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Past Daily: Amazing Historical Concerts & News

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Past Daily: News, History, Music And An Enormous Sound Archive.

Gordon Skene, two-time Grammy Nominee and archivist runs The Gordon Skene Sound Archive and this website, which is dedicated to preserving and encouraging an interest in history and historic news, events, musical performance of all types, and cultural aspects of our society. Past Daily is the only place on the Internet where you can hear a Nixon speech, listen to an interview with John Cassavettes or play a broadcast of Charles … Continue Reading >>
Past Daily: News, History, Music And An Enormous Sound Archive.

Gordon Skene, two-time Grammy Nominee and archivist runs The Gordon Skene Sound Archive and this website, which is dedicated to preserving and encouraging an interest in history and historic news, events, musical performance of all types, and cultural aspects of our society. Past Daily is the only place on the Internet where you can hear a Nixon speech, listen to an interview with John Cassavettes or play a broadcast of Charles Munch rehearsing the Boston Symphony in 1950, all in the same place. It's living history and it's timeless.

For copyright inquiries, see https://pastdaily.com. << Show Less
Featured Audio
Hollywood Bowl 1964 - Modern Folk Quartet, Joe & Eddie, Pete Seeger, Joan Baez And More - No On Prop. 14. Rally - Past Daily Pop Chronicles Modern Folk Quartet (MFQ) - a year after this concert they would head in a Specter direction.
Hollywood Bowl - No On 14 Rally - Sept. 23, 1964 - Part 1 & 2

