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The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932, until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach but were unable to sustain it. Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

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The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932, until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach but were unable to sustain it. Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

Listen to Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 Old Time Radio on Vurbl. As you enjoy Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955, keep in mind that you can easily make snippets of your favorite moments to save to your station or share with friends and family. You can even make Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 playlists of your favorite episodes, quotes and moments from this timeless era of radio. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 on the fly. << Show Less
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JB 1955-04-03 Ed comes up from the vault | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM


The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932 until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. The Canada Dry Program was on the air from May 2, 1932 until October 26, 1932. It starred Jack Benny. The announcer was George Hicks with George Olsen and his wife Ethel Shutta providing music and vocals, and Jack's wife, Sadye Marks, as Mary Livingstone. The show moved over to CBS on October 30, 1932 to January 26, 1933. On CBS the music was provided by Ted Weems and his orchestra.

The next sponsor was General Motors and the program was called The Chevrolet Program. It aired on NBC from March 17, 1933 until April 1, 1934. The cast included Jack and Mary with singers James Melton in 1933 and Frank Parker from 1933 to 1934. The announcers were Howard Claney in 1933 and Alois Havrilla from 1933 to 1934. Music was supplied by Frank Black.

The program became The General Tire Show from April 6 to September 28, 1934. Joining Jack and Mary was Frank Parker, and Jack's long-time announcer Don Wilson was added. Music was performed by Don Bestor on the east coast and Jimmy Grier on the west coast.
The Jello Program was on the air from October 14, 1934 to May 31, 1942. The show started on the Blue Network until October 4, 1936, then moved to the Red Network thereafter. The cast included Jack and Mary with Don Wilson. Music was provided by Johnny Green in 1934 and 35 and then Phil Harris started in 1936. The program singers were first Michael Bartlett, then Kenny Baker from November 3, 1935, and finally Dennis Day joined the show on October 8, 1939. Eddie Anderson became a regular on June 20, 1937. The show was produced in Hollywood permanently starting in April of 1935.

Post became the next sponsor and the show was called The Grape Nuts and Grape Nuts Flakes Program. It aired on NBC and ran from October 4, 1942 until June 2, 1944. It starred the regular cast of Jack, Mary, Eddie, Dennis, Phil and Don.

Next came The Lucky Strike Program which aired on NBC from October 1, 1944 to December 26, 1948. The only change to the cast was Larry Stevens who flew in while Dennis Day was in the service.

Then on January 2, 1949, the program moved to CBS and it ran there until May 22, 1955. Bob Crosby replaced Phil Harris on September 14, 1952.
The Best of Benny, which were repeat broadcasts, aired on CBS from October 28, 1956 to June 22, 1958.

Jack's first appearance on the radio occurred while he was interviewed by Ed Sullivan. His first words over the microphone were "This is Jack Benny talking. There will be a slight pause while you say 'Who cares?'" This interview lead to the first radio contract with Canada Dry. This first program was mainly musical with George Olsen performing seven musical numbers and Jack was the master of ceremonies.

According to John Dunning, The Jack Benny Program evolved over time from its vaudeville roots to become the quintessential American radio comedy show. It was a jigsaw puzzle where pieces were added over the years. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach, but were unable to sustain it.

Jack worked with Harry Conn to develop his character as well as the character of Mary Livingstone, which he had played by his wife. Mary Livingstone was a very sarcastic but well meaning friend to Jack. Sometimes she was presented as a date, sometimes as a love interest, but often she was just there. Her role changed from plot to plot and she never really was a steady girlfriend to Jack.

In 1933 Jack began arguing with his cast, adding another characteristic which led to less musical numbers and more comedy. In April of 1934 Don Wilson was added to the program and Don was Jack's announcer all the way up to the end of the TV show in 1965. He was a target of Jack's jokes mostly about his weight even though he was never really overweight. The next piece added was when Phil Harris joined the show in 1936. Phil's character was a skirt chasing, arrogant, hip-talking band leader who constantly put Jack down. He is remembered for referring to Jack as Jackson.

Then came Eddie Anderson who started playing the part of a train porter and then joined the cast as a regular as Rochester in June of 1937, as Benny's personal valet. Early in the show's run he often talked about gambling or going out with women, but later he just generally complained about his lack of salary.

The last piece of the puzzle was supplied by the arrival of Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty. McNulty is better known as Dennis Day. Dennis was always in his early twenties no matter how old he actually was. His character was sweet but not very bright. One of the few memorable aspects of the program was the fifteen year feud with fellow radio actor Fred Allen. In one occasion when ratings were falling "The I Can't Stand Jack Benny Because -" contest was run, which boosted ratings right back up.

Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

This synopsis was adapted from John Dunning's The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio.

These are episodes from the 1954-1955 season.
This page is one of a set of individual OTRR "Jack Benny - Single Episode" pages:
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1932-1934
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1934-1935
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1935-1936
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1936-1937
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1937-1938
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1938-1939
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1939-1940
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1940-1941
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1941-1942
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1942-1943
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1943-1944
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1944-1945
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1945-1946
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1946-1947
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1947-1948
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1948-1949
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1949-1950
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1950-1951
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1951-1952
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1952-1953
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1953-1954
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #1
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #2

The episodes on the pages above and much, much more can be found at The Jack Benny Program.




From the Old Time Radio Researchers Group. See "Notes" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

Listen to thousands of Old Time Radio shows and episodes. Have you heard an amazing nostalgic moment from JB 1955-04-03 Ed comes up from the vault? You can quickly make snippets of your favorite moments from Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 or clip out those classic Old Time Radio commercials for a window into advertising history. Make a playlist of your favorite episodes and highlights and share it with your friends and family. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save JB 1955-04-03 Ed comes up from the vault.
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JB 1955-02-13 No one remembers Jack's birthday | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM


The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932 until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. The Canada Dry Program was on the air from May 2, 1932 until October 26, 1932. It starred Jack Benny. The announcer was George Hicks with George Olsen and his wife Ethel Shutta providing music and vocals, and Jack's wife, Sadye Marks, as Mary Livingstone. The show moved over to CBS on October 30, 1932 to January 26, 1933. On CBS the music was provided by Ted Weems and his orchestra.

