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‎The Common Good And An Uncommon Conversation

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Health and Wellness, History, Community Service, Literature, Creative arts, Medicine, Acupuncture and much more… yes even the Circus is within the interview library.
Health and Wellness, History, Community Service, Literature, Creative arts, Medicine, Acupuncture and much more… yes even the Circus is within the interview library. << Show Less
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Entrepreneur, Entertainer: civic leader, circus KATHY MAHER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, THE BARNUM MUSEUM. The Barnum Museum in downtown Bridgeport, Connecticut is the last surviving building attributed to the American visionary entrepreneur and entertainer Phineas Taylor Barnum (1810-1891).With more than 30 years in the museum world, Kathleen Maher is a gifted speaker and noted authority on all things related to Phineas Taylor Barnum. Kathy joined the Barnum Museum in 1998 and has been Executive Director since 2005.In 2010, the Barnum Museum was struck by an EF1 tornado significantly damaging the historic landmark building, with additional damage sustained from hurricanes Irene and Sandy. In the wake of this tremendous challenge Kathy has been the Museum’s champion, leading the charge to restore and re-envision the historic structure. Under her leadership, the Museum is focusing on new and innovative methods, integrating history, arts, science and technology to create a dynamic 21st century Museum for the future.Ms. Maher is an active member of the Connecticut cultural community, and an advocate for the city of Bridgeport’s historic and cultural legacy. She holds governor’s appointments to the Connecticut State Historic Preservation Council, the State Library and Museum of Connecticut History and Heritage, and the Connecticut Civil War Commemoration Commission. She advocates and speaks across the U.S. about historic preservation, urban revitalization and economic development through community arts and cultural heritage, and has been featured by major media properties including the History Channel, A&E Networks, Connecticut Public Television, TEDx, the BBC and National Public Radio. She holds a M.A. from New York University and has worked at cultural institutions including the Metropolitan Museum of Art.Kathy is regularly sought and acknowledged by local and global media outlets for her expertise and her enthusiasm to share P.T. Barnum’s story with the world.https://barnum-museum.org/https://www.barnummuseumexhibitions.org/P.T. Barnum, in full Phineas Taylor Barnum, (born July 5, 1810, Bethel, Connecticut, U.S.—died April 7, 1891, Bridgeport, Connecticut), American showman who employed sensational forms of presentation and publicity to popularize such amusements as the public museum, the musical concert, and the three-ring circus. In partnership with James A. Bailey, he made the American circus a popular and gigantic spectacle, the so-called Greatest Show on Earth.Barnum was 15 years old when his father died, and the support of his mother and his five sisters and brothers fell largely upon his shoulders. After holding a variety of jobs, he became publisher of a Danbury, Connecticut, weekly newspaper, Herald of Freedom. Arrested three times for libel, he enjoyed his first taste of notoriety.In 1829, at age 19, Barnum married a 21-year-old Bethel woman, Charity Hallett, who was to bear him four daughters. https://www.britannica.com/biography/P-T-BarnumSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/MinerPatrick/checkout?ru=undefined)
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PT BARNUM KATHY MAHER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, THE BARNUM MUSEUM. The Barnum Museum in downtown Bridgeport, Connecticut is the last surviving building attributed to the American visionary entrepreneur and entertainer Phineas Taylor Barnum (1810-1891).With more than 30 years in the museum world, Kathleen Maher is a gifted speaker and noted authority on all things related to Phineas Taylor Barnum. Kathy joined the Barnum Museum in 1998 and has been Executive Director since 2005.In 2010, the Barnum Museum was struck by an EF1 tornado significantly damaging the historic landmark building, with additional damage sustained from hurricanes Irene and Sandy. In the wake of this tremendous challenge Kathy has been the Museum’s champion, leading the charge to restore and re-envision the historic structure. Under her leadership, the Museum is focusing on new and innovative methods, integrating history, arts, science and technology to create a dynamic 21st century Museum for the future.Ms. Maher is an active member of the Connecticut cultural community, and an advocate for the city of Bridgeport’s historic and cultural legacy. She holds governor’s appointments to the Connecticut State Historic Preservation Council, the State Library and Museum of Connecticut History and Heritage, and the Connecticut Civil War Commemoration Commission. She advocates and speaks across the U.S. about historic preservation, urban revitalization and economic development through community arts and cultural heritage, and has been featured by major media properties including the History Channel, A&E Networks, Connecticut Public Television, TEDx, the BBC and National Public Radio. She holds a M.A. from New York University and has worked at cultural institutions including the Metropolitan Museum of Art.Kathy is regularly sought and acknowledged by local and global media outlets for her expertise and her enthusiasm to share P.T. Barnum’s story with the world.https://barnum-museum.org/https://www.barnummuseumexhibitions.org/P.T. Barnum, in full Phineas Taylor Barnum, (born July 5, 1810, Bethel, Connecticut, U.S.