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Animal Inituitve Webinars this August with Animal Communicator Cindy Myers I’ve always been a good listener. However, twenty years ago, I would have found it hilarious if you told me that I’d be working as an intuitive energy healer while living on an alpaca farm! But, here I am with a herd of 24 alpacas, 3 dogs and 3 cats working as a Medical Intuitive! I believe that the sum of our life experiences can lead us to our true calling in life. There are many paths to finding our way to our authentic selves.   It took many years, multiple and diverse career paths, and tough life challenges to finding my true calling. The life lessons were invaluable that led me to this meaningful life. I learned about frequencies and Radars while working as an Engineer for the Navy and now I am a Radar! I learned all about stress and how harmful it is to our body, mind and spirit while being my mom’s caregiver through her final years. And there was an amazing gift I created out of the house fire I experienced due to an arsonist. Losing my belongings led me to discovering myself. And I found the courage to embrace and pursue my calling of intuitive energy work. It is an honor and humbles me to do this work for people and their animals. I love sharing my intuitive abilities with both animals and humans. I look forward to helping you restore your energy balance so you can live an abundantly joy filled life! Visit https://yourenergyhealer.com/about/
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Animal Inituitve Webinars this August with Animal Communicator Cindy Myers I’ve always been a good listener. However, twenty years ago, I would have found it hilarious if you told me that I’d be working as an intuitive energy healer while living on an alpaca farm! But, here I am with a herd of 24 alpacas, 3 dogs and 3 cats working as a Medical Intuitive! I believe that the sum of our life experiences can lead us to our true calling in life. There are many paths to finding our way to our authentic selves.   It took many years, multiple and diverse career paths, and tough life challenges to finding my true calling. The life lessons were invaluable that led me to this meaningful life. I learned about frequencies and Radars while working as an Engineer for the Navy and now I am a Radar! I learned all about stress and how harmful it is to our body, mind and spirit while being my mom’s caregiver through her final years. And there was an amazing gift I created out of the house fire I experienced due to an arsonist. Losing my belongings led me to discovering myself. And I found the courage to embrace and pursue my calling of intuitive energy work. It is an honor and humbles me to do this work for people and their animals. I love sharing my intuitive abilities with both animals and humans. I look forward to helping you restore your energy balance so you can live an abundantly joy filled life! Visit https://yourenergyhealer.com/about/
Dr. Gjivoje gives advice on geriatic dog care If your dog is going a little gray in the muzzle, they may be entering the senior stage of their life. While the standard age range for senior dogs varies by breed and size, pet parents should watch for signs of aging and make necessary adjustments to provide their pets with the best senior dog care available.   How to Take Care of Senior Dogs If you need to take care of a dog who is older, making subtle changes to your dog’s routine, veterinary care, and home environment can help them live a healthier and more comfortable life.   Tip 1: Keep Your Senior Dog Active As dogs age, it’s important that they continue to get plenty of exercise. If they don't move it, they lose it. Muscle mass is the main driver of metabolism, and dogs that lose muscle mass develop frailty syndrome, which accelerates the aging process. If a dog’s activity level gradually decreases over time, it could be a sign that something is wrong. Owners of old dogs should watch for subtle signs of pain and visit a veterinarian to come up with an ideal treatment plan. Pet parents still think that 'slowing down' is normal for old age. It isn't always the case—it is indicative of untreated pain. Dog monitors that attach to a dog collar, such as the Whistle 3 dog GPS tracker and activity monitor, are useful tools that are designed to help pet parents keep tabs of their dog’s activity level. If activity levels are low, dog owners can adjust a pet’s exercise routine to include more playtime or longer walks. Keeping your senior dog active will also help prevent weight gain. Keeping your dog thin is the most important thing you can do to help minimize the effects of arthritis.   Tip 2: Get Your Dog’s Blood Work Checked As dogs get older, it’s a good idea to see your veterinarian on a regular basis for checkups. Besides an annual or biannual exam, it is suggested that pet parents get yearly blood work done for their senior dogs. It's recommended that you do blood work to check your senior dog's white and red blood cells and their kidney and liver function to make sure that they're healthy. This is an easy way of being able to detect any kind of disease.   Tip 3: Invest in an Orthopedic or Heated Dog Bed If you want to take care of a dog that is getting up there in age, splurging on an orthopedic dog bed or a heated dog bed may help senior dogs that are suffering from arthritis and other joint problems. A pain-free, restful sleep is huge for older dogs. It can improve mobility, reduce pain, and improve quality of life. A heated dog bed may help a senior dog with stiffness and joint problems. It has a built-in heater that warms up to your dog’s natural body temperature. You can place a heated pad or mat into your dog’s bed for a similar effect. Consider electric warming pads that are thermostatically controlled and have emergency shut-offs if they overheat. Such a pad will provide substantial relief for the achiness of age-related arthritis. In particular, the K&H Pet Products pet bed warmer is specifically designed not to exceed the natural body temperature of your dog. It fits inside most pet beds and is MET listed for safety. This means that it has been tested at a “Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory” to ensure quality and safety standards.   