Group 4 Created with Sketch.
Vurbl Ambassador
Vurbl Verified Station

The Deep-Sea Podcast

Play All
4554 Listens
12 Subscribers
Share Path Report
A couple of deep-sea scientists talk everything deep sea! Interesting facts, recent news, myth-busting and interviews with the most interesting people we know. Continue Reading >>
A couple of deep-sea scientists talk everything deep sea! Interesting facts, recent news, myth-busting and interviews with the most interesting people we know. << Show Less
Ambassador of: Natural Sciences
Featured Audio
008 - Technology with James Cameron Working in the deep sea is entirely dependent on technology and the incredible forces push engineering to its limit. If you are doing something that no one has done before, chances are you are going to have to make some of your own tools. Unfortunately, we must spend a lot more on our equipment for the same data as shallower science. This makes funding difficult but also makes the deep sea quite an exclusive club.We are joined by James Cameron (yes, that one) to talk about solving the problems of working deep with new technology. He shares how he went about illuminating the Titanic and confesses that his films are often an outlet for the technology he wishes he could build. Some of the concepts coming in Avatar 2 are an example of this. Don Walsh joins us as ever to give his take on the importance of the engineering that allows us to do the things we do.In recent news, we have a new deep-sea fish, and it’s a beast with a very cool name. In honour of the Valentine’s day we talk about love in the deep sea with some different reproductive strategies. We take some listener questions and it Tails from the High Seas my old colleague Izzy talks about a wild storm and getting superstitious with your equipment. LinksNew giant slickheadVampire squid reproductionRattails spawningThe Crabsuit CreditsTheme – Hadal Zone Express by MärvelSound effects obtained from https://www.zapsplat.com
Snippets are a new way to share audio!
You can clip a small part of any file to share, add to playlist, and transcribe automatically. Just click the to create your snippet!
Top Snippets from The Deep-Sea Podcast
Deep-sea mining - interview with Michael Lodge, Secretary General of the International Seabed Authority Alan interviews Michael Lodge, Secretary General of the International Seabed Authority, the body with grants licences to explore and harvest deep-sea mining sites.
Podcasting From Over 10,000 Meters Under The Sea The Deep-Sea Podcast is the deepest podcast around! Professor Alan interviews sub pilot Tim Macdonald at over 10 km down in the Philippine Trench. This is the first time humans have been to the bottom of this trench and it's where Hadal (deeper than 6 km down) research stated with the Galathea Expedition.
The Secret Life of Sponges Scientists have discovered that hundred-year-old artic sea sponges—previously thought to be immobile—are moving around. What does this mean about the secret life of sponges, do they go on gap years? What, if anything, is coordinating their activities? We may not have the answers, yet, but we suspect it's vaguely sinister.
How Big Was Megalodon Really? Theories about megalodon's size have reached up to 120 feet in the popular imagination, but what can a cryptozoologist tell us about the accuracy of these estimates? The image most people have of megalodon—that of a hundred-foot shark larger than a city bus—was drawn from a study done in the 1950s. These days, researchers using modern technology believe that the megs was closer to 40-60 feet in length.
You can't say that on TV! Dr Thom gives his mom a call to let her know he's going to be on a documentary. Unfortunately, from hours of interview, this is what they went with. (his mom was still proud)
Don Walsh On Why He Traveled to the Bottom of the Sea Listen to Captain Don Walsh of the United States Navy explain why he joined captain Jean-Luc Picard on the first trip to the bottom of the Mariana Trench. Don says that it's been sixty years since his legendary dive, and people are still asking him the same questions about the dive. But the one question they never ask is, "Why?" To which the answer is, knowledge.
Be the avatar James Cameron talks about the importance of 'bearing witness' to the deep sea.
Playlists
Seaspiracy - groundbreaking documentary, oversimplification or propaganda? The Netflix documentary Seaspiracy paints a grim picture of global ocean health, leaping from topics as varied as plastic pollution, slavery, whale hunting, fish farming and industrial fishing.
Many experts (even those that appear in it) have criticised the film for oversimplifying the issues and drawing cause and effect where there isn't any.