The next sponsor was General Motors and the program was called The Chevrolet Program. It aired on NBC from March 17, 1933 until April 1, 1934. The cast included Jack and Mary with singers James Melton in 1933 and Frank Parker from 1933 to 1934. The announcers were Howard Claney in 1933 and Alois Havrilla from 1933 to 1934. Music was supplied by Frank Black.

The program became The General Tire Show from April 6 to September 28, 1934. Joining Jack and Mary was Frank Parker, and Jack's long-time announcer Don Wilson was added. Music was performed by Don Bestor on the east coast and Jimmy Grier on the west coast.
The Jello Program was on the air from October 14, 1934 to May 31, 1942. The show started on the Blue Network until October 4, 1936, then moved to the Red Network thereafter. The cast included Jack and Mary with Don Wilson. Music was provided by Johnny Green in 1934 and 35 and then Phil Harris started in 1936. The program singers were first Michael Bartlett, then Kenny Baker from November 3, 1935, and finally Dennis Day joined the show on October 8, 1939. Eddie Anderson became a regular on June 20, 1937. The show was produced in Hollywood permanently starting in April of 1935.

Post became the next sponsor and the show was called The Grape Nuts and Grape Nuts Flakes Program. It aired on NBC and ran from October 4, 1942 until June 2, 1944. It starred the regular cast of Jack, Mary, Eddie, Dennis, Phil and Don.

Next came The Lucky Strike Program which aired on NBC from October 1, 1944 to December 26, 1948. The only change to the cast was Larry Stevens who flew in while Dennis Day was in the service.

Then on January 2, 1949, the program moved to CBS and it ran there until May 22, 1955. Bob Crosby replaced Phil Harris on September 14, 1952.
The Best of Benny, which were repeat broadcasts, aired on CBS from October 28, 1956 to June 22, 1958.

Jack's first appearance on the radio occurred while he was interviewed by Ed Sullivan. His first words over the microphone were "This is Jack Benny talking. There will be a slight pause while you say 'Who cares?'" This interview lead to the first radio contract with Canada Dry. This first program was mainly musical with George Olsen performing seven musical numbers and Jack was the master of ceremonies.

According to John Dunning, The Jack Benny Program evolved over time from its vaudeville roots to become the quintessential American radio comedy show. It was a jigsaw puzzle where pieces were added over the years. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach, but were unable to sustain it.

Jack worked with Harry Conn to develop his character as well as the character of Mary Livingstone, which he had played by his wife. Mary Livingstone was a very sarcastic but well meaning friend to Jack. Sometimes she was presented as a date, sometimes as a love interest, but often she was just there. Her role changed from plot to plot and she never really was a steady girlfriend to Jack.

In 1933 Jack began arguing with his cast, adding another characteristic which led to less musical numbers and more comedy. In April of 1934 Don Wilson was added to the program and Don was Jack's announcer all the way up to the end of the TV show in 1965. He was a target of Jack's jokes mostly about his weight even though he was never really overweight. The next piece added was when Phil Harris joined the show in 1936. Phil's character was a skirt chasing, arrogant, hip-talking band leader who constantly put Jack down. He is remembered for referring to Jack as Jackson.

Then came Eddie Anderson who started playing the part of a train porter and then joined the cast as a regular as Rochester in June of 1937, as Benny's personal valet. Early in the show's run he often talked about gambling or going out with women, but later he just generally complained about his lack of salary.

The last piece of the puzzle was supplied by the arrival of Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty. McNulty is better known as Dennis Day. Dennis was always in his early twenties no matter how old he actually was. His character was sweet but not very bright. One of the few memorable aspects of the program was the fifteen year feud with fellow radio actor Fred Allen. In one occasion when ratings were falling "The I Can't Stand Jack Benny Because -" contest was run, which boosted ratings right back up.

Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

This synopsis was adapted from John Dunning's The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio.

These are episodes from the 1954-1955 season.
This page is one of a set of individual OTRR "Jack Benny - Single Episode" pages:
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1932-1934
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1934-1935
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1935-1936
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1936-1937
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1937-1938
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1938-1939
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1939-1940
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1940-1941
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1941-1942
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1942-1943
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1943-1944
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1944-1945
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1945-1946
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1946-1947
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1947-1948
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1948-1949
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1949-1950
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1950-1951
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1951-1952
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1952-1953
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1953-1954
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #1
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #2

The episodes on the pages above and much, much more can be found at The Jack Benny Program.




From the Old Time Radio Researchers Group. See "Notes" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

Listen to thousands of Old Time Radio shows and episodes. Have you heard an amazing nostalgic moment from JB 1955-02-13 No one remembers Jack's birthday? You can quickly make snippets of your favorite moments from Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 or clip out those classic Old Time Radio commercials for a window into advertising history. Make a playlist of your favorite episodes and highlights and share it with your friends and family. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save JB 1955-02-13 No one remembers Jack's birthday.
JB 1955-02-06 Jack is insured by the sponsor for $1,000,000 | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM


The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932 until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. The Canada Dry Program was on the air from May 2, 1932 until October 26, 1932. It starred Jack Benny. The announcer was George Hicks with George Olsen and his wife Ethel Shutta providing music and vocals, and Jack's wife, Sadye Marks, as Mary Livingstone. The show moved over to CBS on October 30, 1932 to January 26, 1933. On CBS the music was provided by Ted Weems and his orchestra.

The next sponsor was General Motors and the program was called The Chevrolet Program. It aired on NBC from March 17, 1933 until April 1, 1934. The cast included Jack and Mary with singers James Melton in 1933 and Frank Parker from 1933 to 1934. The announcers were Howard Claney in 1933 and Alois Havrilla from 1933 to 1934. Music was supplied by Frank Black.

The program became The General Tire Show from April 6 to September 28, 1934. Joining Jack and Mary was Frank Parker, and Jack's long-time announcer Don Wilson was added. Music was performed by Don Bestor on the east coast and Jimmy Grier on the west coast.
The Jello Program was on the air from October 14, 1934 to May 31, 1942. The show started on the Blue Network until October 4, 1936, then moved to the Red Network thereafter. The cast included Jack and Mary with Don Wilson. Music was provided by Johnny Green in 1934 and 35 and then Phil Harris started in 1936. The program singers were first Michael Bartlett, then Kenny Baker from November 3, 1935, and finally Dennis Day joined the show on October 8, 1939. Eddie Anderson became a regular on June 20, 1937. The show was produced in Hollywood permanently starting in April of 1935.

