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Always Already Podcast, a critical theory podcast

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Tune in to the Always Already Podcast for indulgent conversations about critical theory (in the broadest read of the term!). Our podcast consists of two episode streams. The first is a discussion of texts spanning critical theory, political theory, social theory, and philosophy. We work through and analyze main ideas, underlying assumptions, connections with other texts and theories, and occasionally delve into the great abyss of free association, ad hoc theory jokes, and makeshift puns. The se… Continue Reading >>
Tune in to the Always Already Podcast for indulgent conversations about critical theory (in the broadest read of the term!). Our podcast consists of two episode streams. The first is a discussion of texts spanning critical theory, political theory, social theory, and philosophy. We work through and analyze main ideas, underlying assumptions, connections with other texts and theories, and occasionally delve into the great abyss of free association, ad hoc theory jokes, and makeshift puns. The second stream, entitled Epistemic Unruliness, consists of interviews and discussions with activists, artists, and academics whose “disobedient” work builds upon the themes of that arise in the texts we discuss and in our ongoing podcast conversations.

In the first stream we also entertain the questions of friends and strangers and dole out slapdash advice about everything from massaging a head of Brooklyn kale to sweet talking a nebechy philosopher and dealing with the vagaries of academic life. We also put on our Fr << Show Less
Featured Audio
Interview: Breea Willingham on Incarceration, Higher Ed, and Abolition – Epistemic Unruliness 37 In this episode, John is joined by his colleague, Dr. Breea Willingham, to discuss her multiple forms of work on higher education in prisons, both within and without academia. Their conversation about the new Journal of Higher Education in Prison, the Jamii Sisterhood, the States of Incarceration Project, and being a Black woman abolitionist in [&#8230;]
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Interview: Breea Willingham on Incarceration, Higher Ed, and Abolition – Epistemic Unruliness 37 In this episode, John is joined by his colleague, Dr. Breea Willingham, to discuss her multiple forms of work on higher education in prisons, both within and without academia. Their conversation about the new Journal of Higher Education in Prison, the Jamii Sisterhood, the States of Incarceration Project, and being a Black woman abolitionist in [&#8230;]
Ep. 72 – Miguel de Beistegui, The Government of Desire Back from a hiatus in western Massachusetts, B joins John and special guest co-host Alyssa Ruth Mazer to discuss Miguel de Beistegui’s book The Government of Desire: A Genealogy of the Liberal Subject. What is a liberal subject and how does desire open up its discourses and genealogy and governmentalities? Did Beistegui try to out-Foucault…Foucault, [&#8230;]
Ep. 71 – Jedidiah Purdy, After Nature In this episode, Emily and John welcome John&#8217;s colleague Gary Kroll for a discussion of Jedediah Purdy&#8216;s After Nature: A Politics for the Anthropocene. We map the contours of the book, asking questions about the scope of the argument and both the promises and limits of its framework. Throughout we interrogate the concepts of the Anthropocene, [&#8230;]
Ep. 71 – Jedidiah Purdy, After Nature In this episode, Emily and John welcome John&#8217;s colleague Gary Kroll for a discussion of Jedediah Purdy&#8216;s After Nature: A Politics for the Anthropocene. We map the contours of the book, asking questions about the scope of the argument and both the promises and limits of its framework. Throughout we interrogate the concepts of the Anthropocene, [&#8230;]
Ep. 70 – Audra Simpson, Mohawk Interruptus John is joined by friends-of-the-show Tyler Tully and Danielle Hanley to discuss Audra Simpson&#8216;s Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States (Duke UP, 2014). The book &#8212; simultaneously a work of political theory, ethnography, and settler colonial studies &#8212; thinks with the Kahnawà:ke Mohawks to examine the situated production and assertion of [&#8230;]
Interview: Jane Gordon and Drucilla Cornell on Creolizing Rosa Luxemburg — Epistemic Unruliness 36 This episode, Rachel and John have the honor and pleasure of interviewing Dr. Jane Anna Gordon and Dr. Drucilla Cornell about their new edited volume, Creolizing Rosa Luxemburg. Part of the Creolizing the Canon series, this volume examines the political economy and political philosophies of Polish Marxist thinker and revolutionary Rosa Luxemburg, from her work on imperialism and the expanded reproduction of capital, to the [&#8230;]
Interview: Eric Bayruns García on Race and Epistemic Injustice — Epistemic Unruliness 35 In this episode, Emily and Rachel talk with the inimitable Eric Bayruns García, Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Cal State San Bernardino, about two recent articles. Specializing in philosophy of race, epistemology, and Latin American philosophy, Bayruns García&#8217;s writing and teaching addresses racial injustice, colonialism, and epistemologies of ignorance, among other topics. In this episode [&#8230;]
Ep. 69 – Dorfman and Mattleart on Disney and Imperialism In this episode, Emily, James, and John enter the Worrisome World-Making of Disney (™) via How to Read Donald Duck, a 1971 Chilean Marxist critique of the American imperial-capitalist project of Disney, republished in 2018. Our trio approaches the book in form and content, and they discuss its social opposition through state censorship &#8212; whether as [&#8230;]
Ep. 68 – W.E.B. Du Bois, Darkwater: Voices from Within the Veil Join Emily, B, Sid, and John for a classic AAP text discussion, this time featuring W.E.B. Du Bois&#8217;s Darkwater: Voices From Within the Veil. Our discussion begins (perhaps unsurprisingly!) with knowledge, education, and epistemology, and spans Du Bois&#8217;s analysis of racial capitalism, his materialism, aesthetics, canonization as a political theorist, and more. We interrogate Du Bois [&#8230;]
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