This playlist includes experts discussing the film and the claims made in it and then moves into more general discussion about the film's motivation or agenda.
The Deep-Sea Podcast
Deep-Sea Mining: A Look At Both Sides of the Issue Deep-sea mining, the removal of valuable minerals from the seabed, is rapidly becoming a reality.
It's an extremely complex topic with a lot to consider. This playlist tries to voice the multiple sides as fairly as possible.
The Deep-Sea Podcast
Scientists You may not have heard of our guest, but they're a science legend we would love you to meet. The Deep-Sea Podcast
Celeb guests Some of the bigger names we have had on the show The Deep-Sea Podcast
Our perception of the deep sea Why do we feel the way we do about the deep sea? We talk to creatives and a psychologists about what the deep sea means to people The Deep-Sea Podcast
Newest Audio
026 – Vision in the deep sea with Justin Marshall Read the show notes and find out more about us at:
https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/026-vision
 
After recovering from you-know-what last episode, we’re excited to complete our open-water/pelagic trilogy with this week’s guest Professor Justin Marshall. Justin is an expert on all things vision, and talks us through all of the intricacies and oddities of vision in the deep sea. We discuss how fish eyes have evolved in order to adapt to the darkness of the deep, and how exactly they are able to see bioluminescence. Justin’s research has been highly influential, so we ask him more about his discoveries of mantis shrimp vision, and how he found out that cephalopods were colour-blind!
We also couldn’t let him leave without getting some of the stories from his time living in the Atlantis underwater habitat for weeks, and how this led to somewhat horrifying fungal consequences.
The deep sea has seen a flurry of activity this month with lots of news to cover! Our favourite cryptozoologist, Tyler Greenfield is at the epicentre of a monster-misunderstanding. Thom’s upset as yet another innocent fish is labelled the ‘ugliest creature ever seen’ by fishermen, but this time it’s a more familiar face. We also cover some more paleo-news with surprising historical deep-sea temperatures and the discovery of new brine pools in the Red Sea. Alan gives us an insight into his upcoming adventures at sea and we find out why he isn’t the biggest fan of documentarians.
It wouldn’t be the Deep-Sea Podcast without checking in with Don Walsh as he talks us through the history of submarine windows. And we also hear from a listener and find out what snailfish and The Kardashians have in common…
 
 
Check out our podcast merch! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron.
 
Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or your own tales from the high seas on:
podcast@armatusoceanic.com
We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note!
 
We are also on
Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO
Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic
Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic
 
Glossary
Abyssopelagic – open water 4-6 km (13,000 to 20,000 ft) deep
Bathypelagic – also known as the midnight zone, open water roughly 1-4 km (3,300-13,000 ft) deep
Bathytheuthis berryi – A deep sea squid which has been observed brooding eggs
Coprophage – An animal that eats poop
Cryptozoology – The study of species whose existence is rumoured or disputed.
Euphotic zone – the surface and well-illuminated zone
Hadalpelagic – open water >6 km deep
Loch Ness – A loch (large freshwater lake) in the Scottish Highlands which is best known for the alleged sightings of the ‘Loch Ness Monster’ since 1933.
Mesopelagic – also called the twilight zone, starts where 1% of light reaches and ends where there is none, roughly 200-1,000 m (656-3,280 ft) deep
Monkfish – A wide-mouthed commonly-found fish who perhaps isn’t the most beautiful, but definitely could be considered tasty.
Pelagic – open ocean, away from the shore and the bottom
Photic zone – the depth that light penetrates
Rod/Cone cells – two types of photoreceptors which are used by animals to detect light to be able to ‘see’.
Underwater habitat – A structure created to allow people to live underwater for extended periods. Often used for research by aquatic biologists.

Links
We Build Spaceships
Spotify
YouTube
 
Justin's Research Group
Justin also has a citizen science program called Coral Watch which allows divers to report on coral health
 
Tyler’s blog on cryptozoology and his Twitter @TylerGreenfieId
 
News article dubbing yet another innocent fish as ‘the ugliest thing fisherman has ever seen’.
 
News article o
PRESSURISED: 025 – Bioluminescence with Edie Widder Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 25. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be!
 
