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National Native News provides listeners with relevant, timely coverage of Native and Indigenous issues and stories. The program began in 1987 and is currently produced in Albuquerque, New Mexico. NNN appeals to listeners who are engaged in the world around them and seek out a broader range of viewpoints. NNN is distributed by Native Voice One (NV1) and can be heard on radio stations across the U.S. and Canada as well as 24/7 on NativeNews.net. Continue Reading >>
National Native News provides listeners with relevant, timely coverage of Native and Indigenous issues and stories. The program began in 1987 and is currently produced in Albuquerque, New Mexico. NNN appeals to listeners who are engaged in the world around them and seek out a broader range of viewpoints. NNN is distributed by Native Voice One (NV1) and can be heard on radio stations across the U.S. and Canada as well as 24/7 on NativeNews.net. << Show Less
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Wednesday, June 29, 2022 Anchor: Antonia Gonzales
The leader of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma says the U.S. Supreme Court has failed its duty to honor the nation’s promises, defied Congress’s statutes, and has disregarded tribal sovereignty.
Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. made the statement following the high court’s ruling Wednesday siding with Oklahoma, ruling the state can prosecute non-Native Americans when the victim is Native American for crimes on tribal land.
The 5-4 decision undercuts the court’s own 2020 landmark McGirt ruling, which reaffirmed reservation boundaries and held the state did not have jurisdiction.
Chief Hoskin expressed disappointment in Wednesday’s ruling, but said it does not diminish the tribe’s commitment to public safety, and that tribal and federal jurisdiction remain unchanged. He also affirmed unchanged reservation and tribal sovereignty.

U.S. Veterans Affairs Secretary Denis McDonough has officially recognized the Navajo Nation Veterans Administration as a tribal veteran service organization.
It meets the standards to be accredited under the VA Tribal Representation Expansion Program, which helps veterans with benefits and claims.
During a visit to Gallup, New Mexico, on Tuesday, McDonough recognized the tribe. His remarks were streamed live by the Navajo Nation president’s office.
“They are the first tribe to take up this new authority and I’m thrilled we can announce that today and as importantly put it into action that we are living up to our obligations.”
Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez called it a milestone achievement and a big step forward for Navajo veterans.
Five Navajo staff members are accredited to process claims. The accreditation allows employees to represent claims on behalf of veterans.
Before, Navajo veterans would have to travel to VA centers off the reservation. More than 80 claims have been filed since May. According to the tribe, there are about 10,000 Navajo veterans.
Navajo leaders say there is a need for a veterans outreach center and hospital on the reservation to provide services and health care.
Gallup, a reservation border town, has one of the closest Community-Based Outpatient Clinics. It was one of four clinics in the state facing closure.
The VA and members of New Mexico’s Congressional delegation announced this week all four
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Wednesday, June 29, 2022 Anchor: Antonia Gonzales
The leader of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma says the U.S. Supreme Court has failed its duty to honor the nation’s promises, defied Congress’s statutes, and has disregarded tribal sovereignty.
Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. made the statement following the high court’s ruling Wednesday siding with Oklahoma, ruling the state can prosecute non-Native Americans when the victim is Native American for crimes on tribal land.
The 5-4 decision undercuts the court’s own 2020 landmark McGirt ruling, which reaffirmed reservation boundaries and held the state did not have jurisdiction.
Chief Hoskin expressed disappointment in Wednesday’s ruling, but said it does not diminish the tribe’s commitment to public safety, and that tribal and federal jurisdiction remain unchanged. He also affirmed unchanged reservation and tribal sovereignty.

U.S. Veterans Affairs Secretary Denis McDonough has officially recognized the Navajo Nation Veterans Administration as a tribal veteran service organization.
It meets the standards to be accredited under the VA Tribal Representation Expansion Program, which helps veterans with benefits and claims.
During a visit to Gallup, New Mexico, on Tuesday, McDonough recognized the tribe. His remarks were streamed live by the Navajo Nation president’s office.
“They are the first tribe to take up this new authority and I’m thrilled we can announce that today and as importantly put it into action that we are living up to our obligations.”
Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez called it a milestone achievement and a big step forward for Navajo veterans.
Five Navajo staff members are accredited to process claims. The accreditation allows employees to represent claims on behalf of veterans.
