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‎California Sun Podcast

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The California Sun presents conversations with the people that are shaping and observing the Golden State Continue Reading >>
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Paul Pringle's story of peril and power in L.A. Paul Pringle is a long-time investigative reporter for the Los Angeles Times and a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner. His series of stories uncovering the drug use and criminal behavior of the dean of USC’s Keck School of Medicine shifted the tectonic plates of both USC and Pringle’s employer, the L.A. Times. It’s a story of the power of investigative journalism, and the role of powerful institutions in a big city like Los Angeles. He writes about all of it in his recent book "Bad City," and shares, on this week’s podcast, his anatomy of the investigation.
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Paul Pringle's story of peril and power in L.A. Paul Pringle is a long-time investigative reporter for the Los Angeles Times and a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner. His series of stories uncovering the drug use and criminal behavior of the dean of USC’s Keck School of Medicine shifted the tectonic plates of both USC and Pringle’s employer, the L.A. Times. It’s a story of the power of investigative journalism, and the role of powerful institutions in a big city like Los Angeles. He writes about all of it in his recent book "Bad City," and shares, on this week’s podcast, his anatomy of the investigation.
Erica Gies explains why water always wins Erica Gies is a Bay Area native, a National Geographic Explorer, an independent environmental journalist, and the author, most recently, of "Water Always Wins: Thriving in an Age of Drought and Deluge." Gies details how we have over-engineered and mechanized water delivery in California. She explains how both our agriculture and our built environment have done almost irreparable damage to the future of our water supply. Based on her observations around the world, she tells us about "slow water" and offers some solutions and limited hope for the future.
Diane Zimmerman remembers the Nut Tree Diane Power Zimmerman's great grandfather bought the property that would become the Nut Tree. Her grandparents founded and ran the roadside oasis that opened in Vacaville in 1921. Turning to a lighter note this week, we look at what was once the iconic stop on car journeys from San Francisco to Sacramento and Tahoe. The Nut Tree, in its heyday, reflected the intersection of midcentury design and Sunset Magazine’s western ethos. The forerunner of the roadside fruit stand, it attracted renowned guests while it spawned innovations in design, dining, and hospitality.
Gale Holland & Claire Hannah Collins: Inside their LA Times Story on Mckenzie Trahan When L.A. Times reporter Gale Holland and videographer Claire Hanna Collins met Mckenzie Trahan in 2018, she was 22 years old, seven months pregnant, and living in a tent above the 101 Freeway. Their recently published reporting project on Trahan, who had been living on the streets of Hollywood since she was 13, reminds us that stories about the homeless and the mean streets of our cities are more than just stories about policy: They are most importantly about people.
Jim Hinch on drugs, homelessness, and California policies Journalist Jim Hinch tries to look objectively at what is and isn't working with respect to our state's policies surrounding the nexus of housing and drugs. In a recent story in Zocalo, Hinch notes the fact that 50% of America's unhoused population lives in just three states — California, Oregon, and Washington. In this week's podcast, he compares and explains policies such as "harm reduction," "housing first," "supportive housing initiatives," "drug decriminalization," and 12-Step faith-based sobriety programs.
Gary Kamiya on what is happening to San Francisco Gary Kamiya, a long-time San Francisco writer and journalist, in a recent article in the Atlantic, zeros in on the tectonic political shifts resulting from San Francisco's voters' recall of three school board members and the district attorney. While few cities have personified the progressive vision more than San Francisco, Kamiya says there seem to be limits to its progressive agenda.  Is it a harbinger for other "blue" cities?
David Koepp turns out the lights David Koepp, one of our most distinguished and prolific screenwriters, turns to the novel for his latest work, "Aurora." Springboarding from our fear of over-dependence on technology, he creates a story sure to scare PG&E, Southern California Edison, and utility companies everywhere. Soon to be a major motion picture from director Kathryn Bigelow, Koepp redefines what "being prepared" really means, whether for the next pandemic, earthquake, or fire.
Alexa Koenig leads U.C. Berkeley's Human Right Center ​​Alexa Koenig is using Silicon Valley tech for the prosecution of war crimes. As the executive director of the Human Rights Center at the University of California, Berkeley, she is proving how the device that each of us has in our pockets and which gives us the ability to bear witness to the world might be used to help secure international justice. At a time when atrocities from Ukraine to Uganda are being documented like never before, Koenig, a product of Marin, UCLA, UC Berkeley, and the University of San Francisco School of Law, is evolving the framework for professionals to use social media and other digital tools to strengthen human rights advocacy and accountability.
Matt Richtel on inspired California In his new book "Inspired," Matt Richtel gets to the heart of why so much of the future seems to happen in California. In this week's podcast, he discusses where creativity comes from and why it gives the state a competitive advantage. Like opposable thumbs, the ability to imagine the future is what makes us human. It is the source of our creativity, our anxiety, and our fulfillment.
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