Read the show notes and find the full episode here:
https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/025-biolum
 
Last episode we learned about the pelagic zone, the largest habitat on earth, a boundless 3D space where enormous migrations take place. We learned that this isn’t a world of darkness but rather one of biological light, where bioluminescence is used to attack, to defend and to communicate. While producing your own light may seem alien to us, it is likely the most common form of communication on the planet.
To learn more about this world we speak with Edie Widder, who has studied bioluminescence for her whole career and used the same adaptations found in the animals to design her own equipment. She developed the Eye in the Sea, a camera system invisible to most deep-sea animals, and a lure which emulated a bioluminescent jellyfish, the e-jelly. The gear worked extremely well and along with a lot of behaviours observed for the first time this also captured the first footage of the giant squid, Architeuthis dux.
In recent news we talk about how plate tectonics impact our climate, what we can learn from the evolution of cave animals and generating power from the thermocline. Don Walsh tells us why these bioluminescent creatures are a nuisance to submarines.
 
Check out our podcast merch!
 
Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on:
podcast@armatusoceanic.com
We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note!
 
We are also on
Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO
 
Facebook: DeepSeaPodcast, ArmatusOceanic
 
Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic
 
 
Links
Alien species invasion of deep-sea bacteria into mouse gut microbiota
 
 Plate tectonics and climate
Paper
 
Blind cave animal evolution
 
Power generation from deep, cold water
 
Edith (Edie) Widder
Wikipedia
ORCA
Cookie-cutter shark paper
Below the Edge of Darkness
 
Credits
Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel
 
Glossary
Bioluminescence – Biologically generated light
Cenozoic era – 50 million years ago when the earth started cooling
Cretaceous hothouse – 145-66 million years ago where temperatures were 10°C
Deep Worker – a small, single person sub
Electronic jellyfish – A bioluminescent bait
Esca – The lure on anglerfish
Eye in the sea – A red light illuminated camera with a electronic jellyfish as bait
Fermi bubbles – Listen to the end
Magnapinna – The genus of the bigfin squid
Marine snow – The biological material (bodies, poop and shells) singing into the deep sea
Moribund – Something that is dying and cannot be saved
Olm – A type of blind cave salamander
Photomultiplier – Tech that boosts very weak sources of light
Promachoteuthis – The genus of squid that was seen on Edie’s camera system
Squid jig – A lure used to fish for squid
Stoplight fish - Deep-sea dragonfishes of the genus Malacosteus that can both see and produce red light
Thermocline – layer of sudden temperature change in the sea
Tubeshoulder – Deep-sea fish with a specialised organ that squirts bioluminescent material
Wasp suit – A deep-sea diving suit
PRESSURISED: 024 – The pelagic deep sea with Tracey Sutton Our short and to the point PRESSURISED version of episode 24. If you don't have time for the full episode and want to get right to the science without any of our waffle, this is the place to be!
 
Read the show notes and find the full episode here:
https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/024-pelagic
 
We have a confession to make. We talk a big game about how we are busting myths, tackling deep-sea tropes and showing the deep ocean as it really is… but we have been guilty of one of the big ones. The deep sea is not just the bottom! Most of the deep sea, in fact, most of the habitat of this planet is the huge open 3D environment of open water or ‘pelagic’ water. In this staggering volume the planets largest migration takes place twice a day. Animals are locked in an evolutionary arms race, using their own light to deceive and trick. Finding a meal is rare, finding a mate is rare and life is without boundaries. These factors have led to some truly wild evolution.
We hear from Don about hunting for the 'deep scattering layer' (DSL) before we even knew what it was.
In recent news we cover Edith Widder and her new book Below the Edge of Darkness, underwater GPS through the power of a pong, following the yellow brick road to meet the deep-sea wizard and some lovely new footage of a highfin dragonfish.
 
Check out our podcast merch! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron.
 
Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on:
podcast@armatusoceanic.com
We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note!
 
