Group 4 Created with Sketch.

Science Magazine Podcast

Play All
20848 Listens
92 Subscribers
Share Path Report
rss rss .
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary. Continue Reading >>
Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary. << Show Less
Featured Audio
Invasive grasses get help from fire, and a global map of ant diversity On this week’s show: A special issue on grass, and revealing hot spots of ant diversity
This week’s special issue on grasses mainly focuses on the importance of these plants in climate change, in ecosystems, on land, and in the water. But for the podcast, Contributing Correspondent Warren Cornwall joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about their dark side: invasive grasses that feed fires and transform ecosystems.
Also this week on the show, Evan Economo, a professor in the biodiversity and biocomplexity unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, joins Sarah to discuss his Science Advances paper on creating a worldwide map of ant diversity. Such maps help us better understand where vertebrate and invertebrate diversity do and don’t overlap and what this means for conservation. If you want to explore the data, you can see them at antmaps.org. 
This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
[Image: NTPFES; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
[alt: grassland fire in Northern Australia with podcast symbol overlay]
Authors: Sarah Crespi; Warren Cornwall  
Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.ade2512
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Newest Audio
Invasive grasses get help from fire, and a global map of ant diversity On this week’s show: A special issue on grass, and revealing hot spots of ant diversity
This week’s special issue on grasses mainly focuses on the importance of these plants in climate change, in ecosystems, on land, and in the water. But for the podcast, Contributing Correspondent Warren Cornwall joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about their dark side: invasive grasses that feed fires and transform ecosystems.
Also this week on the show, Evan Economo, a professor in the biodiversity and biocomplexity unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, joins Sarah to discuss his Science Advances paper on creating a worldwide map of ant diversity. Such maps help us better understand where vertebrate and invertebrate diversity do and don’t overlap and what this means for conservation. If you want to explore the data, you can see them at antmaps.org. 
This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
[Image: NTPFES; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
[alt: grassland fire in Northern Australia with podcast symbol overlay]
Authors: Sarah Crespi; Warren Cornwall  
Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.ade2512
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Probing beyond our Solar System, sea pollinators, and a book on the future of nutrition On this week’s show: Plans to push a modern space probe beyond the edge of the Solar System, crustaceans that pollinate seaweed, and the latest in our series of author interviews on food, science, and nutrition
After visiting the outer planets in the 1980s, the twin Voyager spacecraft have sent back tantalizing clues about the edge of our Solar System and what lies beyond. Though they may have reached the edge of the Solar System or even passed it, the craft lack the instruments to tell us much about the interstellar medium—the space between the stars. Intern Khafia Choudhary talks with Contributing Correspondent Richard Stone about plans to send a modern space probe outside the Solar System and what could be learned from such a mission.
Next up on the show, Myriam Valero, a population geneticist at the evolutionary biology and ecology of algae research department at Sorbonne University, talks with host Sarah Crespi about how a little crustacean might help fertilize a species of algae. If the seaweed in the study does use a marine pollinator, it suggests there may have been a much earlier evolutionary start for pollination partnerships.
Finally, we have the next in our series on books exploring the science of food and agriculture. This month, host Angela Saini talks with biochemist T. Colin Campbell about his book The Future of Nutrition: An Insider’s Look at the Science, Why We Keep Getting It Wrong, and How to Start Getting It Right.
 
This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
 
[Image: Johns Hopkins APL/Mike Yakovlev; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
 
[alt: illustration of an interstellar probe crossing the boundary of the heliosphere with podcast symbol overlay]
 