An all-star extravaganza - one of those Hollywood Bowl concerts never heard, long-thought lost, destined to be destroyed and otherwise forgotten about. This time it's Folk Music mixed with a Political rally (both went hand-in-hand around this time). The rally was for Proposition 14, an initiative on the California ballot in the 1964 election that basically made housing discrimination legal. There were two rallies in opposition to the bill; one featuring folk acts, and another featuring Hollywood luminaries (along with The Kingston Trio, Nat "King" Cole, Nancy Wilson among others). I initially ran a small portion of this concert via my now-defunct Newstalgia website several years ago, and promised I would run the entire concert at some point. Time goes slips by rather quickly, and I was reminded a few weeks ago that I would run the whole concert. So here goes:
Folk Night - No On Prop. 14 Rally. The whole concert from September 23, 1964:
MC'd by the actor Richard Beymer (West Side Story and later, Twin Peaks), the acts featured are (in running order):
Part 1:
Joe Eddie
Hedy West
The Dillards
Theodore Bikel
Part 2: The Gray Singers
The Modern Folk Quartet
Pete Seeger (with guest appearance by "Ramblin" Jack Elliot
Joan Baez
Some of the acts won't ring many bells - and some were cornerstones of the protest movement. Joe Eddie, who open the show, were regular faces around the Hollywood/Southern California Folk Club scene from the late 1950s until 1966 when Joe Gilbert was killed in a car accident, returning from a gig in Seal Beach. Unlike the Y-Day concert, this one is entirely acoustic,so the sound quality is a lot better. But because the concert is a little over 3 hours, the tape runs out at the final chorus of "We Shall Overcome" at the end of the concert. So it fades out.
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Amazing Joan Baez Live Performance at the Prop 14 show in the 70's Joan Baez riffs, chats and sings beautiful live music at a political rally for No on Prop 14.
Simon and Garfunkel sing Scarborough Fair at 1970 Amsterdam Concert Simon and Garfunkel sing Scarborough Fair at 1970 Amsterdam Concert. This song was written for The Graduate movie with Dustin Hoffman.
Simon and Garfunkel Sing Mrs. Robinson Live This is clipped from the Simon & Garfunkel live show in Amsterdam in 1970... Mrs. Robinson, of course.
When he says he did LSD.. crazy When he says he did LSD.. crazy
May 11, 1941 – The Allies And The Latin-America Question – Past Daily Reference Room Even before America officially entered the War, there was deep concern that a possible invasion of the U.S. could come from either Alaska or Latin-America. Alaska because the Aleutian islands were the closest point and an invasion could be easily staged. South America by way of Axis sponsored overthrows of certain key Latin and South-American countries; countries who may have seemed ripe to be persuaded to abandon any alliances with the U.S. and instead align themselves with Berlin, Rome and Tokyo. Uruguay was already the scene of a certain amount of sympathy toward the Axis by supplying safe-harbor for the German Battleship Graf Spee, and German submarines were active near the Caribbean and off the Eastern coast of South America, sinking British supply ships at an increasing rate. A plot had already been uncovered laying plans for an overthrow of the Uruguay government, replacing it with a pro-Berlin one. So it was crucial that the U.S. shore up any diplomatic cracks with Latin-America to ensure the Western Hemisphere was solidly behind the Allied effort to defeat the Axis. This lecture, given by John I.B. McCullogh editor of the Foreign Policy Association’s Pan-American News tells of the debate going on, not only in Washington but in the Capitols of Latin-American countries over the possibilities of forming an alliance; one of mutual aid and security with the Allies. A proposal was made at the conference in Havana in July of 1940, but the events taking place between July 1940 and May of 1941 were dramatically altering the direction which the war was taking and the issue of how Latin America was feeling about the War in Europe and was there in fact solidarity among the South American countries. That was the big issue since the political makeup of Latin America was running the gamut from Democratic to Authoritarian. Like everything, it was a delicate maneuver hampered only by time and events. Here is that lecture, given on May 11, 1941 by the Foreign Policy Association in Washington D.C.
The Zemlinsky Quartet Plays Music Of Haydn, Dvorak, Suk And Zemlinsky – 2011 – Past Daily Mid-Week Concert The Zemlinsky String Quartet – in concert – Jagdsaal Schwetzingen – March 8, 2011 – SWRS-Radio/RNE Clasica –
April 22, 1970 - On Top Of Everything Else; Earth Day. Celebrating the first Earth Day and the state of the Ecology.
April 21, 1975 - Imminent Implosion In South Vietnam - Thieu Resigns - Saigon Surrounded. April 21, 1975 - Special Report on Situation In Vietnam - Gordon Skene Sound Collection
May 6, 1942 – Fall And Surrender Of Corregidor – Critical Situation In Madagascar – Tire And Gas Rationing Coming Up. May 6, 1942 – a dismal day for the Allies with news of the capitulation and surrender of Corregidor, a staunchly defended island and one of the last allied strongholds in the Philippines. Although Japanese attacks had steadily increased to the point it was almost impossible to mount a reasonable resistance, there was still flagging optimism that some last minute counter-attack would save the beleaguered fortress. It was finally announced that commanding General Wainright saw the situation as hopeless and surrendered to the Japanese invaders, along with some 7,000 defenders among them some 3,845 U.S. Army and Navy and Marine personnel. General Wainright opted to stay with the garrison and not escape. It was also reported that there was still stiff resistance by American troops on Mindanao Island. But that was only a matter of time. The surrender of Corregidor served as a bitter blow to the Allies in the South Pacific, but it also solidified opposition to the Japanese with a steady increase in Allied air activity and intensifying successes in the air war. The Soviet Press wrote that it would only be a matter of time before the Allies gained the upper hand in air strength in the Pacific. Small comfort, but comfort nonetheless. The Fall of Corregidor was serving as a rallying cry for many back home. Meanwhile, after the initial ease of the British invasion of Madagascar, Vichy French resistance to the invasion force was stiffening to the point the operation was going into the critical phase. Still, slow gains were being made by British forces. And hot on the heels of the success with Sugar rationing came news that Tires and Gas were next in line to be rationed. It was inevitable, but at least the notion of “whatever it takes” was front and center on Americans minds. And that’s just a small slice of what happened, this May 6, 1942 as reported by Alka-Seltzer’s News Of The World.
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The Great Radio Documentaries - "Who Killed Michael Farmer?" - Edward R. Murrow - 1958 Continuing our month of milestone Radio Documentaries, this one from CBS Radio narrated by the legendary Edward R. Murrow and produced by Unit 1, the radio documentary wing of CBS Radio in April of 1958.