We are also on
Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO
 
Facebook: ArmatusOceanic
 
Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic
 
Read the show notes and find out more about us at:
www.armatusoceanic.com
 
Glossary
Abyssopelagic – open water 4-6 km (13,000 to 20,000 ft) deep
Aphotic zone – depths deeper than life penetrates
Bathypelagic – also known as the midnight zone, open water roughly 1-4 km (3,300-13,000 ft) deep
Benthic – associated with the bottom, how we usually think about the deep sea
Deep Scattering Layer (DSL) – a ‘false bottom’ created on sonar by huge numbers of open water animals
Dragonfish – deep-sea predators of the family Stomiidae
Dysphotic zone – the depth that light still penetrates but photosynthesis is becoming unviable
Euphotic zone – the surface and well illuminated zone
Hadalpelagic – open water >6 km deep
Mesopelagic – also called the twilight zone, starts where 1% of light reaches and ends where there is none, roughly 200-1,000 m (656-3,280 ft) deep
Myctophids – Lanternfish, fish responsible for the biggest carbon movements on the planet
Nictoepipelagic – The wink on the open sea. Great word for these vertical migrators
Pelagic – open ocean, away from the shore and the bottom
Photic zone – the depth that light penetrates
Vertical migration – the twice daily migration of deep-sea animals up to the surface to feed
 
Links
Tracey’s lab website
The synthesis paper of a decade of research into the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Open access
Carbon export model for mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Mexico
 
Edith Widder
Eye in the ocean
Edith’s new book
Vox podcast
 
Underwater GPS
Yellow-brick Road
 
Credits
Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel
025 – Bioluminescence with Edie Widder https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/025-biolum
 
Sorry that this episode isn’t the perfectly polished jewel that this show usually is. Thom’s family got a visit from both COVID and chickenpox so there hasn’t been the time or energy to edit as well as he usually does. But we couldn’t abandon you without an episode this month as some great stuff is still covered.
 
Last episode we leaned about the pelagic zone, the largest habitat on earth, a boundless 3D space where enormous migrations take place. We learned that this isn’t a world of darkness but rather one of biological light, where bioluminescence is used to attack, to defend and to communicate. While producing your own light may seem alien to us, it is likely the most common form of communication on the planet.
 
To learn more about this world we speak with Edie Widder, who has studied bioluminescence for her whole career and used the same adaptations found in the animals to design her own equipment. She developed the Eye in the Sea, a camera system invisible to most deep-sea animals, and a lure which emulated a bioluminescent jellyfish, the e-jelly. The gear worked extremely well and along with a lot of behaviours observed for the first time this also captured the first footage of the giant squid, Architeuthis dux.
 
In recent news we talk about how plate tectonics impact our climate, what we can learn from the evolution of cave animals and generating power from the thermocline. We hear from a listener about their bigfin squid archive. Larkin drops by to tell us what a ‘Tron Dolphin’ and Don Walsh tells us why those same Tron Dolphins are a nuisance to submarines.
 
Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own comments on:
podcast@armatusoceanic.com
We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note!
 
We are also on
Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO
Facebook: ArmatusOceanic
Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic
 
Read the show notes and find out more about us at:
www.armatusoceanic.com
Check out our podcast merch!
 
Glossary
Bioluminescence – Biologically generated light
Cenozoic era – 50 million years ago when the earth started cooling
Cretaceous hothouse – 145-66 million years ago where temperatures were 10°C
Deep Worker – a small, single person sub
Electronic jellyfish – A bioluminescent bait
Esca – The lure on anglerfish
Eye in the sea – A red light illuminated camera with a electronic jellyfish as bait
Fermi bubbles – Listen to the end
Magnapinna – The genus of the bigfin squid
Marine snow – The biological material (bodies, poop and shells) singing into the deep sea
Moribund – Something that is dying and cannot be saved
Olm – A type of blind cave salamander
Photomultiplier – Tech that boosts very weak sources of light
Promachoteuthis – The genus of squid that was seen on Edie’s camera system
Squid jig – A lure used to fish for squid
Stoplight fish - Deep-sea dragonfishes of the genus Malacosteus that can both see and produce red light
Thermocline – layer of sudden temperature change in the sea
Tubeshoulder – Deep-sea fish with a specialised organ that squirts bioluminescent material
Wasp suit – A deep-sea diving suit
 
Links
Mötley Crüe - Hooligan's Holiday
Video
Spotify
 
Finding the Samule B Roberts, deepest wreck.
 
