Group 4 Created with Sketch.
 
Vurbl Verified Station

Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News

Play All
547210 Listens
4,831 Subscribers
Share Path Report
Past Daily: News, History, Music And An Enormous Sound Archive.

Gordon Skene, two-time Grammy Nominee and archivist runs The Gordon Skene Sound Archive and this website, which is dedicated to preserving and encouraging an interest in history and historic news, events, musical performance of all types, and cultural aspects of our society. Past Daily is the only place on the Internet where you can hear a Nixon speech, listen to an interview with John Cassavettes or play a broadcast of Charles … Continue Reading >>
Past Daily: News, History, Music And An Enormous Sound Archive.

Gordon Skene, two-time Grammy Nominee and archivist runs The Gordon Skene Sound Archive and this website, which is dedicated to preserving and encouraging an interest in history and historic news, events, musical performance of all types, and cultural aspects of our society. Past Daily is the only place on the Internet where you can hear a Nixon speech, listen to an interview with John Cassavettes or play a broadcast of Charles Munch rehearsing the Boston Symphony in 1950, all in the same place. It's living history and it's timeless.

For copyright inquiries, see https://pastdaily.com. << Show Less
Featured Audio



Hollywood Bowl – No On 14 Rally – Sept. 23, 1964 – Part 1



Hollywood Bowl – No On 14 Rally – Sept. 23, 1964 – Part 2

An all-star extravaganza – one of those Hollywood Bowl concerts never hea” id=”FQjg3rhM9x” vid=”FQjg3rhM9x” id-for-player=”FQjg3rhM9x” link=”/listen/hollywood-bowl-1964-modern-folk-quartet-joe-eddie-pete-seeger-joan-baez-and-more-no-on-prop-14-rally-FQjg3rhM9x/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Hollywood Bowl 1964 – Modern Folk Quartet, Joe & Eddie, Pete Seeger, Joan Baez And More – No On Prop. 14. Rally – Past Daily Pop Chronicles Modern Folk Quartet (MFQ) – a year after this concert they would head in a Specter direction.
Hollywood Bowl – No On 14 Rally – Sept. 23, 1964 – Part 1 & 2