Post became the next sponsor and the show was called The Grape Nuts and Grape Nuts Flakes Program. It aired on NBC and ran from October 4, 1942 until June 2, 1944. It starred the regular cast of Jack, Mary, Eddie, Dennis, Phil and Don.

Next came The Lucky Strike Program which aired on NBC from October 1, 1944 to December 26, 1948. The only change to the cast was Larry Stevens who flew in while Dennis Day was in the service.

Then on January 2, 1949, the program moved to CBS and it ran there until May 22, 1955. Bob Crosby replaced Phil Harris on September 14, 1952.
The Best of Benny, which were repeat broadcasts, aired on CBS from October 28, 1956 to June 22, 1958.

Jack's first appearance on the radio occurred while he was interviewed by Ed Sullivan. His first words over the microphone were "This is Jack Benny talking. There will be a slight pause while you say 'Who cares?'" This interview lead to the first radio contract with Canada Dry. This first program was mainly musical with George Olsen performing seven musical numbers and Jack was the master of ceremonies.

According to John Dunning, The Jack Benny Program evolved over time from its vaudeville roots to become the quintessential American radio comedy show. It was a jigsaw puzzle where pieces were added over the years. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach, but were unable to sustain it.

Jack worked with Harry Conn to develop his character as well as the character of Mary Livingstone, which he had played by his wife. Mary Livingstone was a very sarcastic but well meaning friend to Jack. Sometimes she was presented as a date, sometimes as a love interest, but often she was just there. Her role changed from plot to plot and she never really was a steady girlfriend to Jack.

In 1933 Jack began arguing with his cast, adding another characteristic which led to less musical numbers and more comedy. In April of 1934 Don Wilson was added to the program and Don was Jack's announcer all the way up to the end of the TV show in 1965. He was a target of Jack's jokes mostly about his weight even though he was never really overweight. The next piece added was when Phil Harris joined the show in 1936. Phil's character was a skirt chasing, arrogant, hip-talking band leader who constantly put Jack down. He is remembered for referring to Jack as Jackson.

Then came Eddie Anderson who started playing the part of a train porter and then joined the cast as a regular as Rochester in June of 1937, as Benny's personal valet. Early in the show's run he often talked about gambling or going out with women, but later he just generally complained about his lack of salary.

The last piece of the puzzle was supplied by the arrival of Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty. McNulty is better known as Dennis Day. Dennis was always in his early twenties no matter how old he actually was. His character was sweet but not very bright. One of the few memorable aspects of the program was the fifteen year feud with fellow radio actor Fred Allen. In one occasion when ratings were falling "The I Can't Stand Jack Benny Because -" contest was run, which boosted ratings right back up.

Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

This synopsis was adapted from John Dunning's The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio.

These are episodes from the 1954-1955 season.
This page is one of a set of individual OTRR "Jack Benny - Single Episode" pages:
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1932-1934
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1934-1935
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1935-1936
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1936-1937
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1937-1938
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1938-1939
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1939-1940
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1940-1941
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1941-1942
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1942-1943
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1943-1944
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1944-1945
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1945-1946
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1946-1947
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1947-1948
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1948-1949
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1949-1950
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1950-1951
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1951-1952
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1952-1953
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1953-1954
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #1
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #2

The episodes on the pages above and much, much more can be found at The Jack Benny Program.




From the Old Time Radio Researchers Group. See "Notes" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

Listen to thousands of Old Time Radio shows and episodes. Have you heard an amazing nostalgic moment from JB 1955-02-06 Jack is insured by the sponsor for $1,000,000? You can quickly make snippets of your favorite moments from Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 or clip out those classic Old Time Radio commercials for a window into advertising history. Make a playlist of your favorite episodes and highlights and share it with your friends and family. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save JB 1955-02-06 Jack is insured by the sponsor for $1,000,000.
Listen to Jack Benny: Elephants' Graveyard | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio Listen to Jack Benny: Elephants' Graveyard. Jack goes for a walk in Beverly Hills when he recognizes a farmer and they reminisce on old memories. Jack's mind is wandering in many different places but reading about the Elephants Graveyard helps distract him. He finds himself transported through the uncharted jungles of Africa to go on an adventure with a beautiful woman.

Listen to thousands of Old Time Radio shows and episodes. Have you heard an amazing nostalgic moment from Listen to Jack Benny: Elephants' Graveyard? You can quickly make snippets of your favorite moments from Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 or clip out those classic Old Time Radio commercials for a window into advertising history. Make a playlist of your favorite episodes and highlights and share it with your friends and family. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save Listen to Jack Benny: Elephants' Graveyard.
JB 1955-05-22 Last radio broadcast - Twombly, the sound effects man, has difficulty | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM


The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932 until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. The Canada Dry Program was on the air from May 2, 1932 until October 26, 1932. It starred Jack Benny. The announcer was George Hicks with George Olsen and his wife Ethel Shutta providing music and vocals, and Jack's wife, Sadye Marks, as Mary Livingstone. The show moved over to CBS on October 30, 1932 to January 26, 1933. On CBS the music was provided by Ted Weems and his orchestra.

The next sponsor was General Motors and the program was called The Chevrolet Program. It aired on NBC from March 17, 1933 until April 1, 1934. The cast included Jack and Mary with singers James Melton in 1933 and Frank Parker from 1933 to 1934. The announcers were Howard Claney in 1933 and Alois Havrilla from 1933 to 1934. Music was supplied by Frank Black.

The program became The General Tire Show from April 6 to September 28, 1934. Joining Jack and Mary was Frank Parker, and Jack's long-time announcer Don Wilson was added. Music was performed by Don Bestor on the east coast and Jimmy Grier on the west coast.
The Jello Program was on the air from October 14, 1934 to May 31, 1942. The show started on the Blue Network until October 4, 1936, then moved to the Red Network thereafter. The cast included Jack and Mary with Don Wilson. Music was provided by Johnny Green in 1934 and 35 and then Phil Harris started in 1936. The program singers were first Michael Bartlett, then Kenny Baker from November 3, 1935, and finally Dennis Day joined the show on October 8, 1939. Eddie Anderson became a regular on June 20, 1937. The show was produced in Hollywood permanently starting in April of 1935.