—died April 7, 1891, Bridgeport, Connecticut), American showman who employed sensational forms of presentation and publicity to popularize such amusements as the public museum, the musical concert, and the three-ring circus. In partnership with James A. Bailey, he made the American circus a popular and gigantic spectacle, the so-called Greatest Show on Earth.Barnum was 15 years old when his father died, and the support of his mother and his five sisters and brothers fell largely upon his shoulders. After holding a variety of jobs, he became publisher of a Danbury, Connecticut, weekly newspaper, Herald of Freedom. Arrested three times for libel, he enjoyed his first taste of notoriety.In 1829, at age 19, Barnum married a 21-year-old Bethel woman, Charity Hallett, who was to bear him four daughters. https://www.britannica.com/biography/P-T-BarnumSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/MinerPatrick/checkout?ru=undefined)
Entrepreneur, Entertainer: civic leader, circus KATHY MAHER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, THE BARNUM MUSEUM. The Barnum Museum in downtown Bridgeport, Connecticut is the last surviving building attributed to the American visionary entrepreneur and entertainer Phineas Taylor Barnum (1810-1891).With more than 30 years in the museum world, Kathleen Maher is a gifted speaker and noted authority on all things related to Phineas Taylor Barnum. Kathy joined the Barnum Museum in 1998 and has been Executive Director since 2005.In 2010, the Barnum Museum was struck by an EF1 tornado significantly damaging the historic landmark building, with additional damage sustained from hurricanes Irene and Sandy. In the wake of this tremendous challenge Kathy has been the Museum’s champion, leading the charge to restore and re-envision the historic structure. Under her leadership, the Museum is focusing on new and innovative methods, integrating history, arts, science and technology to create a dynamic 21st century Museum for the future.Ms. Maher is an active member of the Connecticut cultural community, and an advocate for the city of Bridgeport’s historic and cultural legacy. She holds governor’s appointments to the Connecticut State Historic Preservation Council, the State Library and Museum of Connecticut History and Heritage, and the Connecticut Civil War Commemoration Commission. She advocates and speaks across the U.S. about historic preservation, urban revitalization and economic development through community arts and cultural heritage, and has been featured by major media properties including the History Channel, A&E Networks, Connecticut Public Television, TEDx, the BBC and National Public Radio. She holds a M.A. from New York University and has worked at cultural institutions including the Metropolitan Museum of Art.Kathy is regularly sought and acknowledged by local and global media outlets for her expertise and her enthusiasm to share P.T. Barnum’s story with the world.https://barnum-museum.org/https://www.barnummuseumexhibitions.org/P.T. Barnum, in full Phineas Taylor Barnum, (born July 5, 1810, Bethel, Connecticut, U.S.—died April 7, 1891, Bridgeport, Connecticut), American showman who employed sensational forms of presentation and publicity to popularize such amusements as the public museum, the musical concert, and the three-ring circus. In partnership with James A. Bailey, he made the American circus a popular and gigantic spectacle, the so-called Greatest Show on Earth.Barnum was 15 years old when his father died, and the support of his mother and his five sisters and brothers fell largely upon his shoulders. After holding a variety of jobs, he became publisher of a Danbury, Connecticut, weekly newspaper, Herald of Freedom. Arrested three times for libel, he enjoyed his first taste of notoriety.In 1829, at age 19, Barnum married a 21-year-old Bethel woman, Charity Hallett, who was to bear him four daughters. https://www.britannica.com/biography/P-T-BarnumSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/MinerPatrick/checkout?ru=undefined)
Genocide makes a canal ERIE CANAL MUSEUM318 Erie Boulevard EastSyracuse, New York 3202315-471-0593Guest:    ERIC PRATT      Museum EducatorThere&apos;s no Place Like Home:  Syracuse&apos;s Weighlock Building Built between 1817 and 1825, the original Erie Canal traversed 363 miles from Albany to Buffalo. It was the longest artificial waterway and the greatest public works project in North America. The canal put New York on the map as the Empire State—the leader in population, industry, and economic strength.Length | 363 miles (584 km)Locks | 36[1][self-published source?]Maximum height above sea level | 571 ft (174 m)Status | OpenNavigation authority | New York State Canal CorporationHistoryOriginal owner | New York StatePrincipal engineer | Benjamin WrightConstruction began | July 4, 1817 (at Rome, New York)Date of first use | May 17, 1821Date completed | October 26, 1825Date restored | September 3, 1999GeographyStart point | Hudson River near Albany, New York(42.7834°N 73.6767°W)End point | Niagara River near Buffalo, New York(43.0237°N 78.8901°W)Branch(es) | Oswego Canal, Cayuga–Seneca CanalBranch of | New York State Canal SystemConnects to | Champlain Canal, Welland CanalSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/MinerPatrick/checkout?ru=undefined)