An all-star extravaganza – one of those Hollywood Bowl concerts never heard, long-thought lost, destined to be destroyed and otherwise forgotten about. This time it's Folk Music mixed with a Political rally (both went hand-in-hand around this time). The rally was for Proposition 14, an initiative on the California ballot in the 1964 election that basically made housing discrimination legal. There were two rallies in opposition to the bill; one featuring folk acts, and another featuring Hollywood luminaries (along with The Kingston Trio, Nat "King" Cole, Nancy Wilson among others). I initially ran a small portion of this concert via my now-defunct Newstalgia website several years ago, and promised I would run the entire concert at some point. Time goes slips by rather quickly, and I was reminded a few weeks ago that I would run the whole concert. So here goes:
Folk Night – No On Prop. 14 Rally. The whole concert from September 23, 1964:
MC'd by the actor Richard Beymer (West Side Story and later, Twin Peaks), the acts featured are (in running order):
Part 1:
Joe Eddie
Hedy West
The Dillards
Theodore Bikel
Part 2: The Gray Singers
The Modern Folk Quartet
Pete Seeger (with guest appearance by "Ramblin" Jack Elliot
Joan Baez
Some of the acts won't ring many bells – and some were cornerstones of the protest movement. Joe Eddie, who open the show, were regular faces around the Hollywood/Southern California Folk Club scene from the late 1950s until 1966 when Joe Gilbert was killed in a car accident, returning from a gig in Seal Beach. Unlike the Y-Day concert, this one is entirely acoustic,so the sound quality is a lot better. But because the concert is a little over 3 hours, the tape runs out at the final chorus of "We Shall Overcome" at the end of the concert. So it fades out.
Snippets are a new way to share audio!
You can clip a small part of any file to share, add to playlist, and transcribe automatically. Just click the to create your snippet!
Top Snippets from Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
Simon and Garfunkel sing Scarborough Fair at 1970 Amsterdam Concert Simon and Garfunkel sing Scarborough Fair at 1970 Amsterdam Concert. This song was written for The Graduate movie with Dustin Hoffman.
Simon and Garfunkel Sing Mrs. Robinson Live This is clipped from the Simon & Garfunkel live show in Amsterdam in 1970… Mrs. Robinson, of course.
When he says he did LSD.. crazy When he says he did LSD.. crazy
May 11, 1941 – The Allies And The Latin-America Question – Past Daily Reference Room Even before America officially entered the War, there was deep concern that a possible invasion of the U.S. could come from either Alaska or Latin-America. Alaska because the Aleutian islands were the closest point and an invasion could be easily staged. South America by way of Axis sponsored overthrows of certain key Latin and South-American countries; countries who may have seemed ripe to be persuaded to abandon any alliances with the U.S. and instead align themselves with Berlin, Rome and Tokyo. Uruguay was already the scene of a certain amount of sympathy toward the Axis by supplying safe-harbor for the German Battleship Graf Spee, and German submarines were active near the Caribbean and off the Eastern coast of South America, sinking British supply ships at an increasing rate. A plot had already been uncovered laying plans for an overthrow of the Uruguay government, replacing it with a pro-Berlin one. So it was crucial that the U.S. shore up any diplomatic cracks with Latin-America to ensure the Western Hemisphere was solidly behind the Allied effort to defeat the Axis. This lecture, given by John I.B. McCullogh editor of the Foreign Policy Association’s Pan-American News tells of the debate going on, not only in Washington but in the Capitols of Latin-American countries over the possibilities of forming an alliance; one of mutual aid and security with the Allies. A proposal was made at the conference in Havana in July of 1940, but the events taking place between July 1940 and May of 1941 were dramatically altering the direction which the war was taking and the issue of how Latin America was feeling about the War in Europe and was there in fact solidarity among the South American countries. That was the big issue since the political makeup of Latin America was running the gamut from Democratic to Authoritarian. Like everything, it was a delicate maneuver hampered only by time and events. Here is that lecture, given on May 11, 1941 by the Foreign Policy Association in Washington D.C.
The Zemlinsky Quartet Plays Music Of Haydn, Dvorak, Suk And Zemlinsky – 2011 – Past Daily Mid-Week Concert The Zemlinsky String Quartet – in concert – Jagdsaal Schwetzingen – March 8, 2011 – SWRS-Radio/RNE Clasica –
April 22, 1970 – On Top Of Everything Else; Earth Day. Celebrating the first Earth Day and the state of the Ecology.
April 21, 1975 – Imminent Implosion In South Vietnam – Thieu Resigns – Saigon Surrounded. April 21, 1975 – Special Report on Situation In Vietnam – Gordon Skene Sound Collection
May 6, 1942 – Fall And Surrender Of Corregidor – Critical Situation In Madagascar – Tire And Gas Rationing Coming Up. May 6, 1942 – a dismal day for the Allies with news of the capitulation and surrender of Corregidor, a staunchly defended island and one of the last allied strongholds in the Philippines. Although Japanese attacks had steadily increased to the point it was almost impossible to mount a reasonable resistance, there was still flagging optimism that some last minute counter-attack would save the beleaguered fortress. It was finally announced that commanding General Wainright saw the situation as hopeless and surrendered to the Japanese invaders, along with some 7,000 defenders among them some 3,845 U.S. Army and Navy and Marine personnel. General Wainright opted to stay with the garrison and not escape. It was also reported that there was still stiff resistance by American troops on Mindanao Island. But that was only a matter of time. The surrender of Corregidor served as a bitter blow to the Allies in the South Pacific, but it also solidified opposition to the Japanese with a steady increase in Allied air activity and intensifying successes in the air war. The Soviet Press wrote that it would only be a matter of time before the Allies gained the upper hand in air strength in the Pacific. Small comfort, but comfort nonetheless. The Fall of Corregidor was serving as a rallying cry for many back home. Meanwhile, after the initial ease of the British invasion of Madagascar, Vichy French resistance to the invasion force was stiffening to the point the operation was going into the critical phase. Still, slow gains were being made by British forces. And hot on the heels of the success with Sugar rationing came news that Tires and Gas were next in line to be rationed. It was inevitable, but at least the notion of “whatever it takes” was front and center on Americans minds. And that’s just a small slice of what happened, this May 6, 1942 as reported by Alka-Seltzer’s News Of The World.
May 4, 1970 – Kent State – The Day America Killed Its Young. Many have said the events outside the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago started the shift in national opinion of the War in Vietnam. The events at Kent State (and a few days later at Jackson State) 52 years ago today, solidified that shift, and the killing of 4 students by National Guard troops galvanized it. It also displayed the stark division taking place in our society – between those supporting the War and those demanding we get out. A division which continues among those who demand we settle our difference through violence and those who say peaceful settlement is the only option. A lot has been written about this incident; it’s been the subject of investigations, and many correlations have been drawn between those events at Kent and Jackson State with those taking place recently in our country and those which continue and will probably continue until a sense of reason is introduced.. But on May 4, 1970 the country reacted with shock that this protest against the War in Vietnam, and the recent decision by President Nixon to invade Cambodia, had taken us this far. Nixon was elected in 1968 on the grounds he would end the war in Vietnam. The decision to invade Cambodia ran against that promise, and in fact was widening the War in Southeast Asia. It triggered a series of protests, beginning shortly after his announcement of the invasion on April 30th. Other news happened this day, as it always does. But the attention of the country was focused on Kent State University in Ohio and the sudden turn of events unfolding this day. Here is that newscast, via NBC Nightly News as it was broadcast on May 4, 1970.
Load More Snippets
Playlists
New Names – New Faces – New Music The station where you get to hear new or undiscovered artists and bands. Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
Past Daily Downbeat – Dig, We Must! Sounds both groovy and solid – frantic and mellow. Dive in. Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
Classical Music For Exploring. New pieces, old pieces, rare pieces, world premiers, scandals and breaths of fresh air. Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
The Mid-Week Concert The antidote to Road-Rage. Classical Music in all shapes, forms and sizes. Guaranteed to smooth the roughest of edges. Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
You're A Teenager . . . . The saga of life as a teenager in America from the 1940s to the 1990s – all the angst and all the craziness and all the tunes of the times – your life – your times. Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
Backstage Pass Concerts – festivals – living rooms – as long as it's live and people are clapping. Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
Jazz – Dig, We Must! Jazz – Jazz and more Jazz. Nothing but – from Big Band to Fusion and everything in between. If it swings, it's here. Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
Past Daily Soundbooth In the Studio – On Stage – whatever it is, it's live. Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News
Load More Playlists
Newest Audio