In the 1950s, the problem of youthful violence had sky-rocketed to epidemic proportions. Gang violence and random killings among teenagers was a relatively new phenomenon. Many thought it had something to do with Rock n’ Roll, and the slowly eroding attitudes toward sex.

But there was concern we were slipping into a state of perpetual violence in America, brought largely on by increasing portrayals of murder, mayhem and gore on TV and movies – and everything down to Comic Books. Many pointed the finger at Media for the breakdown of traditional values of home life.

There was also the nearly constant looming fear of atomic annihilation and the Cold War, we were a nervous and agitated society and things were just falling apart.

Whatever the cause was, the effect was much nervous hand-wringing and plaintive cries of “where did we go wrong?” Something had to be done. Well . . . .

As a way of focusing on the problem, a number of hours of TV and Radio time were devoted to exploring the problem, in the hopes of some answer, some solution to a situation rapidly spiraling out of control.

One of those programs was a Documentary produced by the venerable CBS Radio News and narrated by the legendary Edward R. Murrow. The Documentary “Who Killed Michael Farmer?” was one of the best examples of looking at a problem raging all over the country. It originally aired on April 21, 1958. Whether it successfully changed anything probably wasn’t the intention, but bringing a disturbing and frustrating subject to the forefront was.

For the next hour, you get to explore the teenage gang murder of an innocent, and the repercussions it had throughout the community.

Still, in many ways relevant – even though the situations, people and causes are more complex now. The fact remains the same – people are murdered for no reason other than being in the wrong place at the wrong time, and the people responsible are disturbed – emotionally or socially challenged. And after the shock, grief and horror fade with time, things go back to the way they were before. It goes much-much deeper than laws – it will always be more than that.

When nothing changes – nothing changes.
Roget Albin and Claude Helffer Play The Music Of Debussy - 1955 - Past Daily Weekend Gramophone. Back to French Radio transcriptions again this week. This time featuring something familiar played by two highly regarded artists of the 1950s – Roger Albin, cello and Claude Helffer, piano.

They play the Debussy Sonata for Cello and Piano, as recorded in a radio session for ORTF in Paris, circa 1955.

A word or two about this Sonata from Meg Ryan of The Los Angeles Philharmonic:

Initially subtitled “Pierrot is angry at the moon,” the Sonata for Cello and Piano does have in it some of the modern-day commedia dell’arte sensibility – a raw, heart-on-the-sleeve, dark humor. The Cello Sonata is the most unrefined, emotionally exposed of the three sonatas – maybe even of all Debussy’s works. The opening movement lays out a singing theme in the cello, by turns churning up ecstatic outbursts and quiescent moans. The middle movement is almost jazz-like in its counterpoint among three voices – piano in a dual role of melodic partner with the cello and as plucky, bluesy accompaniment, bowed cello in its upper register sharing the melody with piano, and the cello’s lowest notes, played pizzicato in an elastic syncopation that takes on the role of an upright jazz bass. There is indeed a lunar quality about this movement: Time stops and starts, melodic and harmonic themes shift between sultry darkness and starlit dances. From the final quiet statement of the serenade spills an exultant duet between cello and piano. The cello’s opening ascending sequence introduces a dancing theme which is folded into the mix for the rondo-like re-examination of the work’s previous themes.

Both Albin and Helffer are popular in collectors circles – whether this particular performance has been reissued is anyone’s guess. I suspect not, as so much of this French Radio material hasn’t been issued in any form.

In any event – a fitting end to the weekend. Enjoy.
July 29, 1942 - Raids Resume Over Britain - Raids Over Egypt - Race Against Time On The Eastern Front. July 29, 1942 – News for this day was covering many fronts – all of them playing crucial roles in how the was being waged. News that British and American raids over Egypt and Libya and American raids on Germany shipping near Tobruk were scoring decisive victories in substantially slowing supplies to the German Army – the sinking of Cargo ships containing fuel for German tanks and trucks put a serious damper on Field Marshall Rommel’s plans and many felt this was a potential turning point for the war in the Middle East.

