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Episode 152 - Joseph O. Baker, PhD (The Curiosity Hour Podcast by Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund) Episode 152 - Joseph O. Baker, PhD.

Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund are honored to have as our guest, Joseph O. Baker, PhD.

Joseph Baker is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology & Anthropology at East Tennessee State University, and the new editor of Sociology of Religion (https://academic.oup.com/socrel). He has published research on a wide variety of topics, including different expressions of religiosity and secularity, congregational dynamics, “paranormal” beliefs and subcultures, public views of science, the intersection of religion and politics in the U.S., patterns of deviance and conformity, and penology and law. In addition to publishing over 30 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters in the past decade, he has co-authored four books:
* American Secularism (NYU Press, 2015)
https://nyupress.org/9781479873722/american-secularism/

* Paranormal America (second edition, NYU Press, 2017)
https://nyupress.org/9781479815289/paranormal-america-second-edition/

* Deviance Management: Insiders, Outsiders, Hiders, and Drifters (University of California Press, 2019)
https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520304499/deviance-management

* Fear Itself: The Causes and Consequences of Fear in America (NYU Press, 2020)
https://nyupress.org/9781479869817/fear-itself/

Note: Guests create their own bio description for each episode.

The Curiosity Hour Podcast is hosted and produced by Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund.

Please visit our website for more information:
thecuriosityhourpodcast.com

The Curiosity Hour Podcast is listener supported! To donate, click here: thecuriosityhourpodcast.com/donate/

Please visit this page for information where you can listen to our podcast: thecuriosityhourpodcast.com/listen/

Disclaimers: The Curiosity Hour Podcast may contain content not suitable for all audiences. Listener discretion advised. The views and opinions expressed by the guests on this podcast are solely those of the guest(s). These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of The Curiosity Hour Podcast. This podcast may contain explicit language.
Joseph O. Baker and Buster G. Smith, “American Secularism: Cultural Contours of Nonreligious Belief” (NYU Press, 2015) A rapidly growing number of Americans are embracing life outside the bounds of organized religion. Although the United States has long been viewed as a fervently religious Christian nation, survey data shows that more and more Americans are identifying as “not religious.” Drs. Joseph Baker and Buster Smith claim that despite there being more non-religious Americans than ever before, social scientists have not adequately studied the various secularities, and that the lived reality of secular individuals in America has not been astutely analyzed. In an effort to fill this lacuna, they have published a book called American Secularism: Cultural Contours of Nonreligious Belief (New York University Press, 2015) in which they explore secular Americans’ thought and practice to understand secularisms as worldviews in their own right, not just as negations of religion. Drawing on empirical data, the authors examine how people live secular lives and make meaning outside of organized religion. They address the contemporary lived reality of secular individuals, outlining forms of secular identity and showing their connection to patterns of family formation, sexuality, and politics, demonstrating that shifts in American secularism are reflective of changes in the political meanings of “religion” in American culture.
Dr. Joseph Baker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at East Tennessee State University and a senior research associate for the Association of Religion Data Archives. Buster Smith is an Associate Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Sociology at Catawba College and the managing editor of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion (IJRR).

Carrie Lynn Evans is a PhD student at Université Laval in Quebec City. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Joseph O. Baker, "Deviance Management: Insiders, Outsiders, Hiders, and Drifters" (U California Press, 2019) Christopher D. Bader and Joseph O. Baker's book Deviance Management: Insiders, Outsiders, Hiders, and Drifters (University of California Press, 2019) examines how individuals and subcultures manage the stigma of being labeled socially deviant. Exploring high-tension religious groups, white power movements, paranormal subcultures, LGBTQ groups, drifters, recreational drug and alcohol users, and more, the authors identify how and when people combat, defy, hide from, or run from being stigmatized as “deviant.” While most texts emphasize the criminological features of deviance, the authors’ coverage here showcases the diversity of social and noncriminal deviance. Deviance Management allows for a more thorough understanding of strategies typically used by normalization movements to destigmatize behaviors and identities while contributing to the study of social movements and intra-movement conflict.This interview with co-author Joseph Baker covers how deviance management occurs in contemporary examples, such as bigfoot watch groups and the Westboro Baptist Church. Additionally, Baker discusses how he and his co-author conducted this research using a mixed-methods approach and how the authors gained access to these stigmatized communities. Other topics covered in the interview include what makes something or someone deviant, in-depth explanations of the processes of deviance management, and the future of deviance research—including how sociologists should approach the study of deviance moving forward.Christopher D. Bader is Professor of Sociology at Chapman University. Joseph O. Baker (@ParadoxOfBelief) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology &amp; Anthropology at East Tennessee State University.Krystina Millar is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research interests include gender, sociology of the body, and sexuality. Specifically, Krystina is interested in how LGBTQ individuals experience their bodies and the relationship between gender, sexuality, and eating disorders. You can find her on Twitter at @KrystinaMillar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Joseph O. Baker and Buster G. Smith, “American Secularism: Cultural Contours of Nonreligious Belief” (NYU Press, 2015) A rapidly growing number of Americans are embracing life outside the bounds of organized religion. Although the United States has long been viewed as a fervently religious Christian nation, survey data shows that more and more Americans are identifying as “not religious.” Drs. Joseph Baker and Buster Smith claim that despite there being more non-religious Americans than ever before, social scientists have not adequately studied the various secularities, and that the lived reality of secular individuals in America has not been astutely analyzed. In an effort to fill this lacuna, they have published a book called American Secularism: Cultural Contours of Nonreligious Belief (New York University Press, 2015) in which they explore secular Americans’ thought and practice to understand secularisms as worldviews in their own right, not just as negations of religion. Drawing on empirical data, the authors examine how people live secular lives and make meaning outside of organized religion. They address the contemporary lived reality of secular individuals, outlining forms of secular identity and showing their connection to patterns of family formation, sexuality, and politics, demonstrating that shifts in American secularism are reflective of changes in the political meanings of “religion” in American culture.
Dr. Joseph Baker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at East Tennessee State University and a senior research associate for the Association of Religion Data Archives. Buster Smith is an Associate Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Sociology at Catawba College and the managing editor of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion (IJRR).