A little bit of fear goes a long way, and the Y2K fears were” id=”1ZxjkHq4ctG” vid=”1ZxjkHq4ctG” id-for-player=”1ZxjkHq4ctG” link=”/listen/y2k-and-the-coming-catastrophe-december-29-1999-1ZxjkHq4ctG/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Y2K And The Coming Catastrophe – December 29, 1999 Y2K and the coming catastrophe . . .so they said. That’s was what everyone was thinking about on this December 29th in 1999. Doomsday scenarios, fears that everything would stop and all would be chaos – life as we knew it would be over.

A little bit of fear goes a long way, and the Y2K fears were the latest in what we had to look forward to when the clocks struck midnight on New Years Eve.

But there was other, even stranger news, this December 29th. The wealthy parents of a severely disabled son were charged with abandoning him. The couple, Dawn and Richard Kelso went to the Emergency Room at a Delaware Hospital, carrying boxes of papers, toys, belongings and clothes. They wheeled the child in and left him there with a note saying they could no longer take care of their son Stephen who had Cerebral Palsy. The incident sparked outrage and a sense of amazing irony, since Richard Kelso was President of a $500 million a year corporation and Dawn Kelso was a volunteer advocate for disabled children. Despite family members attempts to white-wash the situation, saying they had to sleep in shifts because of no nursing help, brought little in the way of sympathy and the Kelsos were barred from having any contact with their son.