Before, Navajo veterans would have to travel to VA centers off the reservation. More than 80 claims have been filed since May. According to the tribe, there are about 10,000 Navajo veterans.
Navajo leaders say there is a need for a veterans outreach center and hospital on the reservation to provide services and health care.
Gallup, a reservation border town, has one of the closest Community-Based Outpatient Clinics. It was one of four clinics in the state facing closure.
The VA and members of New Mexico’s Congressional delegation announced this week all four
Full audio: Native take on Roe v. Wade reversal This press call captured the reaction to the U.S. Supreme Court&#8217;s reversal of Roe v. Wade of several Native elders and activists including Krystal Curly, director of the Native-women-led organization Indigenous Lifeways, and elder and lifelong Native advocate Noreen Kelly.


Tuesday, June 28, 2022 Anchor: Antonia Gonzales
California tribal leaders and state lawmakers are advocating for legislation to help law enforcement and tribes locate missing Native Americans.
They’re gathering in Sacramento Tuesday to announce the “Feather Alert” bill (AB 1314), which will be heard before the Senate Public Safety Committee.
Tribal leaders gathered at the state capitol in May urging legislators to take more urgent action on the issue of missing and murdered Indigenous people.
Chairwoman Janet Bill of the Picayune Rancheria of the Chukchansi Indians was among leaders to testify at a May 4th hearing in the Select Committee on Native American Affairs.
She urged lawmakers to partner with tribes to help address MMIP in California.
“I’m standing ready to not only keep the dialog going, but ready to roll up my sleeves and get work done and work tirelessly with you and other key stakeholders to ensure this happens. This is an issue that will take every single one of us to come together and solve. It’s incumbent upon tribes, the state and others to partner and work together to make this epidemic a priority and attention it deserves.”
Chairwoman Bill is joining other tribal leaders and lawmakers to announce the “Feather Alert” bill.
The legislation by Native State Rep. James Ramos (D-CA) seeks to create an alert system to issue advisories to help law enforcement and tribes locate missing people. Rep. Ramos in a statement about the bill said there’s much work to do, but this is one step that can help.
A Native American organization in Montana is hoping to increase voter numbers after low turnout during the June primary. Eric Tegethoff has more.
Keaton Sunchild with Western Native Voice says numbers were low even for a midterm primary – at 21% of Native American precincts in Montana. He says new election laws likely affected numbers, especially an end to same-day voter registration.
Sunchild notes same-day signups are used frequently by Native Americans who often live in rural areas and only make one trip to the polls.
&#8220;Certainly disappointed with how low the turnout was originally, but we also recognize that there were some new barriers put in place, some confusion with the laws and various lawsuits. As well as turnout is usually lower, as we all know, in midterm elections.&#8221;
Restrictive election laws were passed by Montana legislators in 2021, but an injunction had been in place blocking those laws, including an end to same-day voter registration.
However, the state Supreme Court overturned the injunction in May, allowing the restrictive laws to go into place before the primary.
A trial is expected on these laws later this summer.
Western Native Voice is setting up voting kiosks on re
Monday, June 27, 2022 Anchor: Antonia Gonzales
Native advocates in New Mexico voice anger over Friday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision to end the federal right to abortion leaving authority up to states.
Elder and lifelong Native advocate Noreen Kelly joined reproductive health and advocacy groups on a press call Friday following news of the ruling.
Kelly says in the Native community women are often the decision makers in the household and men play a role as equal partners.  She says male politicians and judges should not have access to a woman’s body autonomy.
“Our decisions are our own. They’re made with care and there’s reasonings and holiness behind the decisions women make. It really angers me and it saddens me that someone still thinks they can make decisions for women and I appreciate the men that are supporting us. But they didn’t have that right to speak on our behalf.”
Krystal Curly, director of the Native-women led organization Indigenous Lifeways, also attended the press conference. Curly says Native women already face challenges when it comes to health care, and lack of access to abortion.
She adds that in wake of the high court decision, her organization will continue to advocate for Native women’s rights.
“We know that Indigenous women have always been a threat to this colonial system since day one and now 500 plus years, women and pregnant people as a whole are a threat to this colonial system, and it’s now at this time that it is so pivotal we come together and unite.”
