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Aging in Style with Lori Williams

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Aging in Style with Lori Williams is a positive and uplifting podcast with the goal of inspiring people of all ages to live their best life. Hosted by senior living expert Lori Williams, this show provides education and resources on all aspects of senior living. You will meet inspirational seniors, who are aging with grace and making the most of their senior years. Be ready to change your bias about age, reinvent yourself, and live a more meaningful life! Intro voiceover:Welcome to Aging in St… Continue Reading >>
Aging in Style with Lori Williams is a positive and uplifting podcast with the goal of inspiring people of all ages to live their best life. Hosted by senior living expert Lori Williams, this show provides education and resources on all aspects of senior living. You will meet inspirational seniors, who are aging with grace and making the most of their senior years. Be ready to change your bias about age, reinvent yourself, and live a more meaningful life! Intro voiceover:Welcome to Aging in Style with me, Lori Williams! I am an optimist by nature, and I truly believe if you can dream it, you can achieve it. My grandmother’s journey with dementia, ignited a passion in me to work with seniors, which prompted a total career change for me in my 40’s. When I hit my 50s I decided to follow my own advice, and make my dream a reality. I founded my own company, where I use my expertise to help seniors locate housing and resources. The fact is we are all aging, so why not do << Show Less
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092. Residential Care Homes Reimagined, with Hal Cranmer Residential homes are great alternatives to large senior living facilities. They feel like a home because they actually are houses rather than a resort or hotel atmosphere, and there’s often a better ratio of caregivers to residents.
There are many reasons why you might choose a residential home over another type of senior living, but Hal Cranmer adds even more to the experience. Based in Arizona, his residential homes are next level in terms of health offerings and engaging activities. His residents and caregivers are treated as family, complete with “home movies” – like a parody video of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” reimagined for seniors.
Hal joins Senior Living Expert Lori Williams to discuss his interesting journey to managing residential homes and his passion for his career. His care homes demonstrate this passion as Hal and his caregivers support seniors regaining control over their health and their lives through nutritious food, fun outings, and even personal training so they can stay active. Plus, families can easily visit, get involved, and help keep the seniors social and happy.
Hal believes seniors are still young on the inside – and many want to continue to have fun and be healthy for their families. His mission is to help that happen. You’ll get a peek at what the fun, family-like atmosphere he’s nurtured in this unique example of a residential home.
Topics discussed:
-Residential care homes
-Caregivers
-Keeping seniors happy
-Senior activities
-Staying active as we age
-Senior nutrition and fitness
-Types of senior living
-Perks of residential care
Takeaways from this episode:
- You might choose a residential care home over a larger facility because of price. Generally, care homes are priced lower than large facilities.
- Care homes supply 24/7 care, administer medications, and provide all meals, healthcare, and hygiene. They also coordinate different services like home health and mobile physicians.
- In the State of Arizona, Residential care homes are often limited to 10 residents and offer a more family / homey atmosphere. There’s no signage and it may be harder to find.
- Residential care can provide a home whether you’re active and just need a little help with medication, or if you’re on hospice and bedbound.
- Proper nutrition and exercise help improve quality of life in your remaining years. It can help increase mobility and help alleviate chronic conditions.
Resources mentioned in this episode:
'A Paradise for Parents', a parody video by
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OhdjHngV7c
007. What are Residential Care homes, with Jennifer Davis, founder of Davis Family Elder Care:
https://www.loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/episode/783704c9/007-what-are-residential-care-homes-with-jennifer-davis-founder-of-davis-family-elder-care
To learn more about A Paradise for Parents, please visit:
https://aparadiseforparents.com/
For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter, please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/
https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/
https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/
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092. Residential Care Homes Reimagined, with Hal Cranmer Residential homes are great alternatives to large senior living facilities. They feel like a home because they actually are houses rather than a resort or hotel atmosphere, and there’s often a better ratio of caregivers to residents.
There are many reasons why you might choose a residential home over another type of senior living, but Hal Cranmer adds even more to the experience. Based in Arizona, his residential homes are next level in terms of health offerings and engaging activities. His residents and caregivers are treated as family, complete with “home movies” – like a parody video of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” reimagined for seniors.