ERIE CANAL ERIE CANAL MUSEUM318 Erie Boulevard EastSyracuse, New York 3202315-471-0593Guest:    ERIC PRATT      Museum EducatorThere&apos;s no Place Like Home:  Syracuse&apos;s Weighlock Building Built between 1817 and 1825, the original Erie Canal traversed 363 miles from Albany to Buffalo. It was the longest artificial waterway and the greatest public works project in North America. The canal put New York on the map as the Empire State—the leader in population, industry, and economic strength.Length | 363 miles (584 km)Locks | 36[1][self-published source?]Maximum height above sea level | 571 ft (174 m)Status | OpenNavigation authority | New York State Canal CorporationHistoryOriginal owner | New York StatePrincipal engineer | Benjamin WrightConstruction began | July 4, 1817 (at Rome, New York)Date of first use | May 17, 1821Date completed | October 26, 1825Date restored | September 3, 1999GeographyStart point | Hudson River near Albany, New York(42.7834°N 73.6767°W)End point | Niagara River near Buffalo, New York(43.0237°N 78.8901°W)Branch(es) | Oswego Canal, Cayuga–Seneca CanalBranch of | New York State Canal SystemConnects to | Champlain Canal, Welland CanalSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/MinerPatrick/checkout?ru=undefined)
Ship wrecks and their cold, dark graves! The Great Lakes hold over 80 percent of the United States’ freshwater.The Guest is qualified in every way to discuss Lake Michigan ship wrecks.Her enthusiasm makes Cathy Green a dedicated steward of maritime history. A nautical archeologist she is, but in this episode you will meet a professional diver and executive the Maritime Museum, Manitowoc,  Wisconsin.Now, 962 square miles of Wisconsin’s Lake Michigan have become protected waters — and not for the reason you might think.Although the lake provides a habitat for a diverse group of plants, fish, amphibians and other animals, it is also home to a precious archaeological trove. The waters along the Wisconsin coast are a shipwreck graveyard containing 36 known vessels, and researchers say there could be nearly 60 others still to be discovered. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has designated the area the Wisconsin Shipwreck Coast National Marine Sanctuary, citing shipwrecks of “exceptional historical, archaeological and recreational value.”The ships got there over the course of hundreds of years of travel and commerce along the lakes, and Lake Michigan’s chilly, fresh waters acted as the perfect preservative. While salty waters can decay sunken ship parts and corrode metal, fresh water doesn’t. The very water that brought hundreds of ships to ruin in Lake Michigan served to preserve them for future generations to study. Many of the ships that wrecked along the state’s coast look much like they did the day they sank.(Washington Post)https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/news/press/wisconsin/
Take a look…shipwrecks, aircraft in Lake Michigan The Great Lakes hold over 80 percent of the United States’ freshwater.The Guest is qualified in every way to discuss Lake Michigan ship wrecks.Her enthusiasm makes Cathy Green a dedicated steward of maritime history. A nautical archeologist she is, but in this episode you will meet a professional diver and executive the Maritime Museum, Manitowoc,  Wisconsin.Now, 962 square miles of Wisconsin’s Lake Michigan have become protected waters — and not for the reason you might think.Although the lake provides a habitat for a diverse group of plants, fish, amphibians and other animals, it is also home to a precious archaeological trove. The waters along the Wisconsin coast are a shipwreck graveyard containing 36 known vessels, and researchers say there could be nearly 60 others still to be discovered. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has designated the area the Wisconsin Shipwreck Coast National Marine Sanctuary, citing shipwrecks of “exceptional historical, archaeological and recreational value.”The ships got there over the course of hundreds of years of travel and commerce along the lakes, and Lake Michigan’s chilly, fresh waters acted as the perfect preservative. While salty waters can decay sunken ship parts and corrode metal, fresh water doesn’t. The very water that brought hundreds of ships to ruin in Lake Michigan served to preserve them for future generations to study. Many of the ships that wrecked along the state’s coast look much like they did the day they sank.(Washington Post)https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/news/press/wisconsin/