Meanwhile, catastrophe was hitting France in the way of weather, as some $2 billion in estimated damages swept over the country as flooding, winds and avalanches played havoc from the French coast to the German boarder.

Vice-President Al Gore‘s wife Tipper walked out of a Baltimore hospital earlier this day. Doctor’s would know in a week if the nodule removed from Gore’s Thyroid was malignant or not.

And that’s just a small sample of what went this roller-coaster December 29th in 1999 – coming up on the end of a millennium, as reported by the CBS World News Roundup.

And what a crap year it’s been – however, in 2003 REM wouldn’t know that. On the surface, it’s a great set from Glastonbury and one o” id=”1Zx9sBMm2UU” vid=”1Zx9sBMm2UU” id-for-player=”1Zx9sBMm2UU” link=”/listen/rem-live-at-glastonbury-2003-past-daily-soundbooth-1Zx9sBMm2UU/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
REM – Live At Glastonbury 2003 – Past Daily Soundbooth. REM a few days ahead of the New Year. Apropos in some ways, especially the set-closer; It’s The End Of The World (As We Know It). Somehow, sums the whole thing up.

And what a crap year it’s been – however, in 2003 REM wouldn’t know that. On the surface, it’s a great set from Glastonbury and one of the highlights of the festival that year. But since Music has that uncanny ability to express the right moods at just the right time, this concert just said it all – put it in words – said it in music.

With a good, long run from 1980 until 2011, REM were one of the premier Alternative American bands, kicking off a whole genre on this side of the Atlantic and crossing genres, from underground to mainstream, and doing it all with relative ease. They have often been cited as the band which pinpointed the change from post-Punk to Alternative in the U.S. and their breakthrough success was an inspiration for a tidal wave of bands following in their footsteps.

This set was part of the 2003 European tour which criss-crossed most of the festivals that summer and came hot on the heels of a Greatest Hits package Warners put out that year. It comes a year before the release of Around The Sun and featured their full-time touring drummer Bill Rieflin, replacing Bill Berry who quit in 1997, even though Berry would appear from time to time.

REM’s influence was wide. To many, they recalled the heady days of the 60s while exploring new musical territory. Even though they’ve dissolved some 5 years ago, they continue to inspire and be discovered by new fans – so their legacy continues and just gets bigger.

If you missed this Glasto performance – here’s your chance to get caught up.

Crank it up and get ready for New Years Eve. End of the world and all . . . .
Mikhail Rudy with Alexander Vedernikov and l'Orchestre de Radio France in concert 2012 – Past Daily Mid-Week Concert. Warhorses this week (or at least one), with celebrated French-Uzbek pianist Mikhail Rudy joining l’Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, led by Alexander Vedernikov in a concert live from the stage at Salle Pleyel in Paris and recorded for posterity by Radio France Musique on the afternoon of January 6, 2012.

The concert immediately begins with Mikail Rudy and the Orchestra in a performance of the First Piano Concerto of Tchaikovsky – and then concludes with Prokofiev’s Cendrillon.

As well as being a concert pianist, Mikhail Rudy has performed with jazz pianist Misha Alperin with whom he devised a program entitled Double Dream, performing improvised compositions based on the classical repertoire. This included partly rewritten and partly improvised works by Haydn, Beethoven, Schumann, Chopin, Debussy, Janáček and Scriabin. This program has already been performed in Norway, France and Germany receiving enthusiastic responses from audiences.

Rudy has also taken part in theatrical shows and has written a book, The Novel of a Pianist, published in 2008 by Le Rocher. He has also written and performed a theatrical and musical play after Władysław Szpilman’s book The Pianist along with French actor Robin Renucci. The show ran in Paris in 2005 for more than four months and received great acclaim from both audiences and critics alike. A tour of forty-five cities throughout France followed in 2006.

Rudy is a respected television broadcaster and is active in experimental video-filming and writing. He has prepared several series including a BBC television documentary on the life and works of Tchaikovsky and radio projects for France-Musique highlighting the life and works of composers such as Alexander Scriabin, Johannes Brahms, Karol Szymanowski and Leoš Janáček.

