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Cell Podcast

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Cell (www.cell.com) is a peer-reviewed journal publishing the most interesting discoveries in biology. Continue Reading >>
Cell (www.cell.com) is a peer-reviewed journal publishing the most interesting discoveries in biology. << Show Less
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June 2018: Caught the flu? Eat fiber In this edition, we’ll hear about how heritability traits can be inferred from electronic medical records, with Nick Tatonetti and Fernanda Polubriaginof,&nbsp;Cell (00:00); why fiber does wonders for your immune system, with Benjamin Marsland,&nbsp;Immunity (9:56); and what’s behind the high- energy demands of mining Bitcoin, with Alex de Vries,&nbsp;Joule (18:56).
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June 2018: Caught the flu? Eat fiber In this edition, we’ll hear about how heritability traits can be inferred from electronic medical records, with Nick Tatonetti and Fernanda Polubriaginof,&nbsp;Cell (00:00); why fiber does wonders for your immune system, with Benjamin Marsland,&nbsp;Immunity (9:56); and what’s behind the high- energy demands of mining Bitcoin, with Alex de Vries,&nbsp;Joule (18:56).
May 2018: The Loneliest Mouse In this episode, we’ll hear about why you might want to be skeptical of raw water, with Gail Teitzel, Editor of Trends in Microbiology (00:00); how brain chemistry might change in mice as a result of social isolation, with David Anderson,&nbsp;Cell (07:45); and what’s unusual about neurons in people with severe obesity, with Dhruv Sareen,&nbsp;Cell Stem Cell (17:10). Then, stay tuned for our monthly news roundup, including using MRI to predict risk tolerance; rethinking what we know about genetics, sugar, and weight gain; and how the sweet potato arrived in Polynesia (26:13).
April 2018: The Me Generation In this episode, we’ll hear about when children start to think about their reputations with Ike Silver,&nbsp;Trends in Cognitive Sciences (00:00); an indigenous people in Indonesia whose unusually large spleens enhance their free-diving ability with Melissa Ilardo, Cell&nbsp;(08:56); how the&nbsp;Pan-Cancer Atlas was put together, with Bob Kruger, Deputy Editor of Cell (17:55); and what’s unique about iScience, Cell Press’s newest research journal, with its Lead Editor Stefano Tonzani and Publisher Simanta Buck (24:10). Then, stay tuned for our monthly news roundup, including graphene hair dye, adaptive behaviors in the mouse brain, and improving indoor air quality with plants (32:20).
March 2018: On the Steps of the Walking Fish In this edition, we'll hear about new methods to monitor cannabis use, with Marilyn Heustis,&nbsp;Trends in Molecular Medicine (00:00); old tales of rabbit’s domestication, with Greger Larson,&nbsp;Trends in Ecology &amp; Evolution (12:19); &quot;walking fish&quot; and the neural origins of land locomotion, with Jeremy Dasen,&nbsp;Cell (20:14); and how to balance safety and civil rights in access to personal genomic data, with Barbara Evans,&nbsp;AJHG (27:05). And this month’s news roundup: deep learning retinal diseases, wood carbon sponges, and batteries that withstand the coldest temperatures (36:15).
February 2018: CSI: Rhino In this episode, we’ll hear about using DNA forensics to combat rhinoceros poaching, with Cindy Harper,&nbsp;Current Biology (00:00); how to save energy simply by staying at home, with Ashok Sekar,&nbsp;Joule (09:14); and how Cell Press is leading the way in transparency and openness in scientific publication, with Debbie Sweet, Vice President of Editorial at Cell Press (14:14). We’ll also hear a roundup of lab-grown hairy skin, surprising social preferences among bonobos, and universality in human song (22:41).
An Interview with Emilie Marcus Listen to a sendoff interview with Emilie Marcus, as she recounts her personal trajectory as CEO and Editor-in-Chief of Cell, and reflects on the philosophy and strategy of Cell Press in today’s ground of scientific publishing.
January 2018: Don’t Waste Your Yogurt In this edition, we’ll hear about a new technique to inject information into the brain of monkeys, with Kevin Mazurek and Marc Schieber,&nbsp;Neuron (00:00); how to convert yogurt waste into biofuels, with Lars Angenent,&nbsp;Joule (9:31); why should we eat a high-fiber diet, with Fredrik B&auml;ckhed,&nbsp;Cell Host &amp; Microbe (16:45); and how CRISPR holds promise for epigenetic therapies, with Hsin-Kai Liao,&nbsp;Cell (22:09).
December 2017: Lessons from the Animal World In this edition, we’ll explore the reasons why so many mammoth skeletons are male, with Love Dal&eacute;n,&nbsp;Current Biology (00:00); what happens to dwarf mongooses when they immigrate to another community, with Andrew Radford,&nbsp;Current Biology (9:25); and an accidental experiment in open-access publishing from Cell Reports, with Editor Stephen Matheson (16:30).
November 2017: Clean Living In this edition, we’ll hear about a new technique to store clean energy with Yet-Ming Chiang,&nbsp;Joule (00:00); how gut bacteria in wild mice are different from lab mice and what that means for interpreting research, with Stephan Rosshart and Barbara Rehermann,&nbsp;Cell (9:25); and why your paper may be taking a long time in peer review and what you can do about it (16:30).
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