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Past Daily: Conflict's Greatest Hits

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Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
Listen to Past Daily's curated collection of important historical moments from the 1950s and 1960s, including a live radio documentary six days after the Cuban Missile Crisis and an interview from German Mayor William Brandt shortly after the Berlin Wall collapsed.

Past Daily curates historical press conferences, interviews, and other audio content from archived sources in order to transport you back in time and to make you feel as though you… Continue Reading >>
Listen to Past Daily's curated collection of important historical moments from the 1950s and 1960s, including a live radio documentary six days after the Cuban Missile Crisis and an interview from German Mayor William Brandt shortly after the Berlin Wall collapsed.

Past Daily curates historical press conferences, interviews, and other audio content from archived sources in order to transport you back in time and to make you feel as though you're beside Nicholas Katzenbach, championing Civil Rights to a crowd in Alabama or anxiously awaiting for news of whether or not the United States will go to war with The Soviet Union. For history buffs and all those in between, this is conflict's greatest hits. << Show Less
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July 1, 1945 - Back to Borneo - Operation Oboe - Sweeping Through The South Pacific July 1, 1945 – Reports for this day from two Mutual correspondents via Shortwave on the situation in the south Pacific and the Borneo Campaign. The Borneo campaign of 1945 was the last major Allied campaign in the South West Pacific Area during World War II to liberate Japanese-held British Borneo and Dutch Borneo. Designated collectively as Operation Oboe, a series of amphibious assaults between 1 May and 21 July were conducted by the Australian I Corps, under Lieutenant-General Leslie Morshead, against Imperial Japanese forces who had been occupying the island since late 1941 – early 1942. The main Japanese formation on the island was the Thirty-Seventh Army under Lieutenant-General Masao Baba, while the naval garrison was commanded by Vice-Admiral Michiaki Kamada. The Australian ground forces were supported by US and other Allied air and naval forces, with the US providing the bulk of the shipping and logistic support necessary to conduct the operation. The campaign was initially planned to involve six stages, but eventually landings were undertaken at four locations: Tarakan, Labuan, North Borneo and Balikpapan. Guerilla operations were also carried out by Dayak tribesmen and small numbers of Allied personnel in the interior of the island. While major combat operations were concluded by mid-July, mopping-up operations continued throughout Borneo until the end of the war in August.

The last major amphibious assault of World War II was at Balikpapan on 1 July 1945. The landing was preceded by a heavy aerial bombardment over the course of 20 days, while minesweepers worked to clear the area for 15 days, establishing safe lanes for the invasion fleet to pass and clearing proposed anchorages. These operations were undertaken inside the range of Japanese coastal guns; to protect the minesweepers, naval gunfire and aerial bombardment was used to suppress and neutralize the Japanese guns. Due to the unavailability of the Tarakan airfield, air support for the operation was provided by RAAF and US units based in the southern Philippines. Three minesweepers were lost during the clearance operations.