Over Britain, word that German bombers were resuming raids over London were promoting a morale boost among Londoners. Not the intended affect, but it only solidified Britain’s resolve to open a Second Front, with pressure increasing to strike Europe someplace, at the moment it didn’t matter where.

The news from the Eastern front was more dire than first thought. German troops were pressing on to Leningrad, but the Russians were offering stiff resistance and making some progress, but not enough to stem the tide, many observers felt. Aid to Russia was now considered a race against time, with every passing minute a crucial step in whether Russia would face defeat or not.

And news from the Pacific reported that Allied ground patrols were thwarting a potential attempt by the Japanese to invade Port Moresby and that they hit and forced back Japanese jungle patrols around Kokoda, 65 miles from Moresby. Though no details of the action were available at press time, reports indicated the Japanese patrols were “strong”, but went on to say there was no evidence to suggest those patrols were being reinforced.

And that’s a small slice of what happened, this July 29, 1942 as reported by NBC’s News Of The World.
July 26, 1994 - Whitewater Starts - Middle-East Glimmers - OJ and Knives. July 26, 1994 – Busy day on Capitol Hill and the rest of the world. With the House Banking Committee starting hearings into the Whitewater Affair and President Clinton’s alleged role in it. Hearings this day began regarding the Washington end of the affair and what President Clinton’s aides did to monitor the investigation of his Arkansas Real Estate dealings. The committee vowed to make the hearings thorough and complete. The Committee voted along party lines to exclude questions about the suicide of Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster and most vowed there would be no bombshell disclosures waiting in the wings. Kicking off the Whitewater hearings was White House Counsel Lloyd Cutler who conceded before the hearings began that mistakes were made, but he concluded that no mistakes were made between the White House and staffers even though it was acknowledged that too many discussions regarding Whitewater were going on between too many staffers over too many sensitive matters, matters that should have been dealt with only by the Counsellors Office.

Meanwhile, Washington was playing host to Israel’s Yitzhak Rabin and Jordan’s King Hussein who had just concluded negotiations and signing of a Peace Pact between the two countries. Rabin was expected to address Congress within a few days. The previous night, President Clinton hosted a State Dinner at the White House for Rabin and Hussein and toasted their courage. Peace talks were now taking place in Cairo between Israeli and Palestinian negotiators for a third round in autonomy talks. Peace was moving – slowly, but moving.

And OJ Simpson resigned from the Board of Directors of the company that imports and distributes Swiss Army Knives. A spokesman for the Connecticut based Forschner Group disclosed Simpson wrote the letter of resignation on July 13th from his jail cell, as he was awaiting trial in the murders of Nicole Brown-Simspon and Ronald Goldman. Simpson was re-elected to the Board just three days before the murders took place.

And that’s a little of what happened, this July 26th 1994 as presented by The CBS World News Roundup.
July 26, 1994 - Whitewater Starts - Middle-East Glimmers - OJ and Knives. July 26, 1994 – Busy day on Capitol Hill and the rest of the world. With the House Banking Committee starting hearings into the Whitewater Affair and President Clinton’s alleged role in it. Hearings this day began regarding the Washington end of the affair and what President Clinton’s aides did to monitor the investigation of his Arkansas Real Estate dealings. The committee vowed to make the hearings thorough and complete. The Committee voted along party lines to exclude questions about the suicide of Deputy Counsel Vincent Foster and most vowed there would be no bombshell disclosures waiting in the wings. Kicking off the Whitewater hearings was White House Counsel Lloyd Cutler who conceded before the hearings began that mistakes were made, but he concluded that no mistakes were made between the White House and staffers even though it was acknowledged that too many discussions regarding Whitewater were going on between too many staffers over too many sensitive matters, matters that should have been dealt with only by the Counsellors Office.