Tyler Greenfield on Twitter
 
Alien species invasion of deep-sea bacteria into mouse gut microbiota
 
Plate tectonics and climate
Paper
 
Blind cave animal evolution
 
<
024 – The pelagic deep sea with Tracey Sutton https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/024-pelagic
 
We have a confession to make. We talk a big game about how we are busting myths, tackling deep-sea tropes and showing the deep ocean as it really is… but we have been guilty of one of the big ones. The deep sea is not just the bottom! Most of the deep sea, in fact, most of the habitat of this planet is the huge open 3D environment of open water or ‘pelagic’ water. In this staggering volume the planets largest migration takes place twice a day. Animals are locked in an evolutionary arms race, using their own light to deceive and trick. Finding a meal is rare, finding a mate is rare and life is without boundaries. These factors have led to some truly wild evolution.
We also tackle a couple of listener questions: Whatever happened to the word ‘nictoepipelagic’ which seems to have vanished from scientific writing? We also discuss parasites in the deep sea, how can they find a specific host when the animals are so spread out? We hear from Don about hunting for the 'deep scattering layer' (DSL) before we even knew what it was and find out where Larkin has been from her new vessel on the Gulf of Mexico.
 
In recent news we cover Edith Widder and her new book Below the Edge of Darkness, underwater GPS through the power of a pong, following the yellow brick road to meet the deep-sea wizard and some lovely new footage of a highfin dragonfish.
We also find ourselves talking about how the deep sea is portrayed in children’s books and learn that apparently zesty citrus and floral smells are associated with the deep ocean… who knew?!
 
Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on:
podcast@armatusoceanic.com
We’d love to actually play your voice so feel free to record a short audio note!
 
We are also on
Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO
Facebook: ArmatusOceanic
Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic
 
Read the show notes and find out more about us at:
www.armatusoceanic.com
 
Glossary
Abyssopelagic – open water 4-6 km (13,000 to 20,000 ft) deep
Aphotic zone – depths deeper than life penetrates
Bathypelagic – also known as the midnight zone, open water roughly 1-4 km (3,300-13,000 ft) deep
Benthic – associated with the bottom, how we usually think about the deep sea
Deep Scattering Layer (DSL) – a ‘false bottom’ created on sonar by huge numbers of open water animals
Dragonfish – deep-sea predators of the family Stomiidae
Dysphotic zone – the depth that light still penetrates but photosynthesis is becoming unviable
Euphotic zone – the surface and well illuminated zone
Hadalpelagic – open water >6 km deep
Mesopelagic – also called the twilight zone, starts where 1% of light reaches and ends where there is none, roughly 200-1,000 m (656-3,280 ft) deep
Myctophids – Lanternfish, fish responsible for the biggest carbon movements on the planet
Nictoepipelagic – The wink on the open sea. Great word for these vertical migrators
Pelagic – open ocean, away from the shore and the bottom
Photic zone – the depth that light penetrates
Vertical migration – the twice daily migration of deep-sea animals up to the surface to feed
 
Links
Tracey’s lab website
The synthesis paper of a decade of research into the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Open access
Carbon export model for mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Mexico
 
Rosetta stoned by TOOL
Youtube
Spotify
 
Edith Widder
Eye in the ocean
Edith’s new book
Vox podcast
 
Underwater GPS
 
Yellow-brick Road
<a href="https://www
023 – Keeping deep-Sea animals with The Monterey Bay Aquarium https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/023-deep-aquaria
 
Can we safely bring deep-sea organisms to the surface and keep them alive? Certain species, such as the giant isopods and giant Japanese spider crabs have been kept in aquaria in the past but the number of animals we can maintain long-term is quite small. The Monterey Bay Aquarium’s new Into the Deep exhibition has succeeded in keeping animals never before put on public display, some are even new to science. Not only that, but they have even had some success in getting them to reproduce! Figuring out what conditions these animals need and observing them over long periods will allow us to learn huge amounts about animals we usually only get a glimpse of. We talk with aquarists Ellen Umeda and Michelle Kaiser and life-support engineer Brian Maurer about the years of work that went into keeping these animals and giving the public a very personal deep-sea experience.
In the rest of the episode, Alan is back in the UK and we get to record in ‘the very quiet room’. We discuss data sharing and the complexities of charging for data that may otherwise not be taken, visiting the Explorers Club in New York and language barriers within science.
I also call Alan’s bluff and present him with a lovely Deep-Sea Podcast apron which he then proceeds to wear in Hell’s Kitchen in New York.
We hear from a listener about how the podcast helped them through a difficult time and answer a listener question about the danger of entanglement for undersea vehicles. If you’d like to record a question or comment please do and send it to the email below. We would love to include you on the show.
 