Here are two reports from the South Pacific, from July 1, 1945.
May 5, 1942 - South Pacific Air War: Optimistic Pessimism - Invasion of Madagascar - First Day of Sugar Rationing: So Far - So Good. May 5, 1942 – News for this day was cautious, particularly with reference to the Air War in the South Pacific. It was reported that Allied pilots were scoring decisive victories in the air, despite being outnumbered by the Japanese. It was estimated Allied Pilots were taking down 3-4 Japanese planes to the Allies’ 1, since the start of the battle over New Guinea the week before. It was a hopeful sign but it was tempered by the fact that the Japanese were sending up larger numbers of planes, with more in reserve and that the Air war was widening and deepening in the South Pacific region. Despite that, the Allies were showing that a victory in the South Pacific would only be possible by gaining an advantage from the Air – it was all a matter of time and keeping supply lines open. For the time though, it was acknowledged that the Japanese war machine had exceeded the Allies, but what was also acknowledged was; even though the Japanese had quantity, the allies had quality and that was a potentially big difference. Meanwhile, an invasion of Vichy-controlled Madagascar by British troops was met with little opposition. The British War Office stressed the invasion was strategic rather than political. It was said that no political barrier stood in the way of a potential Japanese occupation of the island and that there was no obstacle on the parts of the Vichy government to allow that occupation from happening. The experiences with Indochina and Syria (both under control of Vichy) made it likely that the Vichy government wouldn’t lift a finger to prevent that occupation from happening. And so Britain made sure no replay would happen. And the first day of Sugar rationing went off without much of a hitch. Aside from massive lines forming and volunteers helping distribute ration booklets being overwhelmed in some cities, many felt it was a good start. More rationing on the way. And that’s a tiny slice of what happened, this May 5, 1942 as presented by NBC’s News Of The World.
May 2, 1942 – Rumors About Mandalay – The Secret Movement Against Hitler – Pondering A Second Front. May 2, 1942 – Despite weather, it was a busy day on the fighting fronts around the world. From the Pacific came rumors that Mandalay had fallen to the Japanese. In an address, Adolf Hitler warned against the presence of a “secret army” infiltrating German factories, whose purpose was to unionize and call for an end to the war and that there was evidence of a growing resistance to the war by the German civilian population. Many felt nothing would materialize until the German Army started losing badly, and by all intents and purposes, it was as far as the Eastern Front was concerned. Reports from Moscow indicated that snipers were responsible for a wave of mass casualties with as many as 5,000 German troops killed in a single day along the Eastern Front. Other reports told of Russian POW’s escaping prison camps, many with the aid of German soldiers guarding the camps. The reports came from Swedish radio and weren’t substantiated but also indicated in one camp, 20 POW’s were caught and returned out of an estimated 1200 escapees. Bad weather held up bombing runs on both Germany and Britain with some British activity confined to raiding Ports in France and Denmark. And calls for opening a Second Front were getting louder. The only thing holding a Second Front back was shipping, a much needed element in transport and supply for an invasion. The U.S. was scrambling to meet goals and was well on its way to accomplishing the near impossible, but it was all a matter of time, which in some circles there was precious little of. And that’s just a small slice of what happened, this May 2nd 1942 as reported by NBC’s News Of The World.
April 29, 1975 - Vietnam: End Of The Road - The Fall of Saigon April 29, 1975 – Vietnam – the end had been predicted for some time, ever since word of the withdrawal of U.S. troops, and a gradual phasing out of American military support in favor of the South Vietnamese Army assuming the position. But the end of the story was coming – the South Vietnamese government was embroiled in chaos. The South Vietnamese Army was in a state of disarray and demoralization. Continuing a war that most were questioning seemed like a waste of time, energy and life. The end came swiftly, faster than American and South Vietnamese observers had predicted as resistance to North Vietnamese and Vietcong advances crumbled. On this day, events were moving even faster – On April 21, President Thieu announced his resignation, handing the Saigon government over to General Duong van Minh with the hopes of negotiating a ceasefire. But by the 29th the war was clearly lost and Thieu announced that the South Vietnamese government and armed forces had surrendered. But there was still the matter of the remaining American officials, troops, media and civilians and their airlift to safety. A full-on panic ensued as Vietnamese civilians stormed the U.S. Embassy in Saigon in an effort to be on one of the few remaining Marine Helicopters leaving the embassy to safety and awaiting U.S. ships. Because the events were moving so fast and the news was in confusing bursts, here is a two-hour distillation of the events, along with an interview with President Ford by CBS News correspondents. There are also a few special broadcasts on the end of the war, peppered with bulletins regarding the unfolding events as they were happening. One of those nail-biting days in history as it was being reported and observed.
April 21, 1945 - Update On Okinawa - Getting Ready For The First United Nations Meeting. Weekly report on the War in the Pacific from Mutual Radio - Gordon Skene Sound Collection
April 14, 1941 - Situation East – April 14, 1941 – News Of The World – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –
April 11, 1942 - Message From Bataan - Deciphering A Pessimistic Picture – April 11, 1942 – News Of The World – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –
April 6, 1945 – Word From Okinawa – Operation Iceberg Underway. April 6, 1945 – Reports from Don Pryor, Mutual Broadcasting – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –
April 4, 1944 – Raids In The Pacific – Landings At Bougainville – B-17’s Over Bucharest. April 4, 1944 – Alka-Seltzer News Of The World – NBC – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –
April 1, 1942 – Word From The Pacific: Tropical Storms Over New Guinea, Followed By Allied Assault – Australia Rations And Curtails. April 1, 1942 – Word From The Pacific: Tropical Storms Over New Guinea, Followed By Allied Assault – Australia Rations And Curtails.
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