Meanwhile, Washington was playing host to Israel’s Yitzhak Rabin and Jordan’s King Hussein who had just concluded negotiations and signing of a Peace Pact between the two countries. Rabin was expected to address Congress within a few days. The previous night, President Clinton hosted a State Dinner at the White House for Rabin and Hussein and toasted their courage. Peace talks were now taking place in Cairo between Israeli and Palestinian negotiators for a third round in autonomy talks. Peace was moving – slowly, but moving.

And OJ Simpson resigned from the Board of Directors of the company that imports and distributes Swiss Army Knives. A spokesman for the Connecticut based Forschner Group disclosed Simpson wrote the letter of resignation on July 13th from his jail cell, as he was awaiting trial in the murders of Nicole Brown-Simspon and Ronald Goldman. Simpson was re-elected to the Board just three days before the murders took place.

And that’s a little of what happened, this July 26th 1994 as presented by The CBS World News Roundup.
1950s - When The West Coast Was Cultural Mecca And L.A. Was It's Epicenter - Past Daily Reference Room. Hard to imagine now (although there are still pockets here and there), but right before World War 2 and well into the 1950s, Los Angeles, and the entire West Coast, was considered something of a Mecca for the Arts. The growth of the Film Industry on the West Coast, coupled with the tide of Nazism that swept over Europe in the early 1930s, made L.A. something of a gathering spot for the ex-pats and refugees – with some of the brightest and most forward thinking taking up residence everywhere from Malibu to The Hollywood Hills. Writers, Artists, Musicians, Composers – everyone who looked and saw the world from different eyes seemed to gravitate West.

But it also attracted a large group of figures from the mid-west and East Coast. Not refugees so much as escapees from blasts of arctic weather during the winter months and the sometimes claustrophobic confines of major metropolitan centers which the West coast, by comparison, was devoid of.

In this quarter hour discussion program, produced by KNX for the CBS Radio Network in 1958, journalist and commentator Bill Keneally interviews Lawrence Lipton, himself an early inhabitant of the West Coast via his native Poland, over this latest fascination for settling on the West Coast and the cultural climate of Los Angeles during that time and how it was paralleling the Beat Generation Movement that was capturing headlines and imaginations during the 1950s – echoing the sentiment that The West Coast was in the midst of being Mecca all over again.

Although some would vehemently disagree that The Beat Generation bore no resemblance to the Generation before who changed the landscape of film, art and writing – it nonetheless proved the point that Los Angeles was the place to be no matter when and the Beat Generation would have its time in the sun, sooner rather than later.

Here is that interview between Bill Keneally and Lawrence Lipton from 1958 for the Background For Headlines program from KNX and CBS Radio.
Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy Talks About Civil Rights At The South - Past Daily Reference Room. When President Kennedy appointed his brother Robert to the position of Attorney General, it was not only a controversial move, it was during one of the most contentious and violent periods in our nation’s history up to that point. The Civil Rights movement was at the forefront of the change sweeping America at the time. On the one hand you had charges of Nepotism and the appointment of a seemingly unqualified individual to a weighty position of responsibility, but you also had an Attorney General stepping into a virtual hornets nest of violence and confrontation; a situation capable of tearing the fragile fabric of Democracy to pieces.

Foremost, you had the School Desegregation issue, which was ground zero for a showdown between Alabama Governor George Wallace and the Federal Government in an effort to enforce a law that had been in place since the Eisenhower administration of the 1950s. You also had the Civil Rights movement, which was target for repeated acts of intimidation and violence by Whites opposed to the idea of integration in cities and neighborhoods throughout the South and those non-violent protestors who sought to implement that change. There had already been mass arrests of Civil Rights workers and the violent breakup of rallies and demonstrations – the bombings of predominantly Black Churches by the KKK, the killings of Civil Rights workers, some random and some targeted – the terror tactics employed by racist groups intent on stifling voting in Black neighborhoods.

Robert Kennedy was handed no easy tasks to perform – but did not shirk responsibility. On this episode of the NBC program Meet The Press, Kennedy talks about the then-current climate in the South, the large scale efforts to enforce Federal law and to bring those individuals and groups to justice in order to ensure the violence and intimidation came to a halt.