Post became the next sponsor and the show was called The Grape Nuts and Grape Nuts Flakes Program. It aired on NBC and ran from October 4, 1942 until June 2, 1944. It starred the regular cast of Jack, Mary, Eddie, Dennis, Phil and Don.

Next came The Lucky Strike Program which aired on NBC from October 1, 1944 to December 26, 1948. The only change to the cast was Larry Stevens who flew in while Dennis Day was in the service.

Then on January 2, 1949, the program moved to CBS and it ran there until May 22, 1955. Bob Crosby replaced Phil Harris on September 14, 1952.
The Best of Benny, which were repeat broadcasts, aired on CBS from October 28, 1956 to June 22, 1958.

Jack's first appearance on the radio occurred while he was interviewed by Ed Sullivan. His first words over the microphone were "This is Jack Benny talking. There will be a slight pause while you say 'Who cares?'" This interview lead to the first radio contract with Canada Dry. This first program was mainly musical with George Olsen performing seven musical numbers and Jack was the master of ceremonies.

According to John Dunning, The Jack Benny Program evolved over time from its vaudeville roots to become the quintessential American radio comedy show. It was a jigsaw puzzle where pieces were added over the years. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach, but were unable to sustain it.

Jack worked with Harry Conn to develop his character as well as the character of Mary Livingstone, which he had played by his wife. Mary Livingstone was a very sarcastic but well meaning friend to Jack. Sometimes she was presented as a date, sometimes as a love interest, but often she was just there. Her role changed from plot to plot and she never really was a steady girlfriend to Jack.

In 1933 Jack began arguing with his cast, adding another characteristic which led to less musical numbers and more comedy. In April of 1934 Don Wilson was added to the program and Don was Jack's announcer all the way up to the end of the TV show in 1965. He was a target of Jack's jokes mostly about his weight even though he was never really overweight. The next piece added was when Phil Harris joined the show in 1936. Phil's character was a skirt chasing, arrogant, hip-talking band leader who constantly put Jack down. He is remembered for referring to Jack as Jackson.

Then came Eddie Anderson who started playing the part of a train porter and then joined the cast as a regular as Rochester in June of 1937, as Benny's personal valet. Early in the show's run he often talked about gambling or going out with women, but later he just generally complained about his lack of salary.

The last piece of the puzzle was supplied by the arrival of Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty. McNulty is better known as Dennis Day. Dennis was always in his early twenties no matter how old he actually was. His character was sweet but not very bright. One of the few memorable aspects of the program was the fifteen year feud with fellow radio actor Fred Allen. In one occasion when ratings were falling "The I Can't Stand Jack Benny Because -" contest was run, which boosted ratings right back up.

Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

This synopsis was adapted from John Dunning's The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio.

These are episodes from the 1954-1955 season.
This page is one of a set of individual OTRR "Jack Benny - Single Episode" pages:
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1932-1934
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1934-1935
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1935-1936
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1936-1937
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1937-1938
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1938-1939
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1939-1940
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1940-1941
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1941-1942
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1942-1943
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1943-1944
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1944-1945
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1945-1946
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1946-1947
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1947-1948
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1948-1949
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1949-1950
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1950-1951
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1951-1952
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1952-1953
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1953-1954
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #1
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #2

The episodes on the pages above and much, much more can be found at The Jack Benny Program.




From the Old Time Radio Researchers Group. See "Notes" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

Listen to thousands of Old Time Radio shows and episodes. Have you heard an amazing nostalgic moment from JB 1955-05-22 Last radio broadcast - Twombly, the sound effects man, has difficulty? You can quickly make snippets of your favorite moments from Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 or clip out those classic Old Time Radio commercials for a window into advertising history. Make a playlist of your favorite episodes and highlights and share it with your friends and family. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save JB 1955-05-22 Last radio broadcast - Twombly, the sound effects man, has difficulty.
JB 1955-01-16 No script | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM


The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932 until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. The Canada Dry Program was on the air from May 2, 1932 until October 26, 1932. It starred Jack Benny. The announcer was George Hicks with George Olsen and his wife Ethel Shutta providing music and vocals, and Jack's wife, Sadye Marks, as Mary Livingstone. The show moved over to CBS on October 30, 1932 to January 26, 1933. On CBS the music was provided by Ted Weems and his orchestra.

The next sponsor was General Motors and the program was called The Chevrolet Program. It aired on NBC from March 17, 1933 until April 1, 1934. The cast included Jack and Mary with singers James Melton in 1933 and Frank Parker from 1933 to 1934. The announcers were Howard Claney in 1933 and Alois Havrilla from 1933 to 1934. Music was supplied by Frank Black.

The program became The General Tire Show from April 6 to September 28, 1934. Joining Jack and Mary was Frank Parker, and Jack's long-time announcer Don Wilson was added. Music was performed by Don Bestor on the east coast and Jimmy Grier on the west coast.
The Jello Program was on the air from October 14, 1934 to May 31, 1942. The show started on the Blue Network until October 4, 1936, then moved to the Red Network thereafter. The cast included Jack and Mary with Don Wilson. Music was provided by Johnny Green in 1934 and 35 and then Phil Harris started in 1936. The program singers were first Michael Bartlett, then Kenny Baker from November 3, 1935, and finally Dennis Day joined the show on October 8, 1939. Eddie Anderson became a regular on June 20, 1937. The show was produced in Hollywood permanently starting in April of 1935.

Post became the next sponsor and the show was called The Grape Nuts and Grape Nuts Flakes Program. It aired on NBC and ran from October 4, 1942 until June 2, 1944. It starred the regular cast of Jack, Mary, Eddie, Dennis, Phil and Don.

Next came The Lucky Strike Program which aired on NBC from October 1, 1944 to December 26, 1948. The only change to the cast was Larry Stevens who flew in while Dennis Day was in the service.