Authors: Sarah Crespi; Rich Stone; Angela Saini; Khafia Choudhary
 
++
LINKS FOR MP3 META
 
Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.ade1292  
 
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcastSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Possible fabrications in Alzheimer’s research, and bad news for life on Enceladus On this week’s show: Troubling signs of fraud threaten discoveries key to a reigning theory of Alzheimer’s disease, and calculating the saltiness of the ocean on one of Saturn’s moons
Investigative journalist Charles Piller joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss signs of fabrication in scores of Alzheimer’s articles brought to light by a neuroscientist whistleblower.
Next, researcher Wan Ying Kang talks with Sarah about Saturn’s bizarre moon Enceladus. Kang’s group wrote in Science Advances about modeling the salinity of the global ocean tucked between the moon’s icy shell and solid core. Their findings spell bad news for potential habitability on Enceladus.
This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
[Image: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
[alt: Enceladus as viewed from Cassini with podcast symbol overlay]
Authors: Sarah Crespi; Charles Piller
Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.ade0384
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcastSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
The Webb Space Telescope’s first images, and why scratching sometimes makes you itchy On this week’s show: The first images from the James Webb Space Telescope hint at the science to come, and disentangling the itch-scratch cycle
After years of delays, the James Webb Space Telescope launched at the end of December 2021. Now, NASA has released a few of the first full-color images captured by the instrument’s enormous mirror. Staff Writer Daniel Clery joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss these first images and what they mean for the future of science from Webb.
Next on the podcast, Jing Feng, principal investigator at the Center for Neurological and Psychiatric Research and Drug Discovery at the Chinese Academy of Sciences’s Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, discusses his Science Translational Medicine paper on why scratching sometimes triggers itching. It turns out, in cases of chronic itch there can be a miswiring in the skin. Cells that normally detect light touch instead connect with nerve fibers that convey a sensation of itchiness. This miswiring means light touches (such as scratching) are felt as itchiness—contributing to a vicious itch-scratch cycle.
Also this week, in a sponsored segment from Science and the AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders, director and senior editor for the Custom Publishing Office, interviews Paul Bastard, chief resident in the department of pediatrics at the Necker Hospital for Sick Children in Paris and a researcher at the Imagine Institute in Paris and Rockefeller University. They talk about his work to shed light on susceptibility to COVID-19, which recently won him the Michelson Philanthropies & Science Prize for Immunology. This segment is sponsored by Michelson Philanthropies.
This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
[Image: NASA; ESA; CSA; STSCI; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
[alt: James Webb Space Telescope image of image of galaxy cluster SMACS 0723 with podcast symbol overlay]
Authors: Sarah Crespi; Daniel Clery
Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add9123
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcastSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Running out of fuel for fusion, and addressing gender-based violence in India On this week’s show: A shortage of tritium fuel may leave fusion energy with an empty tank, and an attempt to improve police responsiveness to violence against women
First up this week on the podcast, Staff Writer Daniel Clery talks with host Sarah Crespi about a new hurdle for fusion: not enough fuel. After decades of delays, scientists are almost ready to turn on the first fusion reactor that makes more energy than it uses, but the fast-decaying fuel needed to run the reactor is running out.
Also this week, we highlight an intervention aimed at increasing police responsiveness to gender-based violence in India. Sandip Sukhtankar, an economist at the University of Virginia, talks about creating dedicated spaces for women in local police stations, staffed by trained officers. The presence of these “help desks”—when staffed by women officers—increased the recording by police of crimes against women, opening up access to social services and possibly a path to justice.
This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
[Image: DAVID PARKER/SCIENCE SOURCE; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
[alt: The interior of the ITER fusion megareactor (artist’s concept) with podcast overlay]
Authors: Sarah Crespi; Daniel Clery
Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add8229 
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Former pirates help study the seas, and waves in the atmosphere can drive global tsunamis On this week’s show: A boost in research ships from an unlikely source, and how the 2022 Tonga eruption shook earth, water, and air around the world
For decades, the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society caused controversy on the high seas; now it’s turning its patrolling ships into research vessels. Online News Editor David Grimm discusses how this change of heart came about with host Sarah Crespi.
Also this week, how atmospheric waves can push tsunamis around the globe. Producer Meagan Cantwell talks with Emily Brodsky, an earthquake physicist at University of California, Santa Cruz, about data from a multitude of sensors showing how waves in the air drove the fast-moving tsunamis that raced around the planet after the January Hunga eruption in Tonga.
Read the related papers:

Global fast-traveling tsunamis driven by atmospheric Lamb waves on the 2022 Tonga eruption
Atmospheric waves and global seismoacoustic observations of the January 2022 Hunga eruption, Tonga