Hal joins Senior Living Expert Lori Williams to discuss his interesting journey to managing residential homes and his passion for his career. His care homes demonstrate this passion as Hal and his caregivers support seniors regaining control over their health and their lives through nutritious food, fun outings, and even personal training so they can stay active. Plus, families can easily visit, get involved, and help keep the seniors social and happy.
Hal believes seniors are still young on the inside – and many want to continue to have fun and be healthy for their families. His mission is to help that happen. You’ll get a peek at what the fun, family-like atmosphere he’s nurtured in this unique example of a residential home.
Topics discussed:
-Residential care homes
-Caregivers
-Keeping seniors happy
-Senior activities
-Staying active as we age
-Senior nutrition and fitness
-Types of senior living
-Perks of residential care
Takeaways from this episode:
- You might choose a residential care home over a larger facility because of price. Generally, care homes are priced lower than large facilities.
- Care homes supply 24/7 care, administer medications, and provide all meals, healthcare, and hygiene. They also coordinate different services like home health and mobile physicians.
- In the State of Arizona, Residential care homes are often limited to 10 residents and offer a more family / homey atmosphere. There’s no signage and it may be harder to find.
- Residential care can provide a home whether you’re active and just need a little help with medication, or if you’re on hospice and bedbound.
- Proper nutrition and exercise help improve quality of life in your remaining years. It can help increase mobility and help alleviate chronic conditions.
Resources mentioned in this episode:
'A Paradise for Parents', a parody video by
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OhdjHngV7c
007. What are Residential Care homes, with Jennifer Davis, founder of Davis Family Elder Care:
https://www.loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/episode/783704c9/007-what-are-residential-care-homes-with-jennifer-davis-founder-of-davis-family-elder-care
To learn more about A Paradise for Parents, please visit:
https://aparadiseforparents.com/
For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter, please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/
https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/
https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/
091. Replay: Why we are most susceptible to dehydration as we age It’s always good to stay hydrated in the heat of summer, but it’s especially important for seniors. A UCLA study found that 40% of seniors may be chronically under-hydrated, with adults age 65 and above having the highest hospital admission rates for dehydration.
There are a few reasons seniors tend to struggle with hydration. Some seniors may have a decreased sense of thirst as they age, and others may struggle with incontinence and avoid drinking enough. Senior Services Expert Lori Williams discusses the main reasons seniors get dehydrated, signs and symptoms, and easy fixes to stay hydrated and even make it fun.
Topics discussed:
- Dehydration in seniors
- Mobility issues
- Cognitive impairments / dementia
- Seniors and UTIs
- How to stay hydrated
- Water-rich foods
Takeaways from this episode:
- Reasons for dehydration in seniors include medications, mobility issues, cognitive impairments, reduced kidney function, and more.
- Signs of dehydration are muscle cramps, dizziness, dark urine, fatigue, dry skin, confusion, rapid breathing and heartbeat, and low blood pressure.
- Risks of dehydration include falling due to disorientation, as well as UTIs, which can escalate to kidney infection and even sepsis.
- You can stay hydrated by eating water-rich foods, such as cucumber and watermelon, making smoothies, or sucking on popsicles.
- Bring a water bottle with you when you’re running errands and keep a large one with you at all times so you don’t have to refill frequently.
Resources mentioned in this episode:
Drinking cups for seniors with mobility issues:
https://www.amazon.com/s?k=senior+cups+for+seniors&rh=n%3A3760901%2Cn%3A3775831&dc&qid=1625690471&rnid=2941120011&ref=sr_nr_n_2
Jelly Drops to boost hydration:
https://www.jellydrops.com/
To suggest a topic, be a guest or to support the podcast please email Lori@Loriwilliams-seniorservices.com
For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter please visit:
https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/
090. LGBTQ and Dementia/Alzheimer's Disease There are an estimated 2.7 million LGBTQ people over the age of 50. With Alzheimer’s projected to affect 13 million people by 2050, we can anticipate this impacting many members of the LGBTQ population.
