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5 photographers (Brent Bergherm, Jeff Harmon, Connor Hibbs, Erica Kay, Brian McGuckin) take turns covering listener questions, photography news, and the famous photography "doodads" of the week with each round table discussion episode. This is the podcast for enthusiast and professional photography nerds who want to level up and master their photography--without the fluff of a "talk show." The team has a special skill for covering advanced level photography techniques in a way that less exper… Continue Reading >>
5 photographers (Brent Bergherm, Jeff Harmon, Connor Hibbs, Erica Kay, Brian McGuckin) take turns covering listener questions, photography news, and the famous photography "doodads" of the week with each round table discussion episode. This is the podcast for enthusiast and professional photography nerds who want to level up and master their photography--without the fluff of a "talk show." The team has a special skill for covering advanced level photography techniques in a way that less experienced photographers can understand. They don't talk down to newer photographers yet provide tips that help advanced photographers. Come join us as we all work to master our photography together! << Show Less
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Finding and Communicating With Clients Tips For Finding Photography Clients



It is hard for me to believe, but there are some people who can very naturally approach and talk to people. On top of that, some of those may also have the advantage of being well established in their community. Those people may not need the tips offered here. For everyone else, here are some ideas you can use to help you find photography clients.



Practice Working With People



It starts with being willing to practice working with people. It may not be comfortable for you. Believe me, I get it if you don’t find it easy to talk to someone you don’t know. Not only do I feel totally uncomfortable doing that, the other person often feels that, making it doubly awkward.



Don’t give up on it. Just like you can learn how to make good images, you can learn how to work with people. Think about what it took to learn how to use your camera. Maybe you feel like you are still learning how to use your camera (I know I am), but learning how to do anything requires effort and practice. Some have a natural gift to learn something and excel at it, but most of us have to work hard and practice to become proficient with a skill.



Talking to perfect strangers and working through to the point where they may become your clients may never become easy for you. It may never be something you look forward to. But no matter how challenging you find it as you get started, everyone can get good enough at it to win clients.



Start With Kids



One of the easiest ways to get started practicing with people is to reach out to those around you and ask if you can do a shoot with their kids. Parents are usually very happy to have someone make pictures of their children as long as the camera is not pointed at them.



Plus you get to work with the kids. Kids may bring some of their own challenges in being able to sit still enough or follow directions, but they generally are not worried about how they look or get anxious just because you point a camera at them. Adults tend to freeze up considerably as soon as a “real” camera is pointed at them.



Ask your neighbors, the people at your church. If you aren’t completely confident in your photography skills yet, let them know you are practicing but they can have any of the images they want for free if you can practice with their children.



That said, DO NOT PRACTICE ON YOUR KIDS! There are only so many pictures your own kids are going to let you make of them. You don’t want to waste them as you are learning how to do lighting or have the right settings on your camera. It doesn’t make a ton of sense, but the neighbor kid seems to be fine with making a lot of pictures and sort of having fun with it while your own kids find it a chore very quickly.



Farmer’s Market



It may not be called this, but every town has some kind of weekend gathering place where people come together to sell various goods. You can usually buy an inexpensive spot at the market, set up a photo booth of sorts, and then just practice your skills at talking to people and inviting them to come and make a picture with you.



You don’t have to be perfect with your lighting or camera settings. You don’t have to be great at talking to people. This is a chance to practice with a wide variety of people and improve all of these skills at the same time.



These markets tend to be in the middle of the day when there is very harsh sunlight, so you will need some kind of structure to shoot under. You could ask around to borrow a pop up shade,
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Finding and Communicating With Clients Tips For Finding Photography Clients



It is hard for me to believe, but there are some people who can very naturally approach and talk to people. On top of that, some of those may also have the advantage of being well established in their community. Those people may not need the tips offered here. For everyone else, here are some ideas you can use to help you find photography clients.



Practice Working With People



It starts with being willing to practice working with people. It may not be comfortable for you. Believe me, I get it if you don’t find it easy to talk to someone you don’t know. Not only do I feel totally uncomfortable doing that, the other person often feels that, making it doubly awkward.



Don’t give up on it. Just like you can learn how to make good images, you can learn how to work with people. Think about what it took to learn how to use your camera. Maybe you feel like you are still learning how to use your camera (I know I am), but learning how to do anything requires effort and practice. Some have a natural gift to learn something and excel at it, but most of us have to work hard and practice to become proficient with a skill.



Talking to perfect strangers and working through to the point where they may become your clients may never become easy for you. It may never be something you look forward to. But no matter how challenging you find it as you get started, everyone can get good enough at it to win clients.



Start With Kids



One of the easiest ways to get started practicing with people is to reach out to those around you and ask if you can do a shoot with their kids. Parents are usually very happy to have someone make pictures of their children as long as the camera is not pointed at them.