Check out our podcast merch! Which now includes Alan’s beloved apron.
 
Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on:
podcast@armatusoceanic.com
 
We are also on
Twitter: @DeepSeaPod, @ArmatusO
Facebook: ArmatusOceanic
Instagram: @deepsea_podcast, @armatusoceanic
 
Glossary
AUV – Autonomous Underwater Vehicle
Gravid – the animal is full of eggs and getting close to spawning
Laminar flow – a simple water flow, no eddies
ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle
Spawning – release of eggs and sperm
Vertical migrator – animals that rise up from the deep sea at night to feed at the surface
Links
Our new merch!
 
Let ‘Em Go by The Wildhearts
Spotify
Video
 
The Explorers Club
 
TMAO in molecular machines
 
Mapping the ocean floor
 
Scientific Tower of Babel
 
Into the Deep:
Aquarium YouTube Channel
Online exhibition
Deep-sea adaptation story with video
Bioluminescence story with video
Animal information story
Exhibition development with life support diagram
 
Credits
Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel
Logo image
Bloody-belly comb jelly – Monterey Bay Aquarium
022 – Live-streaming the deep with Kasey Cantwell https://www.armatusoceanic.com/podcast/022-dive-streaming
 
One of the most exciting parts of our job is going to places that no one has ever been before and seeing things that no one has ever seen. It turns out, we were making that far harder than it needs to be, we can do all this from home! Several of the big names in deep-sea exploration live-stream (or dive-stream if we’re being cute). With just a few seconds delay, you can see deep-sea exploration as it happens and may be present for very significant finds. You never know what you’re going to find down there.
The big players in this space are the Schmidt Ocean Institute, Nautilus Live from the Ocean Exploration Trust and Ocean Exploration/Okeanos Explorer from NOAA. We are lucky enough to chat with Kasey Cantwell, the Operations Chief of the NOAA Ocean Exploration Expeditions and Exploration Division. We talk about the amazing opportunities this new way of doing science presents. From allowing 300 experts to take part, to swapping out your expert team when you find something unexpected and even the physical and societal barriers that can be removed. But it’s not just about getting science done, it’s about sharing these experiences with everyone. Online communities are forming around these streams and illustrations, poetry and memes are just as valid outputs.
 
In recent news we hear how preparations are going for Alan’s upcoming cruise. We talk about the octopus garden providing a nice warm spot to brood eggs, living underwater for long periods of time and the evolution of early vamperoids.
No episode would be complete without our regular check-in with Don Walsh to hear about his involvement with the early days of ROV and AUV research.
Check out our podcast merch! Please do send in any pics of you wearing the merch. We find the idea of real people in the actual world wearing this so surreal!
We also have a UK-based job advertised. Why not come and help us with the podcast and some other fun stuff. More details here.
Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on:
podcast@armatusoceanic.com
 
We are also on
Twitter: @ArmatusO
Facebook: ArmatusOceanic
Instagram: @armatusoceanic
 
Read the show notes and find out more about us at:
www.armatusoceanic.com
 
Glossary
AUV – Autonomous Underwater Vehicle
Berth – Beds available onboard a ship basically
Manganese nodule – potato shaped balls of metal that form on the seabed, the focus of deep-sea mining
ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicle
Taxonomist – A specialist in categorising a specific group of species.
Telepresence – Live-streaming what you’re doing on the internet
 
Links
Our new merch!
 
Tangaroa by Alien Weaponry
YouTube
Spotify
 
Octopus brooding in warm water
Article
Conference abstract
 
Living under the sea
Fabien Cousteau (Jacques Cousteau’s grandson) undersea live-in labs
Aquarious undersea lab
Two weeks under the sea
 
Earliest vampire squid
Article
Paper
 
Discovery of Shackleton’s ship, the Endurance
Paper that predicted that it would be intact
 
The Galathea Legacy - book - JohnQuentin.com
 
Start dive-streami
021 – Collaborative data repositories and AI with Kakani Katija We have often talked about how difficult it is the get data from the deep sea… but would you believe that the bottleneck to our understanding of the deep ocean, at least as far as visual data, is processing those images? Turning a picture of the deep sea into a list of species, habitat type, sediment type etc. is a time-consuming process that requires a wide range of skilled people.