Then on January 2, 1949, the program moved to CBS and it ran there until May 22, 1955. Bob Crosby replaced Phil Harris on September 14, 1952.
The Best of Benny, which were repeat broadcasts, aired on CBS from October 28, 1956 to June 22, 1958.

Jack's first appearance on the radio occurred while he was interviewed by Ed Sullivan. His first words over the microphone were "This is Jack Benny talking. There will be a slight pause while you say 'Who cares?'" This interview lead to the first radio contract with Canada Dry. This first program was mainly musical with George Olsen performing seven musical numbers and Jack was the master of ceremonies.

According to John Dunning, The Jack Benny Program evolved over time from its vaudeville roots to become the quintessential American radio comedy show. It was a jigsaw puzzle where pieces were added over the years. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach, but were unable to sustain it.

Jack worked with Harry Conn to develop his character as well as the character of Mary Livingstone, which he had played by his wife. Mary Livingstone was a very sarcastic but well meaning friend to Jack. Sometimes she was presented as a date, sometimes as a love interest, but often she was just there. Her role changed from plot to plot and she never really was a steady girlfriend to Jack.

In 1933 Jack began arguing with his cast, adding another characteristic which led to less musical numbers and more comedy. In April of 1934 Don Wilson was added to the program and Don was Jack's announcer all the way up to the end of the TV show in 1965. He was a target of Jack's jokes mostly about his weight even though he was never really overweight. The next piece added was when Phil Harris joined the show in 1936. Phil's character was a skirt chasing, arrogant, hip-talking band leader who constantly put Jack down. He is remembered for referring to Jack as Jackson.

Then came Eddie Anderson who started playing the part of a train porter and then joined the cast as a regular as Rochester in June of 1937, as Benny's personal valet. Early in the show's run he often talked about gambling or going out with women, but later he just generally complained about his lack of salary.

The last piece of the puzzle was supplied by the arrival of Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty. McNulty is better known as Dennis Day. Dennis was always in his early twenties no matter how old he actually was. His character was sweet but not very bright. One of the few memorable aspects of the program was the fifteen year feud with fellow radio actor Fred Allen. In one occasion when ratings were falling "The I Can't Stand Jack Benny Because -" contest was run, which boosted ratings right back up.

Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

This synopsis was adapted from John Dunning's The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio.

These are episodes from the 1954-1955 season.
This page is one of a set of individual OTRR "Jack Benny - Single Episode" pages:
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1932-1934
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1934-1935
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1935-1936
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1936-1937
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1937-1938
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1938-1939
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1939-1940
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1940-1941
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1941-1942
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1942-1943
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1943-1944
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1944-1945
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1945-1946
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1946-1947
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1947-1948
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1948-1949
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1949-1950
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1950-1951
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1951-1952
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1952-1953
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1953-1954
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #1
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #2

The episodes on the pages above and much, much more can be found at The Jack Benny Program.




From the Old Time Radio Researchers Group. See "Notes" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

Listen to thousands of Old Time Radio shows and episodes. Have you heard an amazing nostalgic moment from JB 1955-01-16 No script? You can quickly make snippets of your favorite moments from Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 or clip out those classic Old Time Radio commercials for a window into advertising history. Make a playlist of your favorite episodes and highlights and share it with your friends and family. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save JB 1955-01-16 No script.
JB 1954-11-28 Jack takes Dennis to the psychiatrist | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM


The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932 until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. The Canada Dry Program was on the air from May 2, 1932 until October 26, 1932. It starred Jack Benny. The announcer was George Hicks with George Olsen and his wife Ethel Shutta providing music and vocals, and Jack's wife, Sadye Marks, as Mary Livingstone. The show moved over to CBS on October 30, 1932 to January 26, 1933. On CBS the music was provided by Ted Weems and his orchestra.

The next sponsor was General Motors and the program was called The Chevrolet Program. It aired on NBC from March 17, 1933 until April 1, 1934. The cast included Jack and Mary with singers James Melton in 1933 and Frank Parker from 1933 to 1934. The announcers were Howard Claney in 1933 and Alois Havrilla from 1933 to 1934. Music was supplied by Frank Black.

The program became The General Tire Show from April 6 to September 28, 1934. Joining Jack and Mary was Frank Parker, and Jack's long-time announcer Don Wilson was added. Music was performed by Don Bestor on the east coast and Jimmy Grier on the west coast.
The Jello Program was on the air from October 14, 1934 to May 31, 1942. The show started on the Blue Network until October 4, 1936, then moved to the Red Network thereafter. The cast included Jack and Mary with Don Wilson. Music was provided by Johnny Green in 1934 and 35 and then Phil Harris started in 1936. The program singers were first Michael Bartlett, then Kenny Baker from November 3, 1935, and finally Dennis Day joined the show on October 8, 1939. Eddie Anderson became a regular on June 20, 1937. The show was produced in Hollywood permanently starting in April of 1935.

Post became the next sponsor and the show was called The Grape Nuts and Grape Nuts Flakes Program. It aired on NBC and ran from October 4, 1942 until June 2, 1944. It starred the regular cast of Jack, Mary, Eddie, Dennis, Phil and Don.

Next came The Lucky Strike Program which aired on NBC from October 1, 1944 to December 26, 1948. The only change to the cast was Larry Stevens who flew in while Dennis Day was in the service.

Then on January 2, 1949, the program moved to CBS and it ran there until May 22, 1955. Bob Crosby replaced Phil Harris on September 14, 1952.
The Best of Benny, which were repeat broadcasts, aired on CBS from October 28, 1956 to June 22, 1958.

Jack's first appearance on the radio occurred while he was interviewed by Ed Sullivan. His first words over the microphone were "This is Jack Benny talking. There will be a slight pause while you say 'Who cares?'" This interview lead to the first radio contract with Canada Dry. This first program was mainly musical with George Olsen performing seven musical numbers and Jack was the master of ceremonies.

According to John Dunning, The Jack Benny Program evolved over time from its vaudeville roots to become the quintessential American radio comedy show. It was a jigsaw puzzle where pieces were added over the years. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach, but were unable to sustain it.

Jack worked with Harry Conn to develop his character as well as the character of Mary Livingstone, which he had played by his wife. Mary Livingstone was a very sarcastic but well meaning friend to Jack. Sometimes she was presented as a date, sometimes as a love interest, but often she was just there. Her role changed from plot to plot and she never really was a steady girlfriend to Jack.

