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Spawned from The Prepared's well-read manufacturing newsletter, The Prepared Podcast contains interviews with engineers, and entrepreneurs, and operators working in manufacturing. Continue Reading >>
Spawned from The Prepared's well-read manufacturing newsletter, The Prepared Podcast contains interviews with engineers, and entrepreneurs, and operators working in manufacturing. << Show Less
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GE Additive In this episode we visit GE’s Additive Technology Center and hear the history of GE Additive’s formation. Our guests include Greg Morris, Josh Mook, Amber Andreaco, Christine Furstoss, Chris Schuppe, and Eric Gatlin.This episode of The Prepared’s podcast is brought to you by GE Additive.Listen and subscribe on&nbsp;iTunes,&nbsp;Overcast,&nbsp;Google Play&nbsp;and&nbsp;Stitcher!



































Image courtesy GE Additive













Notes:Photos from GE’s Pittsburgh CEC.GE Additive’s main Customer Experience Center website.Spencer’s original report from that 2014 visit to Cincinnati.
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GE Additive In this episode we visit GE’s Additive Technology Center and hear the history of GE Additive’s formation. Our guests include Greg Morris, Josh Mook, Amber Andreaco, Christine Furstoss, Chris Schuppe, and Eric Gatlin.This episode of The Prepared’s podcast is brought to you by GE Additive.Listen and subscribe on&nbsp;iTunes,&nbsp;Overcast,&nbsp;Google Play&nbsp;and&nbsp;Stitcher!



































Image courtesy GE Additive













Notes:Photos from GE’s Pittsburgh CEC.GE Additive’s main Customer Experience Center website.Spencer’s original report from that 2014 visit to Cincinnati.
The global scrap market with Adam Minter We talk with Adam Minter, a columnist at Bloomberg and author of the fantastic book Junkyard Planet: Travels in the Billion-Dollar Trash Trade.This episode of The Prepared’s podcast is sponsored by Supplyframe and the 2019 Hackaday Prize. If you’ve got a hardware product - something truly groundbreaking or an improvement on something that already exists - then go to prize.supplyframe.com to enter and win up to $125,000!



































Adam demonstrates how not to ride a forklift.













Listen and subscribe on iTunes, Overcast, Google Play and Stitcher!Notes:Scrap MagazineThe Huron Valley Steel Corporation60 Minutes’ 2008 investigation into e-waste, and a Youtube copy of the video version.A short documentary on Panipat, the city in India where massive quantities of used textiles are reprocessed and recycled into “shoddy,” an inexpensive wool textile.Lastly, Adam was kind enough to share a short video he recorded in 2011 at an OmniSource facility in Fort Wayne, IN. What you’re seeing below is scrap being fed into a shredder by conveyor; the operator has a live, thermal imaging view to see what’s going on inside the machine:
Toyota City with Lucas Lappe A quick chat with Lucas Lappe about his tour of Toyota City. Lucas is design engineer at Doris Dev, and is currently traveling on the Magical Mystery Plant Tour.Listen and subscribe on&nbsp;iTunes,&nbsp;Overcast,&nbsp;Google Play&nbsp;and&nbsp;Stitcher!












































Notes:The Fondoodler, Lucas’s side project.@how_shits_made on InstagramA good piece on Toyota’s New Global Architecture project, and Toyota’s rather inscrutable website for the same.The Toyota Way and The Machine that Changed the World - both must-reads for any manufacturing nerd.
Zach Dunham, Centerline Labs // The Public Radio Another in our continuing series on the state of small-scale US consumer electronics manufacturing. Zach Dunham is co-founder of Centerline Labs LLC, and co-creator of The Public Radio.Listen and subscribe on&nbsp;iTunes,&nbsp;Overcast,&nbsp;Google Play&nbsp;and&nbsp;Stitcher!



































A late weekend worksession during The Public Radio’s first fulfillment drive, 2015













Notes:The many other episodes in which The Public Radio has featured prominently: One, two, and three with Zach, one with Gabe Ochoa, and one with Rony Kubat.Zach’s 2015 description of our v1.0 tuning process.Zach’s 2015 recap of The Public Radio’s first Kickstarter financials.Lots of writing about The Public Radio on Spencer’s blog.Note: Listeners of this podcast are friends of ours! Use offer code “THEPREPARED” for 20% off any order made through our website.Show transcriptSpencer Wright - 00:00 - Welcome back to The Prepared podcast. I am Spencer Wright. So I wanted to record a quick preface to this week's episode, which is a conversation between myself and my good friend and co founder Zach Dunham, about our project, The Public Radio. A long time listeners will know, uh, and, and also readers of the newsletter will be well aware. The Public Radio has kind of become a case study for me that I use to test different ideas about the way the world works and trends in manufacturing. Uh, but for those who haven't been following along on a high level, the Public Radio is an FM radio that is tuned to a single station at our factory and is housed in a mason jar. We initially launched on kickstarter in 2014. We sold about 2,500 units back then, which we shipped ourselves, um, myself and Zach and a bunch of our friends here in New York who we continue to owe a great debt to. Spencer Wright - 01:09 - And we shortly after we fulfilled the first 2,500 units. A couple of things happen in each of our personal lives. That meant the project was basically sidelined for two and a half years and when we relaunched in 2017, it was with the specific goal of figuring out how to make this thing into a small business, making it a piece of consumer electronics that was sustainable without either of us having to quit our job. Both of us do have full time employment elsewhere. Um, and so we need to engineer systems and processes that would allow at least some part of the business to run without our daily involvement. Spencer Wright - 02:00 - This episode is meant to be kind of an update to that question and process. Um, we recorded it a couple of months ago, which is about maybe 10 months after we offici
Kipp Bradford This week our guest is Kipp Bradford. Kipp is an an engineer, inventor, and oftentimes-educator. We talk about low volume/high value manufacturing, the tradeoffs of domestic & international trade, and manufacturing your products in-house.Listen and subscribe on iTunes, Overcast, Google Play and Stitcher!Notes:












































Kipp's personal & business websites.Kipp's patents on Google Patents.The Wikipedia page for Photolithography.AQS.A really simple explanation of how refrigerators work.Show transcriptSpencer Wright - 00:00 - Everything is actually kind of working, although this is only the second or third time I've recorded down here, so we'll see. We'll see. Kipp Bradford - 00:07 - Excellent. Happy to be the second Beta tester.Spencