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Past Daily: Your World and Welcome To It

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Listen to some of the most influential and precarious moments in world history including Britain's decision to join the European Union, The Iranian Hostage Crisis during President Carter's term, and the importance of the 1951 France election, given the context of the Cold War.

Past Daily curates historical press conferences, interviews, and other audio content from archived sources in order to transport you back in time and to make you feel a… Continue Reading >>
Listen to some of the most influential and precarious moments in world history including Britain's decision to join the European Union, The Iranian Hostage Crisis during President Carter's term, and the importance of the 1951 France election, given the context of the Cold War.

Past Daily curates historical press conferences, interviews, and other audio content from archived sources in order to transport you back in time and to make you feel as though you're navigating the devastation from Hurricane Katrina or relishing in your new Conservative Party's leadership in Britain. For history buffs and all those in between, this is your world, and you're welcome to it. << Show Less
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Father Coughlin's Easter Sermon - 1937 - Past Daily Reference Room Easter 1937 – Father Coughlin’s Easter Sermon – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –
April 7, 1963 - Labour Party Leader Harold Wilson Talks About Britain And The New Frontier April 7, 1963 – Meet The Press – Harold Wilson – Gordon Skene Sound Collection
April 5, 1968 - Death Of Martin Luther King - The Morning After - A Nation On Notice. Newsfront – Special report/Discussion – April 5, 1968 – Eastern Educational Network – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –
July 23, 1947 – Postwar Europe – A Delicate Madness – News for this July 23rd in 1947 had to do with the delicate balance being struck throughout postwar Europe, and fears the unity was falling apart. The Big Three Conference was underway with discussions regarding the proposed Marshall Plan and the work-slowdown by Coal Miners in the Ruhr Valley of Germany and the fear generated from France that Germany’s industrial revival would lead to a return to German nationalism. The Communist Party in France was gaining a strong foothold in French society and the concern was the current government in Paris would topple, being replaced by a Communist one with leanings towards Moscow.
The Healthcare Debate Of 1956 – Past Daily Reference Room At the risk of sounding like a broken record and belaboring a point over and over, the argument over Universal Healthcare, Affordable Healthcare, proposed legislation for some subsidized Healthcare are all old issues. Issues that have been at forefront of the American consciousness for over 100 years. And here is another example of just how ingrained the opposition is and how little that opposition has changed. And how even the rest of the world marvels at our situation.

On January 29, 1956, NBC Radio, as part of their “New World” series ran a debate on the state of Healthcare in the world and asked the BBC to participate with their take on it. Representing all the interested parties were Aneurin Bevan, Member of Parliament and Labor Party Secretary for Health, Dr. Walter Elliot, Member of Parliament, E. A. Van Steenwyck, spokesman for Blue Cross and Milton Friedman, economist.

Right away, Bevan and Friedman jump into it. Friedman has a condescending tone that drives Bevan right up the wall and clearly there is no willingness on the U.S. to even consider a National Health plan.
Getting Sick In America – Healthcare In 1968 – Past Daily Reference Room Since the subject of Healthcare has been front-and-center in the media and most conversation the past few decades, it’s sobering to know it’s not a new argument. In fact, the subject of affordable healthcare has been argued since as far back as 1909.

And much has been accomplished in that time. Since 1909, and even since 1968, modern medicine has made enormous advances towards prolonging and even enriching life.

But in the 1960’s, even with Medicare, which was signed into law in 1965, there was still a broken system and a system desperately in need of repair. You’d think after almost fifty years something would have happened to fix it. Americans priding themselves on the notion that, when things are broken, we are resourceful enough to get them fixed – but this is a deal breaker, it seems.

The issue of affordable healthcare has been paramount is just about every political campaign and public discussion. Why is America the only country in the world not with some system of Universal Healthcare? It’s a question that’s been on most people’s minds for a very long time. It was a promise made by FDR in the 1930s. It was put on temporary hold until Social Security was established. It was reintroduced in 1941, just in time for America to enter World War 2 – it was a promise meant to be renewed after the War, but the death of President Roosevelt left it in limbo until President Truman reintroduced it. And since then, every President (with the exception of the current one) has sought some form of Universal or affordable healthcare – and each time it has been met with resistance from the Health Insurance lobby (a now powerful entity that wasn’t early on in the conversation) and the end result was eventual defeat, with the exception of The Affordable Healthcare Act – or Obamacare, as it came to be known. And even though it was far from perfect, it was at least a boilerplate by which improvements and amendments would be drawn and introduced. But even that has been subject to repeal for a number of reasons; none of them good or even logical.

In 1968, as part of its Monthly radio documentary series Second Sunday, NBC Radio explored the subject of Medical Care in America and came up with a lot of very familiar situations. Further evidence some things don’t change, or refuse to.

Here is that Second Sunday episode, first broadcast on August 11, 1968.
Audio of Past Daily: A Governor Named Blanco - A Hurricane Named Katrina In 2005, Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco addressed the media after Hurricane Katrina to discuss the extent of the devastation and what help could be expected. As floodwaters continue to deepen, Gov. Blanco sets up call centers for those seeking rescue requests and other forms of assistance.
Audio of Past Daily: Edward Heath - Britain And The Common Market In this interview for Meet The Press, newly elected Conservative Party Leader, Edward Heath, is asked about Britain's desire to join the Common Market, the NATO alliance, and trade with the United States among concerns that Britain was becoming increasingly dependent on the U.S..
Audio of Past Daily: France Goes To The Polls - The French Elections Of 1951 In 1951, France went to the polls to elect the Second National Assembly of the Fourth Republic — a newly formed political party that resulted in the split of the French Communist Party, the French Socialist Party and the Christian Democratic Republican Movement due to strikes and the unrest from the Cold War. In this highly contested election, over 50% of the population showed up to vote.
Audio of Past Daily: Before It Was The EU It Was The Common Market Before the European Union, there was the Common Market — designed to create economic integration between its member countries, which included France, West Germany, Luxembourg, Italy, The Netherlands and Belgium, but Britain debated over whether or not to join.
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