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In a Manner of Speaking

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Welcome to Paul Meier's free, monthly "In a Manner of Speaking" podcasts, which he began in February 2018. Each podcast tackles a topic related to the spoken word, including idiolects, news reading, pragmatics, code-switching, Original Pronunciation, phonetics, dialect clichés and stereotypes, and dialects of indigenous peoples.

Paul also invites guests, such as renowned linguist David Crystal, indigenous-speech expert Eric Armstrong, Audie Award-winning audiobook narrators Tavia Gilbert and J… Continue Reading >>
Welcome to Paul Meier's free, monthly "In a Manner of Speaking" podcasts, which he began in February 2018. Each podcast tackles a topic related to the spoken word, including idiolects, news reading, pragmatics, code-switching, Original Pronunciation, phonetics, dialect clichés and stereotypes, and dialects of indigenous peoples.

Paul also invites guests, such as renowned linguist David Crystal, indigenous-speech expert Eric Armstrong, Audie Award-winning audiobook narrators Tavia Gilbert and Julia Whelan, renowned dialect coaches and designers Jim Johnson and Amy Stoller, actress Laraine Newman, and Australian bestseller writer Mem Fox.

(Bach's Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.) << Show Less
Featured Audio
Episode 50 (The Power of Voice) Denise Woods
Paul’s guest for March 2022 is Denise Woods, successful Hollywood dialect coach, theatre professor at the California Institute of the Arts, and author of the recent book The Power of Voice, published by HarperCollins.
In addition to the two dialect coaches discussing the finer points of their profession, Paul and Denise talk about the contentious terms &#8220;accent reduction/modification&#8221; and how to help clients who believe their accent is holding them back socially or professionally. They also discuss coaching Black actors and delve into the changing landscape of audiobooks and how a single narrator can respectfully voice scores of characters who differ in age, gender, dialect, nationality, and ethnicity.
A native of New York City&#8217;s Lower East Side and a graduate and former faculty member of the Juilliard School, Denise has coached Queen Latifah, Will Smith, Halle Berry, Jessica Chastain, Amber Heard, Anthony Mackie, Phylicia Rashad, Ellen Burstyn, Jeanne Tripplehorn, Soledad O’Brien, Morris Chestnut, Taye Diggs, Paul Rodriguez, David Alan Grier, Victoria Rowell, Kellan Lutz, Ray Liotta, Portia De Rossi, Rachel Weisz, Mekhi Phifer, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jeffrey Wright, Mike Myers, and many others. She was recently the dialect coach for the Netflix film The Harder They Fall, starring Idris Elba and Regina King, and she coached Don Cheadle in the critically acclaimed Showtime series, Black Monday.
For more information about Denise, visit her website, SpeakItClearly.com.
(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)The post Episode 50 (The Power of Voice) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
Newest Audio
Episode 50 (The Power of Voice) Denise Woods
Paul’s guest for March 2022 is Denise Woods, successful Hollywood dialect coach, theatre professor at the California Institute of the Arts, and author of the recent book The Power of Voice, published by HarperCollins.
In addition to the two dialect coaches discussing the finer points of their profession, Paul and Denise talk about the contentious terms &#8220;accent reduction/modification&#8221; and how to help clients who believe their accent is holding them back socially or professionally. They also discuss coaching Black actors and delve into the changing landscape of audiobooks and how a single narrator can respectfully voice scores of characters who differ in age, gender, dialect, nationality, and ethnicity.
A native of New York City&#8217;s Lower East Side and a graduate and former faculty member of the Juilliard School, Denise has coached Queen Latifah, Will Smith, Halle Berry, Jessica Chastain, Amber Heard, Anthony Mackie, Phylicia Rashad, Ellen Burstyn, Jeanne Tripplehorn, Soledad O’Brien, Morris Chestnut, Taye Diggs, Paul Rodriguez, David Alan Grier, Victoria Rowell, Kellan Lutz, Ray Liotta, Portia De Rossi, Rachel Weisz, Mekhi Phifer, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Jeffrey Wright, Mike Myers, and many others. She was recently the dialect coach for the Netflix film The Harder They Fall, starring Idris Elba and Regina King, and she coached Don Cheadle in the critically acclaimed Showtime series, Black Monday.
For more information about Denise, visit her website, SpeakItClearly.com.
(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)The post Episode 50 (The Power of Voice) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
Episode 49 (You Are What You Speak) Lane Greene
Paul&#8217;s guest for February 2022 is Lane Greene, language columnist and Spain correspondent for The Economist. This month&#8217;s episode takes its title from one of Lane&#8217;s books, You Are What You Speak (2011), and Paul and Lane tackle a variety of topics related to linguistics, accents, and the myths, fears, hopes, history, and politics surrounding language.
Before Lane moved into his current role at The Economist, he covered digital news, books and culture, European business, law, energy, the environment, and American politics for the publication. He is based in Madrid, after living in London, Berlin, and New York City.
In addition to the aforementioned book, Greene is the author of Talk on the Wild Side (2018) and the winner of the journalism award from the Linguistic Society of America in 2017. He is a former adjunct assistant professor in Global Affairs at New York University and a consultant to Freedom House, a non-governmental organization. He received an M.Phil. from Oxford in European politics and a B.A. with honors from Tulane in international relations and history. Lane, who speaks nine languages, was born in Johnson City, Tennessee, and grew up in Marietta, Georgia.
For more information on Lane, visit LaneGreene.com.The post Episode 49 (You Are What You Speak) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
Episode 48 (Pitch) Gillyanne Kayes
Jeremy Fisher
Paul&#8217;s first guests of 2022 are Gillyanne Kayes and Jeremy Fisher of “Vocal Process,” internationally renowned voice experts specializing in vocal technique and performance in many different genres. A husband-and-wife team, they combine a deep understanding of the voice that comes from science knowledge, performance practice, and decades of experience. The three discuss pitch, specifically the extremes of the human voice as it relates to both speaking and singing.
Jeremy and Gillyanne were first feaured on the podcast in July 2019.
Gillyanne is a voice researcher, pedagogue, and coach, working with numerous artists in theatre, cabaret, and in the recording studio, while Jeremy is a national prizewinning pianist, performance coach and vocal educator. For their full bios, visit https://vocalprocess.co.uk/gillyanne-kayes-jeremy-fisher/.
Gillyanne and Jeremy’s recent work includes the new Online Learning Lounge: more than 600 videos and vocal training resources for voice professionals. They are the authors of 10 books (five of them Amazon #1 bestsellers), including This Is A Voice (Wellcome Trust), Why Do I Need A Vocal Coach (Canu Publishing), and Singing and the Actor (Routledge). Their One Minute Voice Warmup app (Android #1 and Apple #3) was featured in the UK’s leading computer magazine. Their podcast, This Is A Voice, is in the top 5 percent of podcasts worldwide, and they have an updated singing teacher Accreditation program and a new merchandise brand for 2022 (Voicenerdz®).
The fair-use audio snippets you hear in this month&#8217;s podcast were excerpted from the following YouTube clips:

Eight Songs for a Mad King, by Peter Maxwell Davies.
Casta Diva by Bellini, sung by Jeremy Fisher.
Osmin’s Aria from Mozart’s Abduction.
Billy Connolly in performance.
The Doll Aria from Tales of Hoffmann.
Peter Ablinger’s computer-driven player piano rendering the voice of Miro Markus.
A Mariah Carey medley.
Roy Hart’s demonstration of the human voice scaling 6.5 octaves, and
Tim Storms in De Profundis by Paul Mealor with the St Petersburg Chamber Choir.


(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)
The post Episode 48 (Pitch) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
Episode 47 (Teaching Dialects and Grammar) Willem Hollmann
Paul&#8217;s final guest for 2021 is Willem Hollmann, who has been generating headlines recently with his thoughts on how we teach grammar and dialects. A professor of linguistics and associate dean in the Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences at Lancaster University in England, Hollman encourages a more robust discussion of regional English dialects and grammar in English education. But his views have also been distorted by the media, so in this month&#8217;s podcast, Paul and Willem set the record straight.
All dialects are equal, but are some more equal than others? Find out by listening to the December podcast.
To learn more about Paul&#8217;s guest, go here, or read the following biography, supplied to us by Professor Hollmann:
Willem was born in the Netherlands, where he grew up and went to school. He did an MA in English linguistics and literature at the University of Amsterdam, after which he got funding for an MA in English language and lnguistics at the University of Manchester, a university he picked because of the fantastic combination (at the time) of expertise in historical linguistics (especially Prof. David Denison and Prof. Richard Hogg) and cognitive linguistics (particularly Prof. Bill Croft). He managed to get AHRC funding to stay on at Manchester and do a Ph.D (on causative constructions), which was supervised by Prof. Bill Croft and Prof. David Denison.
During the last year of his Ph.D, Willem applied for and was offered a lectureship at Lancaster University, where he has been since. He does research on cognitive linguistics, including the relatively new, highly interdisciplinary sub-discipline of cognitive sociolinguistics, which he has helped pioneer. He’s interested in linguistic theory, informed by synchronic and diachronic (historical) data, and often uses corpora to get those data. In the context of his interest in cognitive sociolinguistics, he looks at linguistic variation, including dialect variation, and has published several papers on Lancashire dialect, studied through the lens of cognitive, usage-based linguistics.
Willem also has a strong interest in educational linguistics and has done consultancy work for the Department for Education (including on the literacy skills tests for newly qualified teachers in England) and for the exam board OCR (their revised, 2015 A-level English Language). He is a long-standing member (and former secretary and chairman) of the Committee for Linguistics in Education (https://clie.org.uk) and also chairs the Education Committee of the Linguistics Association of Great Britain (http://www.lagb.org.uk/).
Willem’s broad interests have seen him develop and teach many different modules, including cognitive linguistics and construction grammar, general linguistics, English grammar, language change, the history of English, forensic linguistics, and research methods.
Willem is married, and he and his wife have two boys, ages five and seven. The boys are being raised trilingually, and their linguistic and cognitive development often features in his lectures &#8212; and occasionally also on Twitter, which Willem has recently discovered, following discussion there about the way in which his two articles on The Conversation, published in September and October this year, had been (mis)represented in mainstream media.