Plus you get to work with the kids. Kids may bring some of their own challenges in being able to sit still enough or follow directions, but they generally are not worried about how they look or get anxious just because you point a camera at them. Adults tend to freeze up considerably as soon as a “real” camera is pointed at them.



Ask your neighbors, the people at your church. If you aren’t completely confident in your photography skills yet, let them know you are practicing but they can have any of the images they want for free if you can practice with their children.



That said, DO NOT PRACTICE ON YOUR KIDS! There are only so many pictures your own kids are going to let you make of them. You don’t want to waste them as you are learning how to do lighting or have the right settings on your camera. It doesn’t make a ton of sense, but the neighbor kid seems to be fine with making a lot of pictures and sort of having fun with it while your own kids find it a chore very quickly.



Farmer’s Market



It may not be called this, but every town has some kind of weekend gathering place where people come together to sell various goods. You can usually buy an inexpensive spot at the market, set up a photo booth of sorts, and then just practice your skills at talking to people and inviting them to come and make a picture with you.



You don’t have to be perfect with your lighting or camera settings. You don’t have to be great at talking to people. This is a chance to practice with a wide variety of people and improve all of these skills at the same time.



These markets tend to be in the middle of the day when there is very harsh sunlight, so you will need some kind of structure to shoot under. You could ask around to borrow a pop up shade,
Making Good Headshots With Levi Sim Everyone needs headshots. It used to only be those at high positions in bigger companies were the only people who needed professional headshots, but thanks to social media it is something everyone needs. Here is how a photographer can get started into meeting some of that demand. Headshots Are About People The first thing you have to do is work ...
The post Making Good Headshots With Levi Sim appeared first on Master Photography Podcast.
How To Get Your Photography Website Noticed The common mistakes made by photographers that prevent their websites from begging noticed by people looking for their services and/or images. Should Photographers Have A Website Here In 2021? With so many social media options today, does a photographer really need a website? Instagram is made for photos, and there so many people are active on social media. Why not ...
The post How To Get Your Photography Website Noticed appeared first on Master Photography Podcast.
5 Reasons Every Photographer Needs An L-Bracket What Is An L-Bracket? Unlike other pieces of equipment, like say the intervalometer where it seems like the name of the thing is overly complicated, an “L” bracket is a pretty simple thing.  A piece of metal in the shape of an “L”.  The long side of the L goes under your camera and screws into the tripod mount, the ...
The post 5 Reasons Every Photographer Needs An L-Bracket appeared first on Master Photography Podcast.
Luminosity Masking and Lumenzia v9 What Is Luminosity Masking? Check out Photo Taco episode What Is Luminosity Masking from November 2018. What’s New In Lumenzia v9? Check out Greg&#8217;s release notes page and the video demonstrating the new features. Here are Greg&#8217;s favorite new features: Fade slider  Reload the last orange preview layers. Sky button (sample from all layers, choose replacement, better guidance through situations ...
The post Luminosity Masking and Lumenzia v9 appeared first on Master Photography Podcast.
2021 Photography Predictions 2020 Photography Predictions Nick &#8211; Sony releases the A7iv &#8211; I think this camera will be a minor update from the riii, mostly ergonomic, with some minor tweaks in the internals.  Same sensor, better view finder, bigger grip, better eye and animal AF.  After the massive success of the a7iii.. The A7iv will be a little lackluster, but a decent ...
The post 2021 Photography Predictions appeared first on Master Photography Podcast.
Stretch Your Photography Skills in 2021 We are coming to the close of another year.&#160; I highly recommend every photographer go through the photos they created in 2020 and choose the ten best.&#160; I have talked about this many times here on Master Photography and did an episode of why and how to choose your top ten photos over on Photo Taco.&#160;&#160; Doing a top ten ...
The post Stretch Your Photography Skills in 2021 appeared first on Master Photography Podcast.
Color Space Workflow Check out the full instructions and show notes for this episode in the Practical Guide To Color Space Workflow For Photographers. Doodads of the Week Jeff: SMALLRIG Multi-Functional Ballhead Clamp Magic Arm Adapter ($11).  Very helpful little gadget that allows me to attach things to my light stands or tripod.  I use it mostly for a receiver of a wireless ...
The post Color Space Workflow appeared first on Master Photography Podcast.
Getting Started With Team and Individual Sports Photography Tips on how to get started in doing team and individual (T&#38;I) sports photography, including a way to quadruple your potential for income! Check out the full how-to article that goes along with this episode over at https://phototacopodcast.com/getting-started-with-team-sports-photography/
The post Getting Started With Team and Individual Sports Photography appeared first on Master Photography Podcast.
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