In honor of Pride Month, Megan Rowe joins Senior Living Expert Lori Williams to explain how Alzheimer’s uniquely impacts this population. As the Senior Program Manager for the Alzheimer’s Association Dallas and Northeast Texas Chapter, Megan provides statistics and tips on supporting LGBTQ seniors. Her expertise lends itself to educating and supporting families and individuals with the disease and caregivers alike.
With an average of one and a half people caring for one person with dementia, there are many unpaid loved ones helping assist this population. It’s important to note support systems look different for the LGBTQ population, and being an ally involves taking a different look at what a support system might look like and training ourselves with validating language and knowledge.
Topics discussed:
- LGBTQ community
- Supporting LGBTQ seniors
- LGBTQ and Alzheimer’s / dementia
- LGBTQ education resources
- Alzheimer’s Association and SAGE
- LGBTQ and senior living
- Representation
- Ageism
- Pronouns
Takeaways from this episode:
- Caregiving doesn’t always begin with age; it became a vital role of the LGBTQ community in the 1980s. “Caring for our own” is a common concept within the LGBTQ community.
- It’s important that intake processes discuss chosen family or important people in one’s life as opposed to biological family. Many LGBTQ don’t have a relationship with their family of origin and may not have children.
- If you don't collect information on sexual orientation and gender identity, you don't know who you're serving, whether there are gaps in services, and the differences among people’s needs.
- Publicize your commitment to welcoming people of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities. Then follow through by becoming LGBTQ competent, getting the right training, and welcoming the community through outreach.
- Sharing your pronouns is a way to show you’re validating, trustworthy, and support the LGBTQ community.
- LGBTQ people should complete advanced directives and record their wishes in legal documents - especially important for those who are isolated or don’t keep in touch with family.
Resources mentioned in this episode:
2022 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures report
https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/facts-figures
LGBTQ Community Resources for Dementia
https://www.alz.org/help-support/resources/alzheimers-and-dementia-resources-for-lgbtq-commun
083. The true economic impact of Alzheimer's Disease
https://www.loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/episode/29609f61/083-the-true-economic-impact-of-alzheimers-disease
Free online community for everyone affected by Alzheimer's or another dementia
https://www.alzconnected.org/
The 10 signs of dementia:
https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/10_signs
080. The Love Always Project: Your final gift to a family well-loved
https://www.loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/episode/22035ed9/080-the-love-always-project-your-final-gift-to-a-family-well-loved
To suggest a topic, be a guest or to support the podcast please email Lori@Loriwilliams-seniorservices.com
For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/
https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/
https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/
089. A practical guide to letting go, and finding unexpected happiness, with Katherine Esty, PhD Katharine Esty likes to joke that she has “peaked at 87.” A psychologist and activist for aging, she’s also the author of Eightysomethings: A Practical Guide to Letting Go, Aging Well, and Finding Unexpected Happiness. The book contains insights from her interviews with 128 people aged 80+ from all around the country about what it means to age.
Katharine explains how the world becomes smaller in your 80s: friend circles shrink, living spaces downsize, and you even physically shrink. For her it was uncharted territory as she was accustomed to keeping up with her family despite her age. However, her own life and her interviews with other people over 80 reveals that they’re a happy group - even happier than people who are decades younger.
She and Senior Living Expert Lori Williams discuss:
-Making accommodations and adaptations as we age
-Finding happiness (and purpose!) as we age
-The 5 types of people coping with health issues
And more.
It’s easy to hold on to the past and memories of who you were before aging. However, when you finally let that go, there’s another side to it – a worthwhile, wonderful life full of new possibilities. And it’s never too late to find pleasure in new things or find a new purpose.
Topics discussed:
-Turning 80
-Attitudes around aging
-Embracing change
-Downsizing / senior housing
-Retirement
-Finding purpose as we age
-Senior happiness
-Staying social as seniors
Takeaways from this episode:
-Happiness is letting go of everything you think your life is supposed to be and celebrating everything it really is.