Tip 4: Try Using a Dog Support Sling If your senior dog has mobility problems, a dog support sling or a specially designed dog harness can be a big help. If your dog has a really hard time getting up, sometimes using a dog sling can help them get on their feet. There are great harnesses available that have a handle on the back so you can easily assist your dog. Dog support slings are designed to help make walking, climbing stairs, going to the bathroom, or getting into the car easier for your senior dog.   Tip 5: Make Small Changes to Your Dog’s Environment If you have a senior dog, making small adjustments to your home and their environment can have a big impact. Putting down more carpeting around your home so that your senior dog will have an easier time getting up and will be less likely to slip on hardwood or tile floors. Dog socks with rubberized, non-slip soles can also help provide traction for senior dogs. It is also recommended that senior dog parents consider using dog ramps throughout their homes. Ramps are a wonderful way to help dogs get into cars, up and down stairs and onto furniture. Additionally, pet parents may need to reevaluate the dog food and water setup they have for their dog in order to provide extra comfort and ease of use. Pet parents should consider an elevated dog bowl f
Summit Lost Pet Rescue in Summit County, Colorado gives Bark & Wag an update on the last year NEED OUR HELP WITH A LOST PET? ​ CLICK HERE to complete our Owner Intake Waiver Form ​ If you lost a pet and would like to request the services of Summit Lost Pet Rescue to help you find your pet, please fill out the Owner Intake Waiver Form above and call us at 970-423-5701. Then view tips on our "Lost Your Pet" tab above. ​ **Our team will do our very best to assist with every lost pet as it is our passion to save every single lost pet. Due to the high volume of lost reports we receive daily, we may have limited number of volunteers and resources, and may not be able to assist on every search. Please follow our search protocols that we have listed in detail on our Lost A Pet tab at www.lostpetrescue.org/lost-pet ​ OUR MISSION: Summit Lost Pet Rescue is an animal protection and welfare organization devoted to educating the public about lost pet prevention, finding lost pets in Summit County Colorado and reuniting them with their owners. ​ We are 100% donation based and donations go directly toward resources and supplies to help find lost pets. If you'd like to donate, please click on the Donate link. ​ ​ RESCUE REPORT since January 2020: LOST PETS FOUND & REUNITED WITH OWNERS: 288 DOGS 88 CATS ​ CALLING ALL PETS! Summit Lost Pet Rescue in Summit County, CO is excited to announce our 2nd Annual Pet Photo Calendar Contest Snap a photo of your pet and enter our contest today. You can enter photos until 8/8/22 at 9:00pm Mountain Time. All proceeds benefit and further our Lost Pet Rescue! Get more info and Submit Photos Here! ​
Keeping your pet safe and calm over the Fourth of July with Dr. Laura Brown Pet safety over the 4th of July is very important.  The 4th of July can mean fun, food, friends and fireworks for people, but for our pets, it can feel more like a scary alien invasion! In fact, July 5th is the busiest day of the year for animal shelters, which fill up quickly with animals who panic and flee the bright lights and loud noises of holiday celebrations. Make July 4th a pet-riotic holiday by following these steps for a stress free day for both you and your fur-kids. Prepare for the worst-case scenario.  July 4th is a great annual reminder to be prepared in case your pet escapes or gets lost. If your pet is not wearing a collar with an ID tag, now is the best time to get one. You’ll also want to double check that your pet is microchipped and that the chip is registered with updated contact information.   Avoid the crowds. Avoid bringing your pooch to super crowded events, parades, and other gatherings with a lot of commotion or people. A combination of heat, loud noises, packed spaces and scorching blacktop can not only be stressful, but harmful to your pet’s health. Better to leave them at home in a cool spot with lots of water. It’s especially wise to avoid bringing your pets to firework events, as they could panic and try to run. Work them out.  Be sure to give your pets lots of exercise during the day, so they’ll be a little worn out before the scary noises start at night. A nice long run or play session during the daytime will help with your pet’s overall stress and anxiety levels. Some pets may sleep right through the night time celebrations! Head indoors before the fun begins. Don’t wait for the fireworks to be in full swing before taking care of your pet. It’s best to bring him or her indoors or put them in a cozy spot well ahead of the first boom of fireworks. Which brings us to…  Create a safe space. Pre-pyrotechnics, create a safe, escape-proof space in your home. Lower the blinds, close the windows, provide a bed or crate where they feel comfortable, offer a special chew or toy to distract them and turn on the TV or radio to help mask the noises outside. Wrap them up. Confining movement in dogs and cats actually has a calming effect on them, which is why you might want to consider an anti-anxiety wrap or coat. Try this one, available on Amazon. In a pinch, you can even create one from a scarf. Give them a chill pill. If you’re really worried about a pet who stresses easily, talk to your vet in advance about anti-anxiety chews, drops or other remedies that can help your pet relax. There are plenty of prescription and homeopathic solutions out there that can help your pet get the extra dose of relaxation that he or she needs. Independence Day is fun for us, but it’s the worst day imaginable for some cats and dogs. They literally think the world is ending! Do them a favor and make sure they’re well protected and safe so they stay with you for many years to come. Happy Fourth!