(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)
The post Episode 47 (Teaching Dialects and Grammar) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
Episode 46 (Highly Irregular) Arika Okrent
For the November 2021 episode of the podcast, Paul discusses the peculiarities of the English language with Arika Okrent, author of Highly Irregular: Why Tough, Through, and Dough Don’t Rhyme.
Arika is also a linguist and author of In the Land of Invented Languages. She worked in a brain-research lab on her way to a Ph.D in psycholinguistics from the University of Chicago and now writes about language for publications including Mental Floss, The Week, Smithsonian Magazine, Popular Science, Slate, and Aeon. For more information on Arika, visit http://arikaokrent.com.
(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)The post Episode 46 (Highly Irregular) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
Episode 45 (Read Me a Story) Elizabeth Wiley
Paul&#8217;s October podcast focuses on the art of audiobook narration. His guest is professional audiobook narrator Elizabeth Wiley, who has earned multiple Audie nominations, Voice Arts nominations, and AudioFile Magazine Earphones Awards. She is also a Voice Arts Award winner for narration.
Elizabeth works across a wide range of literary genres, with publishers and authors often seeking her out for her agility with dialects, rich character work, and facility with complex language.
She is a professor emerita of the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, where she taught acting, voice and speech, dialects, physical theatre and Shakespeare performance. She has also coached and directed many theatre productions in academia and professionally.
For further information, see www.WileyVoice.com.
Paul reads from Charles Dickens&#8217; A Christmas Carol while Elizabeth reads from Andromeda Romano-Lax&#8217;s Annie and the Wolves, copyright 2021 Highbridge, a division of Recorded Books. To purchase that entire audiobook, visit Audible.com.
(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)The post Episode 45 (Read Me a Story) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
Episode 44 (Let's Talk) David Crystal
Paul&#8217;s guest this month is the respected linguist David Crystal, who is making his third appearance on the podcast. Inspired by Let&#8217;s Talk, one of David&#8217;s latest books, Paul and David converse about &#8230; conversation itself.
To learn about David, visit his website and Wikipedia, or listen to David&#8217;s two prior appearances on this podcast: June 2018 and November 2019.
(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)The post Episode 44 (Let’s Talk) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
Episode 43 (Heightened Language and Black Playwrights) Jacqueline Springfield
For the August 2021 podcast, Paul talks about heightened language and Black playwrights with his guest, Professor Jacqueline Springfield of Kennesaw State University in Atlanta, Georgia. Often defined as a more formal, emotional, or poetic way of speaking, &#8220;heightened language&#8221; frequently features words that are chosen for their sound and power, not just their meaning. Among the many playwrights Paul and Jacqueline discuss are Lorraine Hansberry and August Wilson.
Professor Springfield is a professional actor, director, and instructor of acting, voice, speech, and dialects. She has been based in New York for the last nine years and has just relocated to the Metro Atlanta area. Her teaching credits include: The Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute, The American Musical and Dramatic Academy (NY), The Black Arts Institute at Stella Adler, New York Film Academy, Brooklyn College, Point Park University Conservatory of Performing Arts, Montclair State University, University at Albany, Wildwind Performance Lab at Texas Tech, The Kennedy Center, and The American College Theatre Festival.
Her professional dialect coaching credits include: True Colors Theatre, The Kennedy Center, Ensemble Studio Theatre, American Players Theatre and Pittsburgh Playhouse. She holds a master of fine arts degree in acting from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and is a certified associate instructor of Fitzmaurice Voicework. Jacqueline is a proud member of Actors’ Equity Association and SAG-AFTRA, and she continues to work as a performer in film, television, theatre, and voiceover. For more information, visit her website.
The YouTube clips played in this podcast are used under the copyright doctrine of fair use. The complete copyright information on each clip is listed at the end of the podcast. For the full Raisin in the Sun clips, go here and here. For the Fences clips, click here and here. For the clip from The Mountaintop, go here. And for the clip of Marcus Gardley, go here.
(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)The post Episode 43 (Heightened Language and Black Playwrights) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
Episode 42 (Law Talk) Pamela Keller
For the July 2021 podcast, Paul&#8217;s guest is Professor Pamela Keller of the School of Law at the University of Kansas, where she teaches what she calls &#8220;lawyering skills.&#8221; Appropriately, the topic of conversation is the spoken word as it relates to the law and, specifically, courtroom procedures and presentations.
Professor Keller has been a law clerk and litigation attorney for a large law firm and, for the last 20 years, has been teaching lawyering and advocacy skills. For her complete biography, go here.
(Bach’s Cello Suite #1 in G Major BMV 1007 Prelude (by Ivan Dolgunov) courtesy of Jamendo Licensing.)The post Episode 42 (Law Talk) first appeared on Paul Meier Dialect Services.
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