-It’s important for seniors’ health and emotional well-being to stay connected to other people as they age.
-Research shows that people in their 70s and 80s generally mellow out, are less angry, and worry less.
-The 5 types of people who are coping with health issues are deniers, stoics, realists, complainers, and worriers.
-People are happiest when they have a purpose and are contributing in some way.
-Instead of trying to preserve the life you had, try new things you haven’t done before - you might find another person and a new life on the other side.
Resources mentioned in this episode:
Learn more about Katherine Esty, PhD.'s work:
https://www.katharineesty.com/
Purchase her books:
https://www.katharineesty.com/books
To suggest a topic, be a guest or to support the podcast please email Lori@Loriwilliams-seniorservices.com
For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/
https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/
https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/
088. The (invisible) impact of Alzheimer's Disease in the Asian American Community May is Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month – AAPI for short. To observe it, Tanesha Tyler-Carr returns to the podcast to discuss Alzheimer’s stats as they pertain to the AAPI population. As the programs and services coordinator for the Alzheimer's Association: Dallas and Northeast Texas chapters, she brings her expertise to discuss unique challenges within this group.
According to the Alzheimer Association’s 2021 Facts and Figures Report, the AAPI population is less likely than other groups to have Alzheimer’s. However, only 18% are aware of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Despite prevailing views that forgetfulness is a natural part of aging, it could be a precursor to Alzheimer’s and should be taken seriously.
Senior Services Expert Lori Williams and Tanesha Tyler-Carr discuss such stats, along with:
-AAPI attitudes around medical practitioners and research studies
-Beliefs on aging and cognitive decline
- Other fascinating facts and figures
Tanesha emphasizes that it’s important to be an advocate for your health and to know the warning signs of Alzheimer’s and dementia as a first defense against the disease.
Topics discussed:
-Alzheimer’s and dementia
-Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders
-Mild cognitive impairment
-Clinical trials for Alzheimer’s
-Alzheimer’s Association
-AAPI community
-Systemic racism
Takeaways from this episode:
-Nearly 45% of Asian Americans believe that medical research is biased against people of color. They may be wary of becoming “guinea pigs” for clinical trials due to a history of systemic racism and discrimination in the U.S.
-The Alzheimer’s Association partners with the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging to help people in the AAPI community understand their risk for Alzheimer's and other types of dementia, and to address stigmas and cultural concerns.
-Korean Americans may be at risk due to lifestyle factors such as high alcohol and tobacco use. Language barriers may also limit access to healthcare and insurance.
Resources mentioned in this episode:
083. The true economic impact of Alzheimer's Disease: 2022 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures
https://www.loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/episode/29609f61/083-the-true-economic-impact-of-alzheimers-disease
The Alzheimer’s Association: Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and Alzheimer’s
https://www.alz.org/help-support/resources/asian-americans-and-alzheimers
075. How brain fitness slows down dementia and Alzheimer's disease
https://www.loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/episode/3a1051ca/075-how-brain-fitness-slows-down-dementia-and-alzheimers-disease
To suggest a topic, be a guest or to support the podcast please email Lori@Loriwilliams-seniorservices.com
For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/
https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/
https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/
087. How every community can be Dementia Friendly It’s a beautiful thing when we cater to people with different needs – and can help make daily life enjoyable for everyone. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates 6.5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s today, and with Alzheimer’s being as prevalent as it is, it’s important that businesses and pillars of our community recognize and understand the disease. This is why Erin Caston has worked tirelessly, along with a board of like-minded local senior living professionals to create a Denton County chapter of Dementia Friendly America. This non-profit initiative educates businesses and different sectors of the community - restaurants, financial institutions, churches, etc. to better support those with dementia and their caregivers. They can earn a Dementia Friendly decal to put in their window, identifying them as business that recognizes those with dementia and treats them with respect.
As people with dementia progress in their disease, it’s common for them to isolate at home and retreat from the people and activities they knew. That’s why it’s such a gift when businesses are aware and accommodating of those with different needs - helping them return to activities that may enhance their longevity and joy. That’s why Dementia Friendly’s goal is to help them feel valued and wanted while respecting their needs.
