeful, and talking about which books and authors have personally given us hope over the years. So, Pandora: shut that box just in time, and join us for the next hour on Literary Friction.

List of books mentioned that give us hope:
Octavia: The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson; Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid; Just Kids by Patti Smith; Octavia Butler and Ursula K Le Guin's writing; The Examined Life by Stephen Grosz
Carrie: Middlemarch by George Eliot; Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf; Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson; When I Was a Child I Read Books by Marilynne Robinson; Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout; Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo; The People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn; Ways of Seeing by John Berger

General Recommendations:
Octavia: Wrechedness by Andrzej Tichý https://www.andotherstories.org/wretchedness/
Jenny: Fever Dream by Samantha Schweblin https://oneworld-publications.com/fever-dream.html
Carrie: Bad Behaviour by Mary Gaitskill https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/312/312616/bad-behavior/9780241383100.html

Email us: litfriction@gmail.com
Tweet us & find us on Instagram: @litfriction
This episode is sponsored by Picador https://www.panmacmillan.com/picador
Jenny Offill Jenny Offill is the author of the novels Last Things, Dept. of Speculation, and, most recently, Weather. One of the pleasures of reading Offill’s books is hearing the emotional struggles and ambivalent attitudes of very honest narrators.  In Weather, the concerns of daily life and parenting combine with the looming apocalypse of climate change. Both hilarious and heartbreaking, the novel asks readers to think about the mundane ways we live and grapple with our rapidly deteriorating environment.  Offill lives in upstate New York and teaches at Syracuse University and Queens University.

On March 18, 2021, Jenny Offill talked via videoconference with Brit Marling, an actor and writer who has focused on creating projects that offer counter-narratives to the more common ones diminishing women’s worth.
35: Monogamy, Marriage, & Loyalty in DEPT. OF SPECULATION (2014) by Jenny Offill SOUTH PHILLY/SOUTH JERSEY — Still asking the same questions about monogamy, marriage, loyalty, child rearing, father/motherhood, the nuclear family, and work v. “love.” How these questions play out in Jenny Offill’s Dept of Speculation (2014), which charts a relationship from its inception to marriage to childbirth to infidelity, complicates things. Read in sips over the past three weeks and recorded during my CSA delivery route in South Philly (till I ran outta gas), during my route in South Jersey (after getting more gas), and on the way to the dentist, on foot, the following morning. Sound quality turned out surprisingly decent.

New 500-word story 'That Fire' I dropped last week: https://expatpress.com/that-fire-sean-thor-conroe/

Website: http://1storyhaus.com
Twitter: http://twitter.com/stconroe
IG: http://instagram.com/seanthorconroe
Literary Friction - Obligatory Note Of Hope With Jenny Offill How do you hold onto hope in the dark? This question feels more pertinent than ever right now, and we couldn't think of anyone we'd rather ask than author Jenny Offill, who we spoke to from our various quarantine locations this month. Her new novel Weather is a sharp, insightful meditation on how regular humans process catastrophe, and while it's particularly about the climate crisis, as you might imagine it’s become weirdly relevant in our current situation too. But listen, rather than bring you a show about catastrophe, we also wanted to make a show about hope. ‘Obligatory note of hope’ is an expression a character uses in Weather, and it’s also a website that Jenny set up with resources she found during her research (https://www.obligatorynoteofhope.com/). So, as well as talking to Jenny and giving all the usual recommendations, we’ll be thinking about what it means for a book to be hopeful, and talking about which books and authors have personally given us hope over the years. So, Pandora: shut that box just in time, and join us for the next hour on Literary Friction.

List of books mentioned that give us hope:
Octavia: The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson; Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid; Just Kids by Patti Smith; Octavia Butler and Ursula K Le Guin's writing; The Examined Life by Stephen Grosz
Carrie: Middlemarch by George Eliot; Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf; Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson; When I Was a Child I Read Books by Marilynne Robinson; Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout; Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo; The People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn; Ways of Seeing by John Berger

General Recommendations:
Octavia: Wrechedness by Andrzej Tichý https://www.andotherstories.org/wretchedness/
Jenny: Fever Dream by Samantha Schweblin https://oneworld-publications.com/fever-dream.html
Carrie: Bad Behaviour by Mary Gaitskill https://www.penguin.co.uk/books/312/312616/bad-behavior/9780241383100.html

Email us: litfriction@gmail.com
Tweet us & find us on Instagram: @litfriction
This episode is sponsored by Picador https://www.panmacmillan.com/picador
CityLit Festival & Writers LIVE! present Emily St. John Mandel & Jenny Offill CityLit Project joins the Enoch Pratt Free Library in presenting the CityLit Festival - Reimagined: a virtual celebration of the literary arts In an exhilarating tale of colliding worlds, Emily St. John’s The Glass Hotel paints a breathtaking portrait of greed and guilt, love and delusion, and the infinite ways we search for meaning in our lives. In Jenny Offill’s funny and urgent Weather, the foreboding sense of doom commands a family and presents a nation in crisis, and how we weather it. The authors will be in a conversation moderated by Marion Winik, author of The Big Book of the Dead. Jenny Offill is the author of the novels Last Things (a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and a finalist for the L.A. Times First Book Award); Dept. of Speculation, which was shortlisted for the Folio Prize, the Pen Faulkner Award and the International Dublin Award; and most recently Weather, an instant New York Times Bestseller. She lives in upstate New York and teaches at Syracuse University and in the low residency program at Queens University. Emily St. John Mandel's five novels include The Glass Hotel and Station Eleven, which was a finalist for a National Book Award and the PEN/Faulkner Award and has been translated into thirty-two languages. She lives in New York City with her husband and daughter. University of Baltimore professor Marion Winik is the author of The Big Book of the Dead and winner of the 2019 Towson Prize for Literature. Among her ten other books are First Comes Love and Above Us Only Sky. Her award-winning Bohemian Rhapsody column appears monthly at Baltimore Fishbowl, and her essays have been published in The New York Times Magazine, The Sun, and elsewhere. A board member of the National Book Critics Circle, she writes book reviews for People, Newsday, The Washington Post, and Kirkus Reviews; she hosts The Weekly Reader podcast at WYPR. She was a commentator on NPR for fifteen years; her honors include an NEA Fellowship in Creative Nonfiction. More info at marionwinik.com. The Writer's Room is a new Festival highlight designed to engage festival attendees, who are also writers, in an informal conversation with the featured guest authors. Writers LIVE programs are supported in part by a bequest from The Miss Howard Hubbard Adult Programming Fund. Recorded On: Tuesday, March 2, 2021
Jenny Offill on Climate Hope Climate doom or climate hope? Francesca poses the question to Jenny Offill, author of the "cli-fi" novel WEATHER.
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