In 1933 Jack began arguing with his cast, adding another characteristic which led to less musical numbers and more comedy. In April of 1934 Don Wilson was added to the program and Don was Jack's announcer all the way up to the end of the TV show in 1965. He was a target of Jack's jokes mostly about his weight even though he was never really overweight. The next piece added was when Phil Harris joined the show in 1936. Phil's character was a skirt chasing, arrogant, hip-talking band leader who constantly put Jack down. He is remembered for referring to Jack as Jackson.

Then came Eddie Anderson who started playing the part of a train porter and then joined the cast as a regular as Rochester in June of 1937, as Benny's personal valet. Early in the show's run he often talked about gambling or going out with women, but later he just generally complained about his lack of salary.

The last piece of the puzzle was supplied by the arrival of Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty. McNulty is better known as Dennis Day. Dennis was always in his early twenties no matter how old he actually was. His character was sweet but not very bright. One of the few memorable aspects of the program was the fifteen year feud with fellow radio actor Fred Allen. In one occasion when ratings were falling "The I Can't Stand Jack Benny Because -" contest was run, which boosted ratings right back up.

Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

This synopsis was adapted from John Dunning's The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio.

These are episodes from the 1954-1955 season.
This page is one of a set of individual OTRR "Jack Benny - Single Episode" pages:
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1932-1934
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1934-1935
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1935-1936
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1936-1937
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1937-1938
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1938-1939
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1939-1940
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1940-1941
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1941-1942
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1942-1943
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1943-1944
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1944-1945
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1945-1946
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1946-1947
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1947-1948
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1948-1949
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1949-1950
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1950-1951
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1951-1952
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1952-1953
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1953-1954
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #1
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #2

The episodes on the pages above and much, much more can be found at The Jack Benny Program.




From the Old Time Radio Researchers Group. See "Notes" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

Listen to thousands of Old Time Radio shows and episodes. Have you heard an amazing nostalgic moment from JB 1954-11-28 Jack takes Dennis to the psychiatrist? You can quickly make snippets of your favorite moments from Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 or clip out those classic Old Time Radio commercials for a window into advertising history. Make a playlist of your favorite episodes and highlights and share it with your friends and family. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save JB 1954-11-28 Jack takes Dennis to the psychiatrist.
JB 1954-12-26 Jack visits a sick Dennis | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM


The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932 until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. The Canada Dry Program was on the air from May 2, 1932 until October 26, 1932. It starred Jack Benny. The announcer was George Hicks with George Olsen and his wife Ethel Shutta providing music and vocals, and Jack's wife, Sadye Marks, as Mary Livingstone. The show moved over to CBS on October 30, 1932 to January 26, 1933. On CBS the music was provided by Ted Weems and his orchestra.

The next sponsor was General Motors and the program was called The Chevrolet Program. It aired on NBC from March 17, 1933 until April 1, 1934. The cast included Jack and Mary with singers James Melton in 1933 and Frank Parker from 1933 to 1934. The announcers were Howard Claney in 1933 and Alois Havrilla from 1933 to 1934. Music was supplied by Frank Black.

The program became The General Tire Show from April 6 to September 28, 1934. Joining Jack and Mary was Frank Parker, and Jack's long-time announcer Don Wilson was added. Music was performed by Don Bestor on the east coast and Jimmy Grier on the west coast.
The Jello Program was on the air from October 14, 1934 to May 31, 1942. The show started on the Blue Network until October 4, 1936, then moved to the Red Network thereafter. The cast included Jack and Mary with Don Wilson. Music was provided by Johnny Green in 1934 and 35 and then Phil Harris started in 1936. The program singers were first Michael Bartlett, then Kenny Baker from November 3, 1935, and finally Dennis Day joined the show on October 8, 1939. Eddie Anderson became a regular on June 20, 1937. The show was produced in Hollywood permanently starting in April of 1935.

Post became the next sponsor and the show was called The Grape Nuts and Grape Nuts Flakes Program. It aired on NBC and ran from October 4, 1942 until June 2, 1944. It starred the regular cast of Jack, Mary, Eddie, Dennis, Phil and Don.

Next came The Lucky Strike Program which aired on NBC from October 1, 1944 to December 26, 1948. The only change to the cast was Larry Stevens who flew in while Dennis Day was in the service.

Then on January 2, 1949, the program moved to CBS and it ran there until May 22, 1955. Bob Crosby replaced Phil Harris on September 14, 1952.
The Best of Benny, which were repeat broadcasts, aired on CBS from October 28, 1956 to June 22, 1958.

Jack's first appearance on the radio occurred while he was interviewed by Ed Sullivan. His first words over the microphone were "This is Jack Benny talking. There will be a slight pause while you say 'Who cares?'" This interview lead to the first radio contract with Canada Dry. This first program was mainly musical with George Olsen performing seven musical numbers and Jack was the master of ceremonies.

According to John Dunning, The Jack Benny Program evolved over time from its vaudeville roots to become the quintessential American radio comedy show. It was a jigsaw puzzle where pieces were added over the years. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach, but were unable to sustain it.

Jack worked with Harry Conn to develop his character as well as the character of Mary Livingstone, which he had played by his wife. Mary Livingstone was a very sarcastic but well meaning friend to Jack. Sometimes she was presented as a date, sometimes as a love interest, but often she was just there. Her role changed from plot to plot and she never really was a steady girlfriend to Jack.

In 1933 Jack began arguing with his cast, adding another characteristic which led to less musical numbers and more comedy. In April of 1934 Don Wilson was added to the program and Don was Jack's announcer all the way up to the end of the TV show in 1965. He was a target of Jack's jokes mostly about his weight even though he was never really overweight. The next piece added was when Phil Harris joined the show in 1936. Phil's character was a skirt chasing, arrogant, hip-talking band leader who constantly put Jack down. He is remembered for referring to Jack as Jackson.

Then came Eddie Anderson who started playing the part of a train porter and then joined the cast as a regular as Rochester in June of 1937, as Benny's personal valet. Early in the show's run he often talked about gambling or going out with women, but later he just generally complained about his lack of salary.