Topics discussed:
- Dementia and Alzheimer’s
- Dementia Friendly
- Senior activities
- Alzheimer’s / Dementia education
- Community outreach
- Dementia-friendly businesses
- Senior-friendly restaurants
Takeaways from this episode:
- One way to think of Alzheimer's and dementia is ‘brain failure,’ similar to how we view heart and kidney failure. Those who live with it still have moments of clarity and know their brain isn’t functioning as it was.
- Dementia Friendly prioritizes giving banks educational resources to prevent fraud and help employees recognize potential signs of dementia, along with phone numbers for support.
- One way for restaurants to support patrons with Alzheimer’s and dementia is to find ways to adapt, such as by amending their menu, so there are fewer choices, and to approach them slowly and calmly.
- Faith-based support at churches is often important to older generations. Finding ways to welcome those with dementia and adjust to their needs, such as by shortening the service and involving music, is beneficial.
- If you can continue to engage those with dementia and their loved ones in your community, then they're spending money on your business, which helps the local economy.
- The Dementia Friendly: Denton County kickoff is May 25, 2022 at the Flower Mound Senior Center, 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.
Resources discussed:
Dementia Friendly America Website – find a local chapter:
https://www.DFamerica.org
Contact Dementia Friendly Denton County:
dementiafriendlydentoncounty@gmail.com.
Join ‘Dementia Friendly Denton County’ on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/DementiaFriendlyDentonCounty
To suggest a topic, be a guest or to support the podcast please email Lori@Loriwilliams-seniorservices.com
For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/
https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/
https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/
086. Occupational Therapy: How it improves the quality of seniors' lives With the right tools and support, anyone can overcome barriers and have a life worth living. That’s the goal of occupational therapists – like guest Heidi Huynh, OTR, CTRS.
Heidi is an occupational therapist that has spent years working with adults in their 50s and into their 100s in a variety of settings, including senior living. Occupational therapy involves helping you do anything you want or need to do safely, more easily, and independently. This is especially important for seniors who need help around the home, especially after hospital visits or injury.
With Senior Services Expert Lori Williams, she discusses:
- The ins and outs of occupational therapy
- Medicare insurance coverage
- The importance of mindset during recovery (and in life)
- Modifications and tools to stay more independent
- And more
Occupational therapy may sound like it just involves your occupation or job, but it’s about helping you adapt to daily tasks. Going to the bathroom, taking a shower, even walking around your home are tasks that occupational therapists make safer for seniors.
With Heidi’s tools, you’ll have ideas of ways to better equip yourself and find the professional help you need.
Topics discussed:
- Occupational therapy
- Home safety for seniors
- Senior independence
- Outcomes for positive, purpose-driven mindsets
- Outpatient therapy
- Skilled nursing facilities
- Walkers, shoehorns and safety bars
- Medicare coverage for occupational therapy
Takeaways from this episode:
- Occupational therapists can provide home visits to strengthen you to perform daily tasks, while adjusting your environment so you can do what you need to, safely.
- It may be tough initially to start using tools like walkers, but it restores quality of life by allowing you to be independent and partake in daily activities.
- Occupational therapy must be ordered by a physician, but is typically covered by Medicare.
- There are differently qualifying factors for home health versus occupational therapy, and they’re covered by different parts of Medicare.
- If you have Medicare Parts A and B and your occupational therapy is medically necessary, you have an unlimited amount of therapist visits.
Resources from this episode:
Ascend Therapy services:
https://weagewithpurpose.com/links
Heidi@ascendtherapypnw.com
How to senior proof a home, on a weekend:
https://www.loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/episode/2541015a/077-want-to-senior-proof-a-home-on-a-budget-on-a-weekend-follow-these-steps
To suggest a topic, be a guest or to support the podcast, please email Lori@Loriwilliams-seniorservices.com
For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter, please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/
https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/
https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/
085. I'm trying something new! I have an announcement to share with you, and I hope you’ll be as excited as I am.
If this podcast has a theme, it’s that you’re never too old to try something new and find your purpose. That purpose will sustain you and create a ripple effect of good in the world.