Press Play, settle in and enjoy the concert.
Mikhail Rudy with Alexander Vedernikov and l'Orchestre de Radio France in concert 2012 – Past Daily Mid-Week Concert. Warhorses this week (or at least one), with celebrated French-Uzbek pianist Mikhail Rudy joining l’Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, led by Alexander Vedernikov in a concert live from the stage at Salle Pleyel in Paris and recorded for posterity by Radio France Musique on the afternoon of January 6, 2012.

The concert immediately begins with Mikail Rudy and the Orchestra in a performance of the First Piano Concerto of Tchaikovsky – and then concludes with Prokofiev’s Cendrillon.

As well as being a concert pianist, Mikhail Rudy has performed with jazz pianist Misha Alperin with whom he devised a program entitled Double Dream, performing improvised compositions based on the classical repertoire. This included partly rewritten and partly improvised works by Haydn, Beethoven, Schumann, Chopin, Debussy, Janáček and Scriabin. This program has already been performed in Norway, France and Germany receiving enthusiastic responses from audiences.

Rudy has also taken part in theatrical shows and has written a book, The Novel of a Pianist, published in 2008 by Le Rocher. He has also written and performed a theatrical and musical play after Władysław Szpilman’s book The Pianist along with French actor Robin Renucci. The show ran in Paris in 2005 for more than four months and received great acclaim from both audiences and critics alike. A tour of forty-five cities throughout France followed in 2006.

Rudy is a respected television broadcaster and is active in experimental video-filming and writing. He has prepared several series including a BBC television documentary on the life and works of Tchaikovsky and radio projects for France-Musique highlighting the life and works of composers such as Alexander Scriabin, Johannes Brahms, Karol Szymanowski and Leoš Janáček.

Press Play, settle in and enjoy the concert.
Java: Sign Of Things To Come – December 28, 1945 News was breaking this day in the area we now know as Indonesia but in 1945 was known as Java in the Dutch East Indies. No sooner had the ink dried and British and American forces withdrew from the bases they used during the war, than fighting erupted between rebel forces and the Dutch Army and had spread to New Guinea with some 14 dead and an uncounted number of wounded in its wake.

Trouble had been brewing for some time. The colonial power, The Netherlands had been occupied by Germany during the war, had its resources drained and was in no position to resume control over this area of the Pacific. The Dutch East Indies themselves were captured and held by the Japanese until they were forced to abandon the island-nation towards the final days of the war. There were hopes, now the war had ended, that Indonesia would emerge as one of the first of the newly independent states. The Netherlands however, was reluctant to cede power and the forces seeking independence from the Netherlands were staging armed attacks in and around Java as a way of forcibly persuading.

For all intents and purposes, the situation in Java and The Dutch East Indies wasn’t going to end well. But it would be a story repeated over and over during the coming years and decades as former colonial powers no longer could afford the dubious luxury of possessing lands beyond their borders and it was time to let go.

So this day in 1945, Mutual reporter Don Bell described a situation getting worse, as being relayed by people traveling in and around the area that rebel forces had spread to New Guinea and that fighting was intensifying throughout Java and the region in general.

Peace may have been settling in over other parts of the world, but the situation in Java and the Dutch East Indies was eluding of more things to come. 1946 was going to be interesting.

Here is that report from Don Bell as it was broadcast on December 28, 1945.

And what a crap year it’s been – however, in 2003 REM wouldn’t know that. On the surface, it’s a great set from Glastonbury and one o” id=”1Zx9sCfjJG8″ vid=”1Zx9sCfjJG8″ id-for-player=”1Zx9sCfjJG8″ link=”/listen/rem-live-at-glastonbury-2003-past-daily-soundbooth-1Zx9sCfjJG8/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
REM – Live At Glastonbury 2003 – Past Daily Soundbooth. REM a few days ahead of the New Year. Apropos in some ways, especially the set-closer; It’s The End Of The World (As We Know It). Somehow, sums the whole thing up.

And what a crap year it’s been – however, in 2003 REM wouldn’t know that. On the surface, it’s a great set from Glastonbury and one of the highlights of the festival that year. But since Music has that uncanny ability to express the right moods at just the right time, this concert just said it all – put it in words – said it in music.