Dr. Laura Brown gives dog hiking tips Dogs can be excellent company in the outdoors. Exploring the wilderness with a furry friend can be an incredibly fun and bonding experience, but only if you plan ahead. If you don’t, bringing your dog could be a dangerous mistake, one that ends abruptly, unpleasantly, or even tragically. What do you need to know, bring, do, and avoid when camping or hiking with your dog? First, you’ll want to determine if your dog is capable of making the trip. Next, locate dog-friendly outdoor adventure spots. Prepare your dog physically for outdoor adventures. Learn proper trail etiquette for dogs and their owners. Learn how to deal with dog poop on a long hike or backpacking trip. Know the most common dangers and threats to dogs while hiking. Learn how to load a dog’s pack properly (and what to bring to ensure your pet’s comfort and safety). Make your own dog booties (if you want) dog bootie instructions. Find answers to other frequently asked questions about hiking with your dog. Below, you’ll find everything you need to know to adventure safely and optimize the fun for both you and your pet.  Can I Take My Dog for a Hike? First, it’s important to recognize that not all dogs are capable of hiking. Since your dog will do her best to keep up with you, possibly at the risk of her own health or safety, it’s up to you to be realistic about what you’re asking your pet to do. Dogs that are very young or old may not only lack the stamina and strength for the trip, but their immune systems might make them even more vulnerable. (Old dogs might still go on hikes if you keep these tips in mind.) Any dog that has health issues or isn’t physically fit enough to exercise all day and endure temperature fluctuations might not make the best hiking buddy. Brachycephalic breeds (short-muzzled dogs)—like pugs, boxers, and Boston terriers—do not do well in heat and are not known for their endurance. Their shortened muzzles and narrowed nares actually make it quite dangerous to take them out in the heat or on endurance hikes. These breeds are at higher risk of heat stroke and exercise intolerance. That doesn’t mean they can’t kill it on shorter jaunts; just use caution. Breeds that might get overly excited in nature, like scent and sight hounds or dogs with high prey drive, are not ideal in the wild. Some can be conditioned out of these behaviors and learn to obey whistles and commands, but these dogs are more likely to take off after something and ignore your commands. Dogs that are not properly trained and don’t follow commands can be a danger to themselves, to other hikers, and to wildlife, so they should be left at home. Don’t overestimate your dog’s capabilities, even if she regularly accompanies you on walks. Consider the terrain and weather conditions of that specific trail. Is the ground steep, jagged, icy, or slippery? Will it be extremely hot, and will there be enough shade? Check with your vet to see if your dog is ready for action. Make sure you are up-to-date on vaccinations and ask the vet about medical or preventative measures to take for waterborne pathogens and the treatment of snakebites and parasites (like ticks). If you microchip your dog, then you’ll have some way of locating her if you get separated on the trail. Is my puppy too young for hiking?   Michelle Richardson, a vet in Helena, Montana, advises waiting until your puppy has received all her shots (about five months) before taking her on the trail, and keeping hikes shorter than one hour to start. DHPP, a combo vaccination administered serially, will be required, as is a rabies shot which is given at 4 months. You can also elect to get the Leptospirosis vaccination, which will protect her from pathogens found in wildlife urine. The only way to avoid waterborne pathogens is to prevent dogs from drinking stream water, and the only way to treat them is with prescription meds from a vet (done in-house). Offer your dog clean, filtered water often so she’s not searching for other sources. Every hiker needs a break every once in a while—even the canine kind.Lottie Where Can I Take My Dog Hiking or Camping? Once you’ve determined that your dog is indeed capable of hiking, the first thing to consider is location. Many trails and campsites require leashes or don’t welcome dogs at all, so you’ll need to do your research ahead of time. Most national parks don’t allow dogs, and if they do, they require leashes at all times and sometimes requi
Are you going back to the office? Tips on how to curb separation anxiety with Kersti Moss Here Are Five Tips to Help Ease Separation Anxiety Before You Leave the House, Take Your Dog for a Walk. ... No Touch, No Talk, No Eye Contact. ... Say Goodbye to Your Dog Long Before You Leave. ... Stay Calm and Assertive! ... Start Out Small by Leaving Your Dog Alone for Just Five Minutes. ... Leave Your Dog with a Good Audiobook. Contact a local dog trainer to help you so your dog does not get hurt