I’m finding myself having to practice what I preach as I start my newest journey: writing a book.
There are now nearly 100 episodes of this podcast. Through all the interviews, guests, and personal stories I’ve shared, there’s a treasure trove of tips for people who want to learn about topics pertaining to aging - from senior living to Medicare, and even skydiving for seniors.
It’s important that everyone has access to this information in a variety of mediums. My book will help provide a written resource for those who are aging and their loved ones.
But it won’t stop there. Reach out to let me know what your questions are and what you’d like to learn more about! I look forward to providing a comprehensive resource for you.
Takeaways from this episode:
- There’s a lot of confusion about senior living and what services are available. People also worry their lives are over once they retire. This podcast addresses these questions.
- Imposter syndrome is when you mistakenly worry you don’t know what you’re doing, that no one will listen to you, and that you don’t have anything to offer. Don’t listen to that inner voice and keep going to reach your goals.
Topics discussed:
- Senior services
- Questions about senior living
- Senior books
- Writing a book
- Imposter syndrome
- Finding purpose as we age
Send me any questions, ideas, or thoughts for my book at Lori@LoriWilliams-SeniorServices.com or https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com.
084. The Anxiety Sisters: a safe space to talk about anxiety Anxiety can happen to anyone, regardless of age.
However, it can show up in different ways, in different intensities, at different times, among different genders. The conversation around anxiety has also become much more open in newer generations than in the past.
Still, anxiety isn’t discussed often enough – particularly in senior circles. That’s why Senior Living Expert Lori Williams invites ‘The Anxiety Sisters’ Abbe Greenberg and Maggie Sarachek to share their experiences. Authors of The Anxiety Sisters Survival Guide, they’re trained counselors, mental health advocates and anxiety sufferers themselves, with an online community of more than 220,000 in 200+ countries.
Together they discuss:
· Their journey with anxiety and how they became ‘The Anxiety Sisters’
· The anxiety spectrum and different ways it manifests
· Causes of anxiety
· Anxiety management techniques
And more.
Topics discussed:
- Anxiety / Generalized Anxiety Disorder
- Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
- Medication and SSRIs
- Panic attack tips
- Hoarding
- Anxiety causes
- Anxiety and aging
Takeaways from this episode:
- The stress ‘fight, flight, or freeze’ response is the biological cause of anxiety. Hormones, medications, dementia, isolation and genetics can also impact anxiety levels.
- Though women are supposedly 2x as likely to suffer from anxiety, men may not report (or understand) their anxiety, or they redirect their anxiety as anger / rage since it’s more socially accepted.
- Instead of trying to avoid anxiety altogether, it’s helpful to prepare for it. Carry a bag with different items inside to calm your senses, like lavender fabric, photos, or medication. That way you're ready if a panic attack strikes.
- Be aware of how antidepressants or SSRIs can interact with any drugs you’re taking, and discuss health concerns and effects with your doctor.
Resources mentioned in this episode:
Anxiety Sisters' Survival Guide:
https://www.amazon.com/Anxiety-Sisters-Survival-Guide-Connected/dp/B08ZJT2PMZ/ref=sr_1_1?crid=O43LG9Y2O1FE&keywords=anxiety+sisters+survival+guide&qid=1651087146&sprefix=anxiety+sisters%2Caps%2C157&sr=8-1
The Spin Cycle with The Anxiety Sisters Podcast:
https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-spin-cycle/id1223800972
The Anxiety Sisters' Website:
https://anxietysisters.com/
https://www.facebook.com/anxietysisters
To suggest a topic, be a guest or to support the podcast, please email Lori@Loriwilliams-seniorservices.com
For more senior resources and to sign up to the newsletter, please visit:
https://www.facebook.com/LoriWilliamsSeniorServices/
https://www.instagram.com/theloriwilliams/
https://www.linkedin.com/in/theloriwilliams/
https://loriwilliams-seniorservices.com/aging-in-style-podcast/
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