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Whether you're an integrator, a designer or simply a label-defying creative, the EXPERIENCE is everything. Host Bryan Meszaros explores the story behind the exhibit to understand how a carefully crafted experience traps into the human experience to connect people to place. Continue Reading >>
Whether you're an integrator, a designer or simply a label-defying creative, the EXPERIENCE is everything. Host Bryan Meszaros explores the story behind the exhibit to understand how a carefully crafted experience traps into the human experience to connect people to place. << Show Less
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Powerful Experiences Lie at the Intersection of Design and Strategy On this episode of Experience By Design, Host Bryan Meszaros talked with Matthew McNerney, Creative Director, Experience, Landor & Fitch, an iconic design and strategy agency that delivers extraordinary brand transformation by design. They spoke about his career, career trajectory, and Landor & Fitch.McNerney recently landed at Landor & Fitch, where he directs brand experiences to transform businesses, foster affinity, and build brand ambassadors. His fluid role spans physical environments, programming, service design, and digital interaction, and he often leads business development efforts from ideation through pitch presentations. He promotes collaboration while cultivating space for team members to influence projects from any direction.Landor & Fitch operate together but also separately, according to McNerney. Landor is known for its classic branding, strategic design, and legacy contributions to the graphic design world. Fitch is known for its world-class strategy, experience, retail, and workplace design.“It is really the two ends of the spectrum of branding, so bringing them together to offer our extraordinary work is incredible,” McNerney said.He elaborated that they noticed clients were asking for more coherent deliverables. The two practices of design and strategy from Landor & Fitch integrate the two disciplines to create holistic experiences.“The reality of experience design is that it touches everything,” McNerney said. “Having those two minds is just lovely to really offer incredibly rich solutions for an evolving world that’s only accelerated since the pandemic.”
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What Will Retailtainment Look Like Post-Pandemic? On this episode of Experience By Design, Host Bryan Meszaros talked with David Title, Partner at Bravo Media, a multi-platform creative studio focused on enhanced engagement through dynamic experiences. Meszaros and Title spoke about Title’s career, Bravo’s work, and retail during the pandemic and post-pandemic, including working on Krispy Kreme’s flagship store in Times Square.While working on the project, they came across a lot of fresh donuts that had to be consumed. There’s nothing better than the Original Glaze, according to Title. They were fresh off the line. He just wishes the projects at Mercedes and Lincoln also offered free examples.“We look at shopping as an entertainment, as a thing to do. As much as it is a way to acquire something, which is why a lot of people go shopping and come home with nothing.” - David TitleThe first thing they jumped into was talking shop about work after the pandemic. Title’s team is starting to inquiries pick up, as more projects are picking up and businesses are starting to plan again. Aside from things being closed, there wasn’t much confidence in any sector, Title said. But, as things have gotten a bit more under control, they’re starting to look ahead. They even have a crew headed to Miami to work on a party activation.One of the things he noticed during the pandemic is that people could still get everything they need online. There wasn’t an acquisition of stuff, but now that stores are open, what is the need for consumers to return to the store? Retailers will have to make shopping into something we do for the pleasure of being in the environment, Title said.“We look at shopping as an entertainment, as a thing to do,” Title said. “As much as it is a way to acquire something, which is why a lot of people go shopping and come home with nothing.”
Powerful Experiences Lie at the Intersection of Design and Strategy On this episode of Experience By Design, Host Bryan Meszaros talked with Matthew McNerney, Creative Director, Experience, Landor & Fitch, an iconic design and strategy agency that delivers extraordinary brand transformation by design. They spoke about his career, career trajectory, and Landor & Fitch.McNerney recently landed at Landor & Fitch, where he directs brand experiences to transform businesses, foster affinity, and build brand ambassadors. His fluid role spans physical environments, programming, service design, and digital interaction, and he often leads business development efforts from ideation through pitch presentations. He promotes collaboration while cultivating space for team members to influence projects from any direction.Landor & Fitch operate together but also separately, according to McNerney. Landor is known for its classic branding, strategic design, and legacy contributions to the graphic design world. Fitch is known for its world-class strategy, experience, retail, and workplace design.“It is really the two ends of the spectrum of branding, so bringing them together to offer our extraordinary work is incredible,” McNerney said.He elaborated that they noticed clients were asking for more coherent deliverables. The two practices of design and strategy from Landor & Fitch integrate the two disciplines to create holistic experiences.“The reality of experience design is that it touches everything,” McNerney said. “Having those two minds is just lovely to really offer incredibly rich solutions for an evolving world that’s only accelerated since the pandemic.”