Carrie Lynn Evans is a PhD student at Université Laval in Quebec City. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Joseph O. Baker, "Deviance Management: Insiders, Outsiders, Hiders, and Drifters" (U California Press, 2019) Christopher D. Bader and Joseph O. Baker's book Deviance Management: Insiders, Outsiders, Hiders, and Drifters (University of California Press, 2019) examines how individuals and subcultures manage the stigma of being labeled socially deviant. Exploring high-tension religious groups, white power movements, paranormal subcultures, LGBTQ groups, drifters, recreational drug and alcohol users, and more, the authors identify how and when people combat, defy, hide from, or run from being stigmatized as “deviant.” While most texts emphasize the criminological features of deviance, the authors’ coverage here showcases the diversity of social and noncriminal deviance. Deviance Management allows for a more thorough understanding of strategies typically used by normalization movements to destigmatize behaviors and identities while contributing to the study of social movements and intra-movement conflict.This interview with co-author Joseph Baker covers how deviance management occurs in contemporary examples, such as bigfoot watch groups and the Westboro Baptist Church. Additionally, Baker discusses how he and his co-author conducted this research using a mixed-methods approach and how the authors gained access to these stigmatized communities. Other topics covered in the interview include what makes something or someone deviant, in-depth explanations of the processes of deviance management, and the future of deviance research—including how sociologists should approach the study of deviance moving forward.Christopher D. Bader is Professor of Sociology at Chapman University. Joseph O. Baker (@ParadoxOfBelief) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology &amp; Anthropology at East Tennessee State University.Krystina Millar is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research interests include gender, sociology of the body, and sexuality. Specifically, Krystina is interested in how LGBTQ individuals experience their bodies and the relationship between gender, sexuality, and eating disorders. You can find her on Twitter at @KrystinaMillar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Joseph O. Baker, "Deviance Management: Insiders, Outsiders, Hiders, and Drifters" (U California Press, 2019) Christopher D. Bader and Joseph O. Baker's book Deviance Management: Insiders, Outsiders, Hiders, and Drifters (University of California Press, 2019) examines how individuals and subcultures manage the stigma of being labeled socially deviant. Exploring high-tension religious groups, white power movements, paranormal subcultures, LGBTQ groups, drifters, recreational drug and alcohol users, and more, the authors identify how and when people combat, defy, hide from, or run from being stigmatized as “deviant.” While most texts emphasize the criminological features of deviance, the authors’ coverage here showcases the diversity of social and noncriminal deviance. Deviance Management allows for a more thorough understanding of strategies typically used by normalization movements to destigmatize behaviors and identities while contributing to the study of social movements and intra-movement conflict.This interview with co-author Joseph Baker covers how deviance management occurs in contemporary examples, such as bigfoot watch groups and the Westboro Baptist Church. Additionally, Baker discusses how he and his co-author conducted this research using a mixed-methods approach and how the authors gained access to these stigmatized communities. Other topics covered in the interview include what makes something or someone deviant, in-depth explanations of the processes of deviance management, and the future of deviance research—including how sociologists should approach the study of deviance moving forward.Christopher D. Bader is Professor of Sociology at Chapman University. Joseph O. Baker (@ParadoxOfBelief) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology &amp; Anthropology at East Tennessee State University.Krystina Millar is a PhD student in the Department of Sociology at Indiana University. Her research interests include gender, sociology of the body, and sexuality. Specifically, Krystina is interested in how LGBTQ individuals experience their bodies and the relationship between gender, sexuality, and eating disorders. You can find her on Twitter at @KrystinaMillar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Joseph O. Baker and Buster G. Smith, “American Secularism: Cultural Contours of Nonreligious Belief” (NYU Press, 2015) A rapidly growing number of Americans are embracing life outside the bounds of organized religion. Although the United States has long been viewed as a fervently religious Christian nation, survey data shows that more and more Americans are identifying as “not religious.” Drs. Joseph Baker and Buster Smith claim that despite there being more non-religious Americans than ever before, social scientists have not adequately studied the various secularities, and that the lived reality of secular individuals in America has not been astutely analyzed. In an effort to fill this lacuna, they have published a book called American Secularism: Cultural Contours of Nonreligious Belief (New York University Press, 2015) in which they explore secular Americans’ thought and practice to understand secularisms as worldviews in their own right, not just as negations of religion. Drawing on empirical data, the authors examine how people live secular lives and make meaning outside of organized religion. They address the contemporary lived reality of secular individuals, outlining forms of secular identity and showing their connection to patterns of family formation, sexuality, and politics, demonstrating that shifts in American secularism are reflective of changes in the political meanings of “religion” in American culture.
Dr. Joseph Baker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at East Tennessee State University and a senior research associate for the Association of Religion Data Archives. Buster Smith is an Associate Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Sociology at Catawba College and the managing editor of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion (IJRR).