This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
[Image: NASA Earth Observatory; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
[alt: Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha‘apai eruption as seen from space with podcast overlay]
Authors: Sarah Crespi; Meagan Cantwell; David Grimm
Episode page: https://www.science.org/content/podcast/former-pirates-help-study-seas-and-waves-atmosphere-can-drive-global-tsunamis
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast 
 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Using waste to fuel airplanes, nature-based climate solutions, and a book on Indigenous conservation On this week’s show: Whether biofuels for planes will become a reality, mitigating climate change by working with nature, and the second installment of our book series on the science of food and agriculture
First this week, Science Staff Writer Robert F. Service talks with producer Meagan Cantwell about sustainable aviation fuel, a story included in Science’s special issue on climate change. Researchers have been able to develop this green gas from materials such as municipal garbage and corn stalks. Will it power air travel in the future?
Also in the special issue this week, Nathalie Seddon, a professor of biodiversity at the University of Oxford, chats with host Sarah Crespi about the value of working with nature to support the biodiversity and resilience of our ecosystems. Seddon emphasizes that nature-based solutions alone cannot stop climate change—technological approaches and behavioral changes will also need to be implemented.
Finally, we have the second installment of our series of author interviews on the science of food and agriculture. Host and science journalist Angela Saini talks to Jessica Hernandez, an Indigenous environmental scientist and author of Fresh Banana Leaves: Healing Indigenous Landscapes Through Indigenous Science. Hernandez’s book explores the failures of Western conservationism—and what we can learn about land management from Indigenous people.
This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
[Image: USDA NCRS Texas; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
[alt: cows in a forest]
Authors: Meagan Cantwell; Robert Service, Sarah Crespi, Angela Saini
Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add6320
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcastSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
A look at Long Covid, and why researchers and police shouldn’t use the same DNA kits On this week&rsquo;s show: Tracing the roots of Long Covid, and an argument against using the same DNA markers for suspects in law enforcement and in research labs for cell lines
Two years into the pandemic, we&rsquo;re still uncertain about the impact of Long Covid on the world&mdash;and up to 20% of COVID-19 patients might be at risk. First on the podcast this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to share a snapshot of the current state of Long Covid research, particularly what researchers think are likely causes.
Also this week, Debra Mathews, assistant director for science programs in the Berman Institute of Bioethics and associate professor of genetic medicine at Johns Hopkins University, talks with Sarah about why everyone using the same DNA kits&mdash;from FBI to Interpol to research labs&mdash;is a bad idea.
Finally, in a sponsored segment from the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders, director and senior editor for custom publishing, interviews Bobby Soni, chief business officer at the BioInnovation Institute (BII), about what steps scientists can take to successfully commercialize their ideas. This segment is sponsored by BII.
This week&rsquo;s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
[Image: A. Mastin/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
[alt: illustration of potential causes for Long Covid ]
Authors: Sarah Crespi; Jennifer Couzin-Frankel
Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add4887
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Saving the Spix’s macaw, and protecting the energy grid Two decades after it disappeared in nature, the stunning blue Spix&rsquo;s macaw will be reintroduced to its forest home, and lessons learned from Texas&rsquo;s major power crisis in 2021
The Spix&rsquo;s macaw was first described in scientific literature in 1819&mdash;200 years later it was basically poached to extinction in the wild. Now, collectors and conservationists are working together to reintroduce captive-bred birds into their natural habitat in northeastern Brazil. Contributing Correspondent Kai Kupferschmidt discusses the recovery of this highly coveted and endangered parrot with host Sarah Crespi.
Also this week, in an interview from the AAAS annual meeting, Meagan Cantwell talks with Varun Rai, Walt and Elspth Rostow professor in the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, Austin, about how to prepare energy grids to weather extreme events and climate change.
This week&rsquo;s episode was produced with help from Podigy.
[Image: PATRICK PLEUL/PICTURE ALLIANCE VIA GETTY IMAGES; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
[alt: two blue Spix&rsquo;s macaws with podcast symbol overlay]
Authors: Sarah Crespi; Kai Kupferschmidt; Meagan Cantwell
Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add3733
About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast
See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.
Load More Audio