With a good, long run from 1980 until 2011, REM were one of the premier Alternative American bands, kicking off a whole genre on this side of the Atlantic and crossing genres, from underground to mainstream, and doing it all with relative ease. They have often been cited as the band which pinpointed the change from post-Punk to Alternative in the U.S. and their breakthrough success was an inspiration for a tidal wave of bands following in their footsteps.

This set was part of the 2003 European tour which criss-crossed most of the festivals that summer and came hot on the heels of a Greatest Hits package Warners put out that year. It comes a year before the release of Around The Sun and featured their full-time touring drummer Bill Rieflin, replacing Bill Berry who quit in 1997, even though Berry would appear from time to time.

REM’s influence was wide. To many, they recalled the heady days of the 60s while exploring new musical territory. Even though they’ve dissolved some 5 years ago, they continue to inspire and be discovered by new fans – so their legacy continues and just gets bigger.

If you missed this Glasto performance – here’s your chance to get caught up.

Crank it up and get ready for New Years Eve. End of the world and all . . . .

The situation was described a” id=”1ZwxiV8eLm0″ vid=”1ZwxiV8eLm0″ id-for-player=”1ZwxiV8eLm0″ link=”/listen/solidarity-in-silesia-miners-on-strike-december-27-1981-1ZwxiV8eLm0/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
Solidarity In Silesia – Miners On Strike – December 27, 1981 December 27, 1981 – Solidarity, despite official news reports to the contrary, was anything but dead. The protests now extended to the coal fields in Silesia, where over 1,000 Miners went on Strike, staying underground and refusing to leave as protest to Martial Law.

The situation was described as “difficult” when Polish Radio reported on the latest set of protests at the Piast Mine. The reports went on that attempts by authorities and members of the Miners families to begin talks. Broadcasts maintained that the situation throughout the country was “improving”, and that the strike at the Silesian mine was the last pocket of resistance. However, reports coming from other sources in Warsaw said Solidarity had been circulating clandestine bulletins, urging workers to strike. The bulletins also reported talks between Church officials and Communist party leaders were taking place, aimed at finding solutions to the crisis in the country. No further details were available.

Meanwhile, China expressed support for President Reagan‘s tough policy toward the Soviet Union. But at the same time, they voiced serious misgivings over the U.S. attitude toward third world countries and Taiwan.

And on the home front – 6,000 residents of the Detroit suburb of Stirling Heights were waiting to return to their homes, ending an evacutation which began the previous Saturday evening when 50,000 pounds of the swimming pool compound, Dry Chlorine, caught fire. Clouds of dangerous gas formed over the area, and Police were forced to evacuate a four-square mile area. Authorities didn’t know what caused the containers holding the chemicals to leak, but had managed to evacuate residents before any injuries or deaths occurred.

And along with continuing reports from Silesia, that’s a small chunk of news for this December 27, 1981 – as reported by CBS Radio‘s Hourly News, with commentary from the daily feature Spectrum.

The early days of Rock n’ Roll were something of a free-for-all as far as bands and music were concerned. Still not sure if this was a pass” id=”1ZwDMhOoUmc” vid=”1ZwDMhOoUmc” id-for-player=”1ZwDMhOoUmc” link=”/listen/the-burgie-big-beat-featuring-the-platters-and-jack-mcvea-1956-past-daily-pop-chronicles-1ZwDMhOoUmc/” is-authorized=”false” custom-styles=”margin: 0 24px 24px 0;”>
The Burgie Big Beat Featuring The Platters And Jack McVea – 1956 – Past Daily Pop Chronicles. The Burgie Big Beat featuring King Porter And his All-Stars with Jack McVea and The Platters – KNX-CBS Radio – May 10, 1956 – Gordon Skene Sound Collection –

The early days of Rock n’ Roll were something of a free-for-all as far as bands and music were concerned. Still not sure if this was a passing fancy or the wave of the future, mainstream (i.e. white) media (radio and TV) tread lightly – offering music aimed at teenagers yet, by the sounds of this show, sponsored by Burgermeister Beer one of the larger breweries on the West Coast, they were trying to figure out who the audience really was, and maybe it was young adults.