Due to time/funding constrains a lot of valuable information is lost. A team looking at a specific question will have lots of information in their data that other teams could use.

A picture is worth a thousand data points.

We chat with Dr Kakani Katija, the co-founder of FathomNet, an open-source repository for labelled deep-sea imaging data. The platform is still in beta but it is hoped that it will allow scientists to easily and usefully share their amassed data in a single and easily searchable place.

But what about that processing bottleneck? The tech-savvy listener may have noticed that a massive collection of labelled image data is exactly the sort of thing you need to train a Machine Learning or Deep Learning algorithm. Can we automate a lot of the time-consuming image processing and let the experts focus on the new and unusual stuff? It’s at this cutting edge that things get exciting and we may be at the cusp of a marine science renaissance.

We have all our usual nonsense. Alan continues to find things in Australia that want to kill him. We answer some listener questions on deep-sea fish memory and Thom and Alan’s origin story. We also hear from Don about his time on the cruise ships. A decidedly un-deep-sea segment but it could be considered ‘adventure’ on the high seas.

We also launch our podcast merch! Please do send in any pics of you wearing the merch. We find the idea of real people in the actual world wearing this so surreal!



Feel free to get in touch with us with questions or you own tales from the high seas on:

podcast@armatusoceanic.com

 

We are also on

Twitter: @ArmatusO

 

Facebook: ArmatusOceanic

 

Instagram: @armatusoceanic

 

Read the show notes and find out more about us at:

www.armatusoceanic.com

 

Glossary
Artificial Intelligence (AI) – A science dedicated to making machines think in an intelligent way, mirroring a biological brain.

Data pipeline – A path that raw data follows to become useful information.

Deep Learning – a more complex subset of ML that mirrors the way a brain works

Machine Learning (ML) – computers learning to perform a task without being explicitly programmed to do so

ML/AI model or algorithm – A model that has been trained on real data and can now process new data itself.

Online Repository – A database stored online so that people can access it from anywhere

Open Source – A publicly accessible design that people can freely repurpose and adapt.

Visual data – photos or video as a form of scientific data

 

Links
Our new merch!

 

Abyssal EDNA article and Paper

 

Our Angola fish paper and the Open access version

 

Kakani’s Twitter

 

FathomNet goodies
The FathomNet website – have an explore of the labelled deep-sea critter data

FathomNet GitHub – take a peek under the hood or even get involved

FathomNet articles with tutorials/explanations

Helpful video tutorials

Paper

NOAA Science Seminar, 8 March 2022 1200-1300 PST (UTC-8)

Register now!

FathomNet Workshop, 31 March & 1 April 2022 0800-1100 PST (UTC-8)

Register now!

 

Internet of Elepha
020 – Love in the deep sea with Craig Young It’s February, the month of love and there’s love in the deep ocean too. We talk reproductive strategies in the deep sea with Professor Craig Young, Dr Autun Purser and Dr Mike Vecchione. How do you find a mate in the sparsely populated deep ocean? How can egg and sperm meet when you are fixed growing on a rock? How can your babies disperse and find a suitable habitat, especially if you live in a rare habitat like a hydrothermal vent? We find the solutions to all these problems and more.

We also have our regular contributors. Dr Don Walsh shares how a dolphin entourage isn’t a good thing if you’re trying to be a quiet and sneaky sub. Larkin also shares how it’s difficult to keep romance on the DL when you live in the tight confines of a ship, people do love to gossip.

In recent news, we announce the launch of Alan’s Deep-Sea Research centre but get distracted by the retired yob of a bird, the Kookaburra. We also consider starting a side-hustle selling dirty deep-sea bottled water and discuss a massive icefish nesting ground found in Antarctica.

We answer Maya’s listener question, ‘are there deep-sea-sons?’ Do they even know it is the month of romance?