Here is that program.
Ghum - in session - 2022 - Past Daily Soundbooth Ghum to start the week. A session from London Post-Punk conglomerate Ghum, in session for John Kennedy at Radio X on July 16th of this year.

According to Last.FM:

Ghum are an atmospheric dark pop four-piece based in London, UK. Fusing together post-punk and goth, with a hint of grunge, the band draw inspiration from love, loss and inner demons.

After pursuing musical projects in Brazil, Spain, Brighton and the London DIY scene, Marina MJ, Laura Guerrero Lora, Jojo Khor and Vicki Butler were brought together by a mutual love of The Cure, Warpaint and PJ Harvey after Marina posted an online ad on Gumtree looking to start a band.

After playing their first show in 2016, Ghum have since built up an impressive live reputation; supporting bands such as Dream Wife, L.A. Witch, The Underground Youth and more since their debut.

The band released their debut self-titled EP in 2017, which combined haunting vocals reminiscent of PJ Harvey, smokey veil of haunting new wave guitars, driving bass lines and calculative drums. Ghum’s hazy video for their track, ‘TV’, was premiered by DIY magazine earlier that year followed by shows across the UK and Europe.”

“Morphing atmospheric pop through a smokey haunting new wave guitar” – Hard of Hearing Music.

Their second ep, The Coldest Fire was released in 2019, backed with a UK tour in July 2019. The EP came to national media attention, with the band doing a BBC Introducing session and lead track “Saturn” being play listed by BBC Radio 6 Music. The band’s follow-up single “California”, released January 2020, was debuted on the Steve Lamacq show on BBC Radio 6 Music and featured on his 6 Music Recommends playlist. The song was named one of the ’20 best rock songs right now’ by The Fader.

Bands GHUM have played with include Dream Wife and L.A. Witch. After seeing them, Alice Go of Dream Wife contributed a remix of their 2018 single “I’m the Storm”.

On 29 March 2022 the band announced their debut album Bitter, and was released on 17 June 2022.

Crank it up and have a listen.
Ghum - in session - 2022 - Past Daily Soundbooth Ghum to start the week. A session from London Post-Punk conglomerate Ghum, in session for John Kennedy at Radio X on July 16th of this year.

According to Last.FM:

Ghum are an atmospheric dark pop four-piece based in London, UK. Fusing together post-punk and goth, with a hint of grunge, the band draw inspiration from love, loss and inner demons.

After pursuing musical projects in Brazil, Spain, Brighton and the London DIY scene, Marina MJ, Laura Guerrero Lora, Jojo Khor and Vicki Butler were brought together by a mutual love of The Cure, Warpaint and PJ Harvey after Marina posted an online ad on Gumtree looking to start a band.

After playing their first show in 2016, Ghum have since built up an impressive live reputation; supporting bands such as Dream Wife, L.A. Witch, The Underground Youth and more since their debut.

The band released their debut self-titled EP in 2017, which combined haunting vocals reminiscent of PJ Harvey, smokey veil of haunting new wave guitars, driving bass lines and calculative drums. Ghum’s hazy video for their track, ‘TV’, was premiered by DIY magazine earlier that year followed by shows across the UK and Europe.”

“Morphing atmospheric pop through a smokey haunting new wave guitar” – Hard of Hearing Music.

Their second ep, The Coldest Fire was released in 2019, backed with a UK tour in July 2019. The EP came to national media attention, with the band doing a BBC Introducing session and lead track “Saturn” being play listed by BBC Radio 6 Music. The band’s follow-up single “California”, released January 2020, was debuted on the Steve Lamacq show on BBC Radio 6 Music and featured on his 6 Music Recommends playlist. The song was named one of the ’20 best rock songs right now’ by The Fader.

Bands GHUM have played with include Dream Wife and L.A. Witch. After seeing them, Alice Go of Dream Wife contributed a remix of their 2018 single “I’m the Storm”.

On 29 March 2022 the band announced their debut album Bitter, and was released on 17 June 2022.

Crank it up and have a listen.
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