Abortion in New Mexico is likely to remain legal while neighboring states in the Southwest are expected to see changes.
X’unei Lance Twitchell
The University of Alaska Southeast is set to offer a free option for Alaska Native language classes starting in the Fall. Claire Stremple reports.
X’unei Lance Twitchell is a professor of Alaska Native languages at UAS. He says this is part of revitalizing the Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian languages.
“I think it&#8217;s going to be medicinal, I think it&#8217;s going to alter the course of the way things are going. And it&#8217;s really exciting.”
There has been a decline in Alaska Native languages over the last hundred years due to genocide and assimilation.
Many elders who were birth speakers died during the COVID-19 pandemic. But Twitchell says there has also been a shift in the last decade toward language revitalization.
For example, UAS offered free Tlingit courses during the pandemic. Twitchell says 600 people signed up.
“We didn&#8217;t put ourselves in this situation, our language was banished, it was prohibited, it was made illegal. We were tortured and abused, and all kinds of things to get us to stop speaking. So why should we have to pay to learn our own language?”
Arts and Sciences Dean Carin Silkaitis says one of their main jobs is to support faculty and find ways to say “yes.”
“You have to open doors, you have to bring seats to tables. And I think the way to do that is to create more access. And I think creating free curriculum as a way to create more access for people.”
Dean Silkaitis says the
Friday, June 24, 2022 Anchor: Antonia Gonzales
Active shooter preparedness training is being offered to tribal communities across the country by a Louisiana State University academy.
The National Center for Biomedical Research and Training, Academy of Counter-Terrorist Education teaches mobile classes in Indian Country.
Robert Holden, the academy’s tribal liaison, says they’ve partnered with many tribes over the years to help them prepare and respond to emergency situations. He says the courses help participants learn how to better protect themselves, their communities and infrastructure from potential threats whether it’s in the classroom, a tribal office or elsewhere in the community.
Holden sees a more urgent need for the training today, pointing to recent gun violence in Texas and New York.
“We have program that provides training to tribal departments, public safety, can be utilized by emergency medical services, fire departments. It helps them to train, the things that they do on a regular basis, but it’s at no cost to tribal governments. We bring everything out, instructors who have taught in foreign nations and states and other entities across the world.”
Holden says the trainings are also tailored to meet Indian Country needs such as, taking into consideration each tribe’s culture, beliefs, decision making processes and jurisdictional issues.

Gun violence has been a hot topic across the country including in the nation’s capital. The U.S. Senate Thursday passed a bipartisan bill to address gun violence, which is now being considered in the House.

The National Congress of American Indians met in Alaska last week for its mid-year conference, focusing on top concerns facing tribal communities. As Emily Schwing reports, some tribal leaders are calling for more unity within the NCAI and others are seeking a shift in how sovereign nations describe and represent themselves.
The day before the mid-year conference convened, NCAI announced its CEO, Dante Desiderio, would not be in attendance. According to the statement, he is observing an administrative leave of absence. The statement says the “leave is appropriate under the organization&#8217;s policies governing the current situation,” but offered few other details. Harold Frazier, Chairman of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe in South Dakota, said turmoil within NCAI is a problem for member Nations.
“That&#8217;s something that is really frustrating, because the fight’s out there and we can’t be fighting inside or internally. You know, I think we need to get back to the core functions of a government and advocating for better healthcare, more housing and things like that.”
During a general Assembly, Ron Allen, president and CEO of the Jamestown S&#8217;Klallam Tribe in Washington, called for a paradigm shift in how tribes present themselves in order to emphasize their sovereignty.
“Are you a tribe or are you a nation? They mean the same. Nation is more reflective of sovereignty… So you’re changing that paradigm and the perception of the outside world looking at you in terms of who y
Thursday, June 23, 2022 Anchor: Antonia Gonzales
Interior Sec. Deb Haaland vows to continue to investigate U.S. Indian boarding schools and support healing efforts for tribal communities impacted by intergenerational trauma caused by the schools.
Many students faced physical, mental, spiritual and sexual abuse. And, many students did not make it back home.
Sec. Haaland testified Wednesday before the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs on the findings of her federal Indian boarding school initiative, which she announced last June.