Safe Outdoor Dogs Act update with Shelby Bobosky, Executive Director, for the Texas Humane Legislation Network On October 25, 2021, after the most contentious Texas legislative session in memory, the Safe Outdoor Dogs Act was signed into law. THLN never wavered during the six-year quest to pass this legislation, even when it was targeted by an extremist lawmaker and unexpectedly vetoed. Texas dogs and the communities where they reside deserve a common-sense, balanced policy governing the restraint of dogs outdoors. The Safe Outdoor Dogs Act, which goes into effect January 18, 2022, achieves that by: Defining adequate shelter to protect dogs from extreme temperatures, inclement weather, and standing water. Previously, there was no definition for shelter, thus tethered dogs routinely perished from exposure. Requiring access to drinkable water. Before the Safe Outdoor Dogs Act, state law did not include this vital requirement. Requiring safe restraints. The Safe Outdoor Dogs Act strikes the use of chains. Other means of restraint, such as cable tie-outs, may be used so long as they are correctly attached to a collar or harness designed to restrain a dog. Arguably the most significant change wrought by the Safe Outdoor Dogs Act is removing the 24-hour warning period that allowed bad actors to flout the law. Officers can take immediate action for tethered dogs in distress from now on. What the Safe Outdoor Act Does - English | Spanish How to Properly Restrain Your Dog Outdoors - English | Spanish Key Exceptions to the Safe Outdoors Act - English | Spanish Exceptions to the Safe Outdoor Dogs ActThe Safe Outdoor Dogs Act does not prevent owners from tethering dogs. The law requires that unattended dogs are tethered in a way that keeps them and the people around them safe, and there are several exceptions to the law. The Safe Outdoor Dogs Act does not apply to dogs who are: Attached to a cable-tie out or trolley system. Camping or using other public recreational areas. Herding livestock or assisting with farming tasks. Hunting or participating in field trials. In an open-air truck bed while the owner completes a temporary task. Restraining Dogs Without Using ChainsThe American Veterinary Medical Association and the Center for Disease Control agree that chaining dogs is an inappropriate method of restraint. Not only do chains tangle, rust, and break, but they often cause pain and injury. Conversely, cable tie-outs and trolley systems are designed to restrain dogs, so they are lightweight, strong, and flexible. On average, they cost between $15-$30 and are easy to find in stores and online. Below are links to highly rated cable tie-outs and trolley systems: Tumbo Trolley Dog Containment System Expawlorer Dog Tie Out Cable Boss Pet Prestige Skyline Trolly BV Pet Heavy Extra-Large Tie Out Cable Petest Trolley Runner Cable XiaZ Dog Runner Tie Out Cable Watch this short video to see examples of cable tie-outs recommended by a company that r
Signs your dog is overheating with Dr. Laura Brown Overheated dogs can suffer heat exhaustion, heat stroke or sudden death from cardiac arrhythmias. Panting, followed by disorientation and fast, noisy breathing could signal overheating. Other possible signs: Collapsing or convulsing, bright red or blue gums, vomiting and diarrhea. How to cool a dog down fast Move your dog to a cooler location + encourage them to drink. Spray and soak their coat with tepid, lukewarm water. Blow air over your dog. Ice pack your dogs groin, armpits + neck area. Placing soaked towels over your dog.
Free webinars in June with Cindy Myer, Animal Communicator. Perfect for you and your pet. Cindy Myers Ambassador to Animals, Humans and Spirit   I’ve always been a good listener. However, twenty years ago, I would have found it hilarious if you told me that I’d be working as an intuitive energy healer while living on an alpaca farm! But, here I am with a herd of 24 alpacas, 3 dogs and 3 cats working as a Medical Intuitive! I believe that the sum of our life experiences can lead us to our true calling in life. There are many paths to finding our way to our authentic selves.   It took many years, multiple and diverse career paths, and tough life challenges to finding my true calling. The life lessons were invaluable that led me to this meaningful life. I learned about frequencies and Radars while working as an Engineer for the Navy and now I am a Radar! I learned all about stress and how harmful it is to our body, mind and spirit while being my mom’s caregiver through her final years. And there was an amazing gift I created out of the house fire I experienced due to an arsonist. Losing my belongings led me to discovering myself. And I found the courage to embrace and pursue my calling of intuitive energy work. It is an honor and humbles me to do this work for people and their animals.   I love sharing my intuitive abilities with both animals and humans. I look forward to helping you restore your energy balance so you can live an abundantly joy filled life!   Sign up on Cindy's website: https://yourenergyhealer.com/about/
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