Prior to the mid-1950s, groups like The Platters and artists like Jack Mcvea would be relegated to Race-oriented (i.e. black) stations. But by 1956 the color lines were blurring and Black artists were selling in huge numbers in the white community. And so network radio took the plunge, albeit lightly. ABC Radio ran a late-night network show from The Apollo for a brief time. CBS Radio ran The Camel Rock n’ Roll Caravan with Alan Freed. But by this time radio was becoming the domain of the Disc Jockey and programs like The Burgie Big Beat were shots in the dark, since established stations like KNX (in Los Angeles where this show emanated from) had an audience substantially older than the ones buying Rock n’ Roll records. But they tried anyway.

I’m not sure how long this show lasted, since this is the only example of the series which ran in 1956. Burgermeister Beer was sponsoring several other music shows on other stations, but they featured music more skewed to the older demographic.

But in any event, this was one attempt at a live Rock n’ Roll show with an in-house band headed up by King Porter (of King Porter Stomp fame) and featuring Jack (Open The Door, Richard) McVea on sax. Musical guests were The Platters, and even though they don’t sing live, there is an interview with Tony Williams, the group’s lead singer.

Considering that some of the smaller stations in Los Angeles were already running live shows from The Olympic Auditorium featuring some of the most innovative R&B Artists at the time, this show seemed like small potatoes by comparison.

But the mainstream has always been a little/a lot behind the times. And in 1956 it was no more evident than in Los Angeles.

Here is that Burgie Big Beat program, as heard on May 10, 1956 over KNX in Los Angeles.
Food Crisis In Malawi – A View Of The World On Boxing Day – December 26, 2002 Looking at the news this day in 2002 as others saw it. BBC 5 Live news for 7:00 am on this Boxing Day in 2002. The news was primarily about the food crisis in Africa, most notably Malawi where Aid Agencies were scrambling to get much needed food to the people of Malawi where the situation was getting desperate.

Fingers were being pointed at relief agencies whose grain supplies were largely used up just prior to this current crisis. Fingers were crossed though, as it was beginning to rain and the much needed showers would help crops to grow in order to be harvested come April. But April was four months off and the rains were heavier than expected, turning drought conditions in some areas into mud-soaked masses of land. It was a period of anxiety.

Groups in Britain ran polls regarding the state of hunting in the UK. The results came back and it showed the majority of those who voted were in favor of regulation, but not an outright bad on the practice. And since Boxing Day was a big hunting day around the UK, with some quarter of a million people charging, guns blazing into the wilderness, some pro-hunting groups felt vindicated. Cold comfort for wildlife though.

And Police in Pakistan arrested three members of a banned radical Islamist group responsible for bombing a church in Central Pakistan on Christmas day where three girls were killed.

And that’s a little of what happened on the other side of the Atlantic on this Boxing Day, December 26, 2002 as reported by BBC’s Five-Live News.
Load More Audio
Stations We Like
Vurbl Entertainment: Movies, TV & Events All the best in entertainment on Vurbl. From classic tv and film moments to niche podcasts, this station is full of content you'll love that will also keep you busy. Whether you're looking for a new book to dive into or that one podcast everyone's been raving about, this station has it all in one place.

We are creating entertainment playlists of some of our favorites for you that we think you'll enjoy too. Subscribe now to Vurbl Entertainment!
Rock Solid Rock 'n' roll all night … and party once a week! Hosted by Pat Francis, Rock Solid is the comedy/music podcast that brings you music “both new and classic," plus lots of laughs and musical guests. Joining the fun are Producer Kyle Dodson and Pat’s hilarious rotating Co-Hosts: Mike Siegel, Christy Stratton and Murray Valeriano.
Claudette Robinson – First Lady of Motown Claudette Robinson was given the title of First Lady of Motown by Berry Gordy, founder of Motown/Tamla Records because she was the first woman on the label. She is also an original member of The Miracles who gave Motown their first #1 GOLD record with "Shop Around."