The last piece of the puzzle was supplied by the arrival of Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty. McNulty is better known as Dennis Day. Dennis was always in his early twenties no matter how old he actually was. His character was sweet but not very bright. One of the few memorable aspects of the program was the fifteen year feud with fellow radio actor Fred Allen. In one occasion when ratings were falling "The I Can't Stand Jack Benny Because -" contest was run, which boosted ratings right back up.

Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

This synopsis was adapted from John Dunning's The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio.

These are episodes from the 1954-1955 season.
This page is one of a set of individual OTRR "Jack Benny - Single Episode" pages:
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1932-1934
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1934-1935
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1935-1936
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1936-1937
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1937-1938
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1938-1939
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1939-1940
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1940-1941
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1941-1942
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1942-1943
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1943-1944
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1944-1945
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1945-1946
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1946-1947
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1947-1948
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1948-1949
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1949-1950
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1950-1951
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1951-1952
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1952-1953
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1953-1954
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #1
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #2

The episodes on the pages above and much, much more can be found at The Jack Benny Program.




From the Old Time Radio Researchers Group. See "Notes" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

Listen to thousands of Old Time Radio shows and episodes. Have you heard an amazing nostalgic moment from JB 1954-12-26 Jack visits a sick Dennis? You can quickly make snippets of your favorite moments from Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 or clip out those classic Old Time Radio commercials for a window into advertising history. Make a playlist of your favorite episodes and highlights and share it with your friends and family. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save JB 1954-12-26 Jack visits a sick Dennis.
JB 1955-04-17 Guest Bob Hope - Bob and Jack double-date | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM


The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932 until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. The Canada Dry Program was on the air from May 2, 1932 until October 26, 1932. It starred Jack Benny. The announcer was George Hicks with George Olsen and his wife Ethel Shutta providing music and vocals, and Jack's wife, Sadye Marks, as Mary Livingstone. The show moved over to CBS on October 30, 1932 to January 26, 1933. On CBS the music was provided by Ted Weems and his orchestra.

The next sponsor was General Motors and the program was called The Chevrolet Program. It aired on NBC from March 17, 1933 until April 1, 1934. The cast included Jack and Mary with singers James Melton in 1933 and Frank Parker from 1933 to 1934. The announcers were Howard Claney in 1933 and Alois Havrilla from 1933 to 1934. Music was supplied by Frank Black.

The program became The General Tire Show from April 6 to September 28, 1934. Joining Jack and Mary was Frank Parker, and Jack's long-time announcer Don Wilson was added. Music was performed by Don Bestor on the east coast and Jimmy Grier on the west coast.
The Jello Program was on the air from October 14, 1934 to May 31, 1942. The show started on the Blue Network until October 4, 1936, then moved to the Red Network thereafter. The cast included Jack and Mary with Don Wilson. Music was provided by Johnny Green in 1934 and 35 and then Phil Harris started in 1936. The program singers were first Michael Bartlett, then Kenny Baker from November 3, 1935, and finally Dennis Day joined the show on October 8, 1939. Eddie Anderson became a regular on June 20, 1937. The show was produced in Hollywood permanently starting in April of 1935.

Post became the next sponsor and the show was called The Grape Nuts and Grape Nuts Flakes Program. It aired on NBC and ran from October 4, 1942 until June 2, 1944. It starred the regular cast of Jack, Mary, Eddie, Dennis, Phil and Don.

Next came The Lucky Strike Program which aired on NBC from October 1, 1944 to December 26, 1948. The only change to the cast was Larry Stevens who flew in while Dennis Day was in the service.

Then on January 2, 1949, the program moved to CBS and it ran there until May 22, 1955. Bob Crosby replaced Phil Harris on September 14, 1952.
The Best of Benny, which were repeat broadcasts, aired on CBS from October 28, 1956 to June 22, 1958.

Jack's first appearance on the radio occurred while he was interviewed by Ed Sullivan. His first words over the microphone were "This is Jack Benny talking. There will be a slight pause while you say 'Who cares?'" This interview lead to the first radio contract with Canada Dry. This first program was mainly musical with George Olsen performing seven musical numbers and Jack was the master of ceremonies.

According to John Dunning, The Jack Benny Program evolved over time from its vaudeville roots to become the quintessential American radio comedy show. It was a jigsaw puzzle where pieces were added over the years. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach, but were unable to sustain it.

Jack worked with Harry Conn to develop his character as well as the character of Mary Livingstone, which he had played by his wife. Mary Livingstone was a very sarcastic but well meaning friend to Jack. Sometimes she was presented as a date, sometimes as a love interest, but often she was just there. Her role changed from plot to plot and she never really was a steady girlfriend to Jack.

In 1933 Jack began arguing with his cast, adding another characteristic which led to less musical numbers and more comedy. In April of 1934 Don Wilson was added to the program and Don was Jack's announcer all the way up to the end of the TV show in 1965. He was a target of Jack's jokes mostly about his weight even though he was never really overweight. The next piece added was when Phil Harris joined the show in 1936. Phil's character was a skirt chasing, arrogant, hip-talking band leader who constantly put Jack down. He is remembered for referring to Jack as Jackson.

Then came Eddie Anderson who started playing the part of a train porter and then joined the cast as a regular as Rochester in June of 1937, as Benny's personal valet. Early in the show's run he often talked about gambling or going out with women, but later he just generally complained about his lack of salary.

The last piece of the puzzle was supplied by the arrival of Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty. McNulty is better known as Dennis Day. Dennis was always in his early twenties no matter how old he actually was. His character was sweet but not very bright. One of the few memorable aspects of the program was the fifteen year feud with fellow radio actor Fred Allen. In one occasion when ratings were falling "The I Can't Stand Jack Benny Because -" contest was run, which boosted ratings right back up.

Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

This synopsis was adapted from John Dunning's The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio.

These are episodes from the 1954-1955 season.
This page is one of a set of individual OTRR "Jack Benny - Single Episode" pages:
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1932-1934
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1934-1935
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1935-1936
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1936-1937
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1937-1938
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1938-1939
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1939-1940
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1940-1941
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1941-1942
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1942-1943
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1943-1944
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1944-1945
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1945-1946
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1946-1947
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1947-1948
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1948-1949
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1949-1950
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1950-1951
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1951-1952
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1952-1953
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1953-1954
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #1
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #2

The episodes on the pages above and much, much more can be found at The Jack Benny Program.