Carrie Lynn Evans is a PhD student at Université Laval in Quebec City. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Joseph O. Baker and Buster G. Smith, “American Secularism: Cultural Contours of Nonreligious Belief” (NYU Press, 2015) A rapidly growing number of Americans are embracing life outside the bounds of organized religion. Although the United States has long been viewed as a fervently religious Christian nation, survey data shows that more and more Americans are identifying as “not religious.” Drs. Joseph Baker and Buster Smith claim that despite there being more non-religious Americans than ever before, social scientists have not adequately studied the various secularities, and that the lived reality of secular individuals in America has not been astutely analyzed. In an effort to fill this lacuna, they have published a book called American Secularism: Cultural Contours of Nonreligious Belief (New York University Press, 2015) in which they explore secular Americans’ thought and practice to understand secularisms as worldviews in their own right, not just as negations of religion. Drawing on empirical data, the authors examine how people live secular lives and make meaning outside of organized religion. They address the contemporary lived reality of secular individuals, outlining forms of secular identity and showing their connection to patterns of family formation, sexuality, and politics, demonstrating that shifts in American secularism are reflective of changes in the political meanings of “religion” in American culture.
Dr. Joseph Baker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at East Tennessee State University and a senior research associate for the Association of Religion Data Archives. Buster Smith is an Associate Professor and Department Chair in the Department of Sociology at Catawba College and the managing editor of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion (IJRR).

Carrie Lynn Evans is a PhD student at Université Laval in Quebec City. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Episode 152 - Joseph O. Baker, PhD (The Curiosity Hour Podcast by Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund) Episode 152 - Joseph O. Baker, PhD.

Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund are honored to have as our guest, Joseph O. Baker, PhD.

Joseph Baker is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology & Anthropology at East Tennessee State University, and the new editor of Sociology of Religion (https://academic.oup.com/socrel). He has published research on a wide variety of topics, including different expressions of religiosity and secularity, congregational dynamics, “paranormal” beliefs and subcultures, public views of science, the intersection of religion and politics in the U.S., patterns of deviance and conformity, and penology and law. In addition to publishing over 30 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters in the past decade, he has co-authored four books:
* American Secularism (NYU Press, 2015)
https://nyupress.org/9781479873722/american-secularism/

* Paranormal America (second edition, NYU Press, 2017)
https://nyupress.org/9781479815289/paranormal-america-second-edition/

* Deviance Management: Insiders, Outsiders, Hiders, and Drifters (University of California Press, 2019)
https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520304499/deviance-management

* Fear Itself: The Causes and Consequences of Fear in America (NYU Press, 2020)
https://nyupress.org/9781479869817/fear-itself/

Note: Guests create their own bio description for each episode.

The Curiosity Hour Podcast is hosted and produced by Dan Sterenchuk and Tommy Estlund.

Please visit our website for more information:
thecuriosityhourpodcast.com

The Curiosity Hour Podcast is listener supported! To donate, click here: thecuriosityhourpodcast.com/donate/

Please visit this page for information where you can listen to our podcast: thecuriosityhourpodcast.com/listen/

Disclaimers: The Curiosity Hour Podcast may contain content not suitable for all audiences. Listener discretion advised. The views and opinions expressed by the guests on this podcast are solely those of the guest(s). These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of The Curiosity Hour Podcast. This podcast may contain explicit language.
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