Looking Back and Forward on Experience Design Conversations Catch up with Experience by Design host Bryan Meszaros. He offered thoughts on past conversations, upcoming conversations, and how experience design is quickly evolving. “Starting this podcast was a way to share the conversations I’d been having. There are so many insights that are important to capture.”Meszaros shared his excitement to experience new things as the world begins to open up, creating a bucket list. He also wants to further the conversation on how digital engagement and technology are shaping experiences of the future. One thing he was adamant about is that “you have to create a reason for people to come to you.”Those emerging from the pandemic aren’t the same as before. Meszaros shared some things that resonated with him from an article. “Consumers want connectivity and community. The challenge for experience designers is how to create reconnection.”That’s true of retail, hospitality, and so many other spaces. In retail, getting shoppers in stores is less about the product and more about experiencing some element of that brand.“Buying behaviors have shifted, and consumers are demanding more immersive experience, and they should. This is the moment to apply data and technology to address these shifts. They want something they can’t get at home.”It’s time for more creativity and seamlessly integrating technology and digital media to create unique and enticing environments.Join host Bryan Meszaros on Experience by Design every other Wednesday as he explores the latest trends and solutions, helping craft the world’s most intriguing experiences.
Are AI and Algorithms Ushering in a New Age of Art? Life offers up a lot of experience. As technology advances, a lot of our unique experiences come in the digital space. This is no different for Dutch artist Jeroen Van Der Most, whose work incorporates data, algorithms, and artificial intelligence.On this episode of Experience By Design, Host Bryan Meszaros talks with Van Der Most about his art and how it crosses the divide between the digital world and the illusory boundary of our own. While a significant amount of his work is autonomous, he does commission work for organizations such as Amnesty International.Meszaros and Van Der Most talked about the use of AI in Van Der Most's work. He still explores textbooks and digs into what is out there in the digital world. He worked in data science, so being in the world of algorithms came naturally.&quot;I studied how people were having conversations online,&quot; Van Der Most said. He would study the conversations online for brands. This work proved monotonous, so he started digging into creative outlets. He created basic Twitter images from the Tweets he used in his research. Doing this, he made portraits from the messages.cAround 2013-14, new AI systems and learning appeared and took things to a new level. This allowed artists to engage on a deeper basis with new sounds and imagery. It also started raising some questions for Van Der Most.&quot;Along the way, I got more interested in the philosophical underlying of what AI is,&quot; Van Der said. &quot;It raises all sorts of philosophical questions.&quot;An example would be Van Gogh or Rembrandt. AI was used to study all of their work, and then it created new paintings. This raises all sorts of questions about what is creative, what does that mean for artists and humans.Meszaros explores these subjects and more with Van Der Most.Join host Bryan Meszaros on Experience by Design every other Wednesday as he explores the latest trends and solutions, helping craft the world's most intriguing experiences.
Virtual Experiences Should Not Be Recreations of Physical Ones The evolution of experience design is here. It certainly wasn’t a static element for brands, but the pandemic certainly disrupted it like never before. Talking about this evolution, or possible revolution, Experience by Design host Bryan Meszaros welcomed Christophe Castagnera, Head of Connected Experiences at Imagination. Imagination is an experience agency that offers consulting, design, and creative services for brands worldwide. Castagnera serves as a chief strategist and has over two decades of experience telling brand stories. “The last year has challenged the way we create experiences. It was a lot of reimagining. There were opportunities to seize the moment, so I wrote a Playbook discussing technology, curated experiences, and building at-home experiences,” Castagnera explained. In the last year, the industry had many lessons learned moments. “Investing in technology was a possibility, but not everyone had the funds. People were still touching their mobile phones, so that became an avenue,” he shared.  Trying to recreate an in-person experience online didn’t really work. Those companies that succeeded found new ways to do virtual rather than mimicking physical experiences. The test and try model was good for many brands. “Some were being bold, they learned things, and are being rewarded. Where others lost share of voice that were passive.”Castagnera offered several examples of brands' creative moments. “Rabbit Hole bourbon had staff become virtual hosts for consumers in their home, and they suddenly were having these conversations. Around 70% of people are up for a brand experience in their home.”Castagnera also talked about VR opportunities discovered. “If you can build a proper brand world around it, it works. Otherwise, it’s just bad ‘reality.’ The ecosystem has to be rich.”
Planning For Adaptability in Design Design is much more than static. In the 21st-century is all about experience and shaping environments. To discuss the evolution, Experience by Design host Bryan Meszaros spoke with John Lutz, Partner at Selbert Perkins Design.Lutz always loved art and turned that into a career while studying at the University of Cincinnati. The program was unique, allowing him to alternate between internships and school. These internships allowed him to experience different types of firms. In one internship, he worked on the FedEx rebranding and was part of the team behind the iconic arrow logo. Those experiences helped him decide he wanted to work for Selbert Perkins because they focused on experiential branded environments. “The idea of shaping an entire environment was very appealing to me,” he said.Since then, he’s worked on projects for some of the most well-known places, including the Dallas Cowboys stadium, McCarren airport in Las Vegas, and the St. Louis Cardinals ballpark.Lutz was witness to the transformation of static design to digital being a part of it. “When digital came into the fold, it was like we can put a screen here,” he noted.There was an opportunity for dynamic changing content, but not much else until the evolution of screens, ideas, and configurations. “Over time, we could integrate digital into the art. The digital actually became art,” Lutz added.Much of the firm’s initial work was in wayfinding and gateways. Now, he’s involved in the two worlds merging, bringing imagination, a sculptural approach, and visual drama. Lutz also spoke about environments being timeless but components being changeable. “You have to plan for adaptability in your design. Technology changes, and so do the expectations of those in the spaces.”Join host Bryan Meszaros on Experience by Design every other Wednesday as he explores the latest trends and solutions helping craft the world’s most intriguing experiences.