Feel free to get in touch with questions or you own tales from the high seas on:

podcast@armatusoceanic.com

 

We are also on

Twitter: @ArmatusO

Facebook: ArmatusOceanic

Instagram: @armatusoceanic

Read the show notes and find out more about us at:

www.armatusoceanic.com

 

Glossary
Abyssal plain – the wide-open spaces of the deep sea, most of the planet

Filter feeder – animal that feeds by filtering the water e.g., sponge

Gametes – the reproductive cells, eggs and sperm

Gonad – the organ that produces the gametes

Hadal trench – the deep-sea trenches more than 6 km deep

Hermaphrodite – both male and female simultaneously

Sessile – animals that cannot move (opposite of mobile)

 

Links
Launch of Minderoo-UWA Deep-Sea Research Centre

Deep-Ocean bottled water

First humans to the bottom of the Atacama Trench

Massive icefish breeding ground paper

Seasons in the Abyss by Slayer

Ecosystems of the World – Craig has a great chapter on reproduction in this book

Paper - Estimating dispersal distance in the deep sea: challenges and applications to marine reserves

Paper - Reproduction, Larval Biology, and Recruitment of the Deep-Sea Benthos

Paper - Hadal snailfish reproduction

Larkin’s YouTube channel My Salty Sea Life

 

Credits
Theme – Hadal Zone Express by Märvel

Logo image

Deep-sea Lizardfish, Bathysaurus ferox

Icefish nests
Load More Audio
Stations We Like
Skeptoid The true science behind our most popular urban legends. Historical mysteries, paranormal claims, popular science myths, aliens and UFO reports, conspiracy theories, and worthless alternative medicine schemes... Skeptoid has you covered. From the sublime to the startling, no topic is sacred. Weekly since 2006.
Strange Animals Podcast A podcast about living, extinct, and imaginary animals!
Marine Conservation Happy Hour The Marine Conservation Happy Hour is a podcast that looks at the many different sides of Marine Science and Conservation in an informal setting - a during a pub Happy Hour, chatting casually over a few (or more) drinks. The show is co-hosted by @DrScarlettSmash and @Craken_McCraic. Everyone is a marine scientist who is passionate about the Ocean, marine mammals (whales, seals, dolphins, porpoises, polar bears and more), sharks and other fish, invertebrates (especially squid & octopuses because they are cool), and other marine biology things that live under the sea. Join us as we gossip about, for example, how shows like Game of Thrones are similar to Marine Conservation, the sex lives of sea creatures, hot marine science & conservation topics of the week and learn about the challenges of attaining a marine biology or conservation career.

Podcast Owners, Creators, Producers, & Hosts: Dr Scarlett Smash and Dr Craken MacCraic.

You can support the show at: www.patreon.com/marineconservation

(c) ECM Parsons an
New Scientist: The Big Interview Hear the stories of influential people who've made their mark in the worlds of science and culture. Through in-depth conversations with notable figures, explore everything from climate change, to philosophy, space and biology. Produced by Right Angles. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
FishBase and SeaLifeBase Anniversary Podcast A limited series where the pioneers behind FishBase and SeaLifeBase talk about the mission of these online global biodiversity information systems.

Created to celebrate the 30th anniversary of FishBase and 15th anniversary of SeaLifeBase.
The Guide to Mindful Conservation: Dancing in Pink Hiking Boots This podcast is for professionals in the conservation practitioners or citizen scientists. Trying to save the environment and its species can be challenging, frustrating, stressful and depressing-how do we cope with this? Join Dr. Scarlett Smash, an environmental science/marine conservation scientist and yogi practitioner on a journey of self-care. It is important to becoming a mindful conservationist, connecting conservation and holistic healing to provoke and awaken a wholeness in one’s self which leads to sustainable happiness and efficiency.

Podcast Creator, Executive Producer, Host, Editor: Dr. Ashley Scarlett
New Scientist Weekly Keep up with the latest scientific developments and breakthroughs in this award winning weekly podcast from the team at New Scientist, the world’s most popular weekly science and technology magazine. Each discussion centers around three of the most fascinating stories to hit the headlines each week. From technology, to space, health and the environment, we share all the information you need to keep pace. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
Catch Our Drift The podcast for people who love the sea. Join Oliver Steeds and Helen Scales every two weeks as they set off on a journey to explore the massive, life-giving and vital ocean. They will be examining how the ocean seeps into so many parts of all of our lives by talking with chefs, film makers, actors, writers, athletes, astronauts and more. Each episode there will be uplifting, inspiring and surprising stories about the sea. They'll investigate ocean problems but also look at the solutions and be asking what each of us can do to help fix the many urgent issues and help to protect the sea.