graveyard for thousands of people, hundreds of ships, dozens of aircraft and one submarine The Great Lakes hold over 80 percent of the United States’ freshwater.The Guest is qualified in every way to discuss Lake Michigan ship wrecks.Her enthusiasm makes Cathy Green a dedicated steward of maritime history. A nautical archeologist she is, but in this episode you will meet a professional diver and executive the Maritime Museum, Manitowoc,  Wisconsin.Now, 962 square miles of Wisconsin’s Lake Michigan have become protected waters — and not for the reason you might think.Although the lake provides a habitat for a diverse group of plants, fish, amphibians and other animals, it is also home to a precious archaeological trove. The waters along the Wisconsin coast are a shipwreck graveyard containing 36 known vessels, and researchers say there could be nearly 60 others still to be discovered. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has designated the area the Wisconsin Shipwreck Coast National Marine Sanctuary, citing shipwrecks of “exceptional historical, archaeological and recreational value.”The ships got there over the course of hundreds of years of travel and commerce along the lakes, and Lake Michigan’s chilly, fresh waters acted as the perfect preservative. While salty waters can decay sunken ship parts and corrode metal, fresh water doesn’t. The very water that brought hundreds of ships to ruin in Lake Michigan served to preserve them for future generations to study. Many of the ships that wrecked along the state’s coast look much like they did the day they sank.(Washington Post)https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/news/press/wisconsin/
Ship wrecks are storytellers The Great Lakes hold over 80 percent of the United States’ freshwater.The Guest is qualified in every way to discuss Lake Michigan ship wrecks.Her enthusiasm makes Cathy Green a dedicated steward of maritime history. A nautical archeologist she is, but in this episode you will meet a professional diver and executive the Maritime Museum, Manitowoc,  Wisconsin.Now, 962 square miles of Wisconsin’s Lake Michigan have become protected waters — and not for the reason you might think.Although the lake provides a habitat for a diverse group of plants, fish, amphibians and other animals, it is also home to a precious archaeological trove. The waters along the Wisconsin coast are a shipwreck graveyard containing 36 known vessels, and researchers say there could be nearly 60 others still to be discovered. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has designated the area the Wisconsin Shipwreck Coast National Marine Sanctuary, citing shipwrecks of “exceptional historical, archaeological and recreational value.”The ships got there over the course of hundreds of years of travel and commerce along the lakes, and Lake Michigan’s chilly, fresh waters acted as the perfect preservative. While salty waters can decay sunken ship parts and corrode metal, fresh water doesn’t. The very water that brought hundreds of ships to ruin in Lake Michigan served to preserve them for future generations to study. Many of the ships that wrecked along the state’s coast look much like they did the day they sank.(Washington Post)https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/news/press/wisconsin/
A stolen jar of mustard and Supreme Court https:/https://youtu.be/CJHgPlRKW-Home to the World’s Largest Collectionof Mustards and Mustard MemorabiliaA mustard museum? ABSOLUTELY! According to Barry Levenson, founder & curator of the National Mustard Museum, you can blame it all on the Boston Red Sox. In the wee hours of October 28, 1986, after his favorite baseball team had just lost the World Series, Barry was wandering an all-night supermarket looking for the meaning of life. As he passed the mustards, he heard a voice: If you collect us, they will come.He did and they have. In 1992, Barry left his job as an Assistant Attorney General for the State of Wisconsin to open this most improbable museum, now one of Wisconsin’s most popular attractions. The Mustard Museum has been featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show, the popular game shows Jeopardy! and To Tell the Truth, as well as countless features on other national television and radio shows, and in major newspapers everywhere.So, why all the fuss? Well, with more than 6,090 mustards from all 50 states and more than 70 countries (and counting), our collection of Mustard History is a sight to behold. From the exquisite Gibbons Collection of mustard pots to antique tins & jars and vintage advertisements, the National Mustard Museum is truly a shining temple to the “King of Condiments”.Help us honor the King of Condiments. National Mustard Day is celebrated annually on the first Saturday in August. It is always a fun-filled, sun-splashed day for the whole family.Traditionally, our Mustard Day street festival features music, games and other entertainment, as well as hot dogs, brats, FREE mustard sampling, and more. The National Mustard Museum has been the official sponsor and host of this event since 1991At least that’s the word according to Professor Mustard, in the library, with the mustard jar. At POUPON U, we recognize the values of intellectual honesty, freedom of expression, and hard work. We don’t practice those values, but we do recognize them. Instead, we offer a stimulating learning environment where faculty and students engage in spontaneous food fights.Yes, the kooky coeds at America’s Mustard College are always feeling a little condimental. Which is why they are rarely seen without their official Poupon U gear. Hats, t-shirts, sweatshirts, pennants — all the traditional campus gifts as well as some not-so-traditional bookstore merchandise.POUPON U understands the importance of a quality collegiate football program, and that is why we don’t field a football team. But we do have two (yes, TWO) outstanding fight songs that will make your spirits soar.So give it the ol’ college try, Poupon U-style!https://mustardmuseum.com/s://mustardmuseum.com/video-preview-of-the-national-mustard-museum/
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