Keeping Emotional Responses at the Center of the Design Experience by Design host Bryan Meszaros welcomed Jonathan Alger to the show to discuss these topics and a recent project. Alger is the Managing Partner and Co-Founder oof C&amp;G Partners. He has an impressive career working with some of the most prominent brands in the world. Meszaros and Alger spoke about a recent installation for Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “They were looking for a positive distraction art form, an environmental feature that creates positive feelings and distracts from negativity and worrisome thoughts,” Alger said. Alger and team worked on two different designs. One was for the main lobby and the other on the sixth floor. “The first floor is a naturalistic, ever-lasting animation of bonsai, butterflies, koi fish, and blooming plants,” Alger described. What makes this so unique is the use of fiber optics and wood. It creates a meditative and calming environment, as nature tends to do. See its beauty here. The sixth floor includes a virtual koi pond in collaboration with Potion. The environment evolves with color and light, changing season for an immersive experience. In discussing these emotive works, Meszaros and Alger explored what it means to have an immersive experience with art and the path to appealing to emotions. “I hear from clients they want to appeal to emotions, and I ask, ‘Which one?’”Alger referenced the movie Inside Out as a good way to broach the topic since it gives life to the five critical human emotions. The experiences that come from design can be impacting and completely change the experiencer, which was certainly the goal for those facing a health crisis.
Elevating In-Store AV Design to Resonate with Customers Host Bryan Meszaros explores the story behind the exhibit to understand how a carefully crafted experience traps into the human experience to connect people to place.Retailers have been creating experiences for shoppers for hundreds of years. Those have evolved based on customer needs, technology, and now a pandemic. Experience by Design is peering into the question of retail design adaptation. Host Bryan Meszaros welcomed industry veteran Cindi Cato, VP of Global Retail for CallisonRTKL. Cato has spent over 30 years with the architecture, planning, and design firm, creating successful retail experiences.Thinking about where retail is right now, Cato said, “They are stepping back and analyzing the business and how it’s changed during the pandemic. Brands are looking more at omnichannel and how all facets can work together.”Retailers are reconsidering in-store experiences and their message and how it resonates in the world today. Companies are trying new prototypes that allow for adaptions on the interior and exterior, which includes technology. “The technology needs to be purposeful,” Cato added.Another theme Cato touched on was fulfillment at the store level to meet eCommerce demands. “Retailers are looking at low performing stores or spaces in stores they can adapt to support fulfillment,” she noted.Fulfillment also means adjusting stores for curbside, pickup, and queues. Cato explained, “Retailers are planning different entryways, one as a pickup and the other to engage. Lines at stores are also an opportunity for engaging at the storefront.”Engagement and experience are challenging in a touchless world, but Cato discussed that the real connection is in the customer’s hand. “A brand’s app is a big focus right now. That experience should be seamless for customers in the store,” she said.
Focusing on Narrative in Designing a 'Disney Experience' Welcome to another episode of the Experience by Design podcast with host Brian Meszaros. Today, you'll hear from Lee Kitchen, entrepreneur, former Disney innovation catalyst and owner of Magical Dude Consulting.During his 32 years at the Walt Disney Company, he helped create some of their most impactful marketing campaigns, memorable guest experiences and real-time operational efficiency.Below, you'll find an excerpt of Meszaros and Kitchen's conversation. To hear all of their insights, listen to the full episode.LK: If you think about design thinking and creative problem solving, that dates back to the 60s and Alex Osborn and Sid Parnes. It's basically, 'We're not going to look at our challenge straightforward. We're going to take this little lateral journey to get to where we're going. And one of the things I do is I show up, I bring stimulus into the room — so I'll go and collect a lot of different examples of how other businesses are doing things, not necessarily even in the business that I might be working with, but other different kinds of businesses and how they have have solved this kind of challenge before. ... Just come and be inspired and whatever, you know, it might be the catalyst that you need to think about something a little bit differently. And it's so far has been really successful.BM: There's a lot of what we think will happen. There is a lot of observation and how we think human behavior is changed, but it's still a bit of an unknown. I love the fact that it sets up a lot of brands' environments to experiment and try different things.LK: Absolutely. And I make sure that I sit up front, because a lot of times, what happens is people look for solutions that fit what they're doing. So they're programmed to just see what they can extract from it. So I tell them, stop looking for a solution and just start looking. ... Don't just listen for what you want to hear. Listen for everything.
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