A report released in May found there were 408 schools across the U.S. from 1819 to 1969, and about 53 marked or unmarked burial sites identified.
Boarding school policies focused on cultural assimilation, and the forced removal and relocation of Native children.
Sec. Haaland says as the investigation continues, the next step is to gather testimony, find support for healing, and resources for language and culture initiatives.
“I recently announced we will embark on the road to healing, a tour to hear directly from survivors and descendants. A necessary part of this journey will be to connect survivors and their families with mental health support, create a permanent collection of oral histories. We know this won’t be easy, but this is a history we must learn from if we are to heal from this tragic era in our country.”
The hearing also focused on Indian boarding school legislation (S. 2907) to create a commission to help locate and analyze records, and hold culturally appropriate hearings.
Sandra White Hawk, board president of the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition, was among a panel of Native leaders to testify in support of the legislation.
“It will open up wounds, but in order for us to heal we need to air out those wounds and replace them with the medicines that we have within our ceremonies, our songs along with our mental health professionals that can help us as well. Most importantly, what was taken from us our songs, our lifeways that will bring the healing when our wounds are open from that. There was an elder that was one of my teachers and he said we are people that are well acquainted with grief. And, I’ve watched and seen that as we’ve gone into communities and listened to experiences and watched healing take place.”
Senators on the Indian Affairs Committee, including chair Brian Schatz (D-HI), vowed to continue to push the boarding school legislation forward and to help find appropriations.
Click here to read the testimonies or watch the hearing
Leaders of an Indigenous community in Sonora, Mexico have banned outside tour operators from bringing visitors to their territory. Instead, they are asking tourists to arrange visits directly with members of the community. From the Fronteras Desk, KJZZ’s Kendal Blust reports.
The Comcaac New Year, the community&#8217;s most important celebration, is comin
Wednesday, June 22, 2022 Anchor: Antonia Gonzales
Tribal leaders are applauding President Joe Biden’s intent to appoint Mohegan Chief Marilynn “Lynn” Malerba as Treasurer of the United States.
She would be the first-ever Native American to serve in the position – among duties overseeing a new office of tribal affairs and serving as a key liaison.
National Congress of American Indians President Fawn Sharp expressed her overwhelming support saying there’s much work to do in Indian Country on economic development, governmental tax parity for tribes, and addressing capital needs.
Sharp also noted the importance of having a Native American in the Treasury Department.
Native representation in all levels of government was discussed last week at the National Congress of American Indians mid-year gathering in Alaska.
Jenifer Nelson, board chair of the Aleut Corporation, says it’s great to see Native women making history in leadership roles pointing to Interior Secretary Deb Haaland. 
“In my culture, very matriarchal. I watched my grandmother support local policy, very heavily influenced and even in the Unangan culture women sewed the skin boats for the hunters. So, they always played an integral role in making sure that our cultures survive and our people thrive.”  
Dalee Sambo, international chair of the Inuit Circumpolar Council, echoes the role of Native women in government and hopes to see more women become leaders on a global scale.
“The role that women play in all these diverse fora really reflects the exercise of good governance. Women more often than not, they ensure inclusion and also more transparency, more effectiveness in terms of how decisions are made. When you have woman in that position able to embrace so many others and significantly, we do it in our homes where those values we’re really able to carry them and practice them at all scales.” 
Sambo and Nelson made the comments during live coverage of the NCAI conference in Anchorage on Koahnic&#8217;s sibling radio station KNBA.
The White House on Tuesday announced the president’s intent to appoint Malerba as Treasurer of the U.S.
Leaders from Maine, Hawaii, Alaska, and Minnesota are testifying Wednesday before the <a class="wp-links-icon" href="https://ww
Tuesday, June 21, 2022 Anchor: Antonia Gonzales
The chief of the Mohegan Tribe, Lynn Malerba, has been tapped as Treasurer of the United States.
The announcement of President Joe Biden’s intent to appoint Chief Malerba was made Tuesday ahead of a visit by the Treasury Department to the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota.
Chief Malerba became chief of the Mohegan Tribe in Connecticut in 2010. She’s the first woman to serve as top leader in the tribe’s modern history.
Chief Malerba will also make history at the Department of Treasury as a tribal leader and Native woman to sign currency.