From the Old Time Radio Researchers Group. See "Notes" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

Listen to thousands of Old Time Radio shows and episodes. Have you heard an amazing nostalgic moment from JB 1955-04-17 Guest Bob Hope - Bob and Jack double-date? You can quickly make snippets of your favorite moments from Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 or clip out those classic Old Time Radio commercials for a window into advertising history. Make a playlist of your favorite episodes and highlights and share it with your friends and family. Download the Vurbl app and listen, snip or save JB 1955-04-17 Guest Bob Hope - Bob and Jack double-date.
JB 1955-04-03 Ed comes up from the vault | Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955 | Audio THE JACK BENNY PROGRAM


The Jack Benny Program aired from May 2, 1932 until June 22, 1958. The show was identified by different names based on the particular sponsor at the time. The Canada Dry Program was on the air from May 2, 1932 until October 26, 1932. It starred Jack Benny. The announcer was George Hicks with George Olsen and his wife Ethel Shutta providing music and vocals, and Jack's wife, Sadye Marks, as Mary Livingstone. The show moved over to CBS on October 30, 1932 to January 26, 1933. On CBS the music was provided by Ted Weems and his orchestra.

The next sponsor was General Motors and the program was called The Chevrolet Program. It aired on NBC from March 17, 1933 until April 1, 1934. The cast included Jack and Mary with singers James Melton in 1933 and Frank Parker from 1933 to 1934. The announcers were Howard Claney in 1933 and Alois Havrilla from 1933 to 1934. Music was supplied by Frank Black.

The program became The General Tire Show from April 6 to September 28, 1934. Joining Jack and Mary was Frank Parker, and Jack's long-time announcer Don Wilson was added. Music was performed by Don Bestor on the east coast and Jimmy Grier on the west coast.
The Jello Program was on the air from October 14, 1934 to May 31, 1942. The show started on the Blue Network until October 4, 1936, then moved to the Red Network thereafter. The cast included Jack and Mary with Don Wilson. Music was provided by Johnny Green in 1934 and 35 and then Phil Harris started in 1936. The program singers were first Michael Bartlett, then Kenny Baker from November 3, 1935, and finally Dennis Day joined the show on October 8, 1939. Eddie Anderson became a regular on June 20, 1937. The show was produced in Hollywood permanently starting in April of 1935.

Post became the next sponsor and the show was called The Grape Nuts and Grape Nuts Flakes Program. It aired on NBC and ran from October 4, 1942 until June 2, 1944. It starred the regular cast of Jack, Mary, Eddie, Dennis, Phil and Don.

Next came The Lucky Strike Program which aired on NBC from October 1, 1944 to December 26, 1948. The only change to the cast was Larry Stevens who flew in while Dennis Day was in the service.

Then on January 2, 1949, the program moved to CBS and it ran there until May 22, 1955. Bob Crosby replaced Phil Harris on September 14, 1952.
The Best of Benny, which were repeat broadcasts, aired on CBS from October 28, 1956 to June 22, 1958.

Jack's first appearance on the radio occurred while he was interviewed by Ed Sullivan. His first words over the microphone were "This is Jack Benny talking. There will be a slight pause while you say 'Who cares?'" This interview lead to the first radio contract with Canada Dry. This first program was mainly musical with George Olsen performing seven musical numbers and Jack was the master of ceremonies.

According to John Dunning, The Jack Benny Program evolved over time from its vaudeville roots to become the quintessential American radio comedy show. It was a jigsaw puzzle where pieces were added over the years. For four decades Jack played the part of a vain, miserly, argumentative skinflint. Others tried this approach, but were unable to sustain it.

Jack worked with Harry Conn to develop his character as well as the character of Mary Livingstone, which he had played by his wife. Mary Livingstone was a very sarcastic but well meaning friend to Jack. Sometimes she was presented as a date, sometimes as a love interest, but often she was just there. Her role changed from plot to plot and she never really was a steady girlfriend to Jack.

In 1933 Jack began arguing with his cast, adding another characteristic which led to less musical numbers and more comedy. In April of 1934 Don Wilson was added to the program and Don was Jack's announcer all the way up to the end of the TV show in 1965. He was a target of Jack's jokes mostly about his weight even though he was never really overweight. The next piece added was when Phil Harris joined the show in 1936. Phil's character was a skirt chasing, arrogant, hip-talking band leader who constantly put Jack down. He is remembered for referring to Jack as Jackson.

Then came Eddie Anderson who started playing the part of a train porter and then joined the cast as a regular as Rochester in June of 1937, as Benny's personal valet. Early in the show's run he often talked about gambling or going out with women, but later he just generally complained about his lack of salary.

The last piece of the puzzle was supplied by the arrival of Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty. McNulty is better known as Dennis Day. Dennis was always in his early twenties no matter how old he actually was. His character was sweet but not very bright. One of the few memorable aspects of the program was the fifteen year feud with fellow radio actor Fred Allen. In one occasion when ratings were falling "The I Can't Stand Jack Benny Because -" contest was run, which boosted ratings right back up.

Benjamin Kubelsky, who we know and love as Jack Benny, truly is a national treasure. So take the time to listen to some great, wholesome comedy that all the family can enjoy.

This synopsis was adapted from John Dunning's The Encyclopedia of Old Time Radio.

These are episodes from the 1954-1955 season.
This page is one of a set of individual OTRR "Jack Benny - Single Episode" pages:
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1932-1934
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1934-1935
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1935-1936
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1936-1937
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1937-1938
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1938-1939
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1939-1940
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1940-1941
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1941-1942
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1942-1943
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1943-1944
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1944-1945
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1945-1946
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1946-1947
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1947-1948
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1948-1949
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1949-1950
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1950-1951
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1951-1952
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1952-1953
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1953-1954
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - 1954-1955
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #1
Jack Benny - Single Episodes - As A Guest Star #2

The episodes on the pages above and much, much more can be found at The Jack Benny Program.




From the Old Time Radio Researchers Group. See "Notes" Section below for more information on the OTRR.

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