In a statement, Chief Malerba said she’s honored and that it’s important to have Native voices respected, adding her appointment by the administration underscores just that.
She will oversee a newly established Office of Tribal and Native Affairs to communicate with tribes and be a hub for tribal policy.
The Treasurer of the United States directly oversees the U.S. Mint and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing – and is a key liaison with the Federal Reserve.
Secretary of Treasury Janet Yellen will announce her appointment and the new tribal office during the visit Tuesday to the Rosebud reservation.
Canada’s Assembly of First Nations has suspended its National Chief Roseann Archibald. As Dan Karpenchuk reports, it comes a day after she criticized the organization and also faces an investigation over complaints against her.
Roseann Archibald, the country’s first woman to lead the most powerful Native organization in Canada, is calling the suspension a coup.
Now, she has become the first AFN chief to be locked out, even from her own emails, and it all comes less than a year after her historic election.
The AFN says the decision is regrettable, but the national chief has committed serious breaches of her obligations to the organization through her unfounded public attacks against the AFN.
Paul Prosper is an AFN regional chief from the east coast.
“She breached her obligations to the company contrary to her oath of office, to our code of conduct, and the whistle blower policy.” 
Archibald has faced allegations of bullying and harassment from four of her staff members. After that, the AFN brought in an outside investigator.
Archibald is calling it a smear campaign and says she has been trying to clean up the corruption within the organization and because of that she says she’s been undermined, discredited, and attacked.
The AFN would not disclose exactly what the complaints against her are.
Archibald has been suspended with pay pending the outcome of an investigation.
She will not be able to attend the annual general assembly or the chief’s assembly and is prohibited from discussing the investigation publicly.
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Monday, June 20, 2022 Anchor: Antonia Gonzales
Alaska Native leaders are concerned about climate and environmental issues. Those were among discussions last week at the National Congress of American Indians mid-year gathering in Anchorage. As Emily Schwing reports, leaders in Alaska and other states are seeing wildfires having an impact on their communities.
Earlier this month, the largest wildfire currently burning in the state of Alaska forced the evacuation of roughly 150 residents who live in the village of St. Mary’s, a small Yup’ik village located more than 300 miles west of Anchorage. George Beans is the President of Yupiit of Andreafski, one of two tribes in the village. 
“Right now, it was mostly the climate change. We’re dealing with a fire, a pretty big fire at home and I think climate change has a lot to do with these fires that are popping up. It’s just too dry.”
Beans said it was tough for him to decide if he should leave the village for the conference. 
“Well first of all, we had pre-registered and we invested a lot of our finances into coming to this meeting. They address a lot of issues here and there’s a lot of intercommunication between each other and that’s why I think it’s important. We get a lot of information and we can seek some help when we do need in different areas that we do need help.”
At more than 160,000 acres, the East fork fire is the largest fire ever to burn in Alaska’s Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta Region.
It’s also the largest tundra fire the state has seen in 40 years. As of Sunday, fire officials have reported managers have reached their objectives to contain the blaze.
A new art installation in Eugene, OR has visitors gazing at art, that in turn, gazes right back. 

KLCC’s Brian Bull reports on the “Culture Raising” installation and how it recognizes the region’s Indigenous people. 
Flashback to August 2021, and I’m on a stretch of sidewalk between a couple utility buildings and construction projects.
Charly Swing, director of Art City, points out what at first looks like an ordinary fence 100 feet long, 8 feet high, and with individual faces.
“Actually, two faces. Each is a youth and an elder, of Native American and Indigenous people, who live in our community.”
A growing awareness of the land’s original inhabitants, the Kalapuya, has helped Oregonians relate the past with the present. Tennepah Brainard, who goes by “T.J.” is the conceptual artist behind the Culture Raising project.  She’s of Coos/Apache heritage, and a student at the Institute of American Indian Art in Santa Fe. She coordinated photography of the subjects, whose images were transferred to the fence slats. 
“And so, I thought okay, let’s do like half a face and eyes, but after a while I realized that for me, it’s kinda of like doing Native American people just as people. Not like full-on headgear and regalia, just…see that we’re here, and this is us, and how we look very different and how we look like everyone else.’”
The Culture Raising installation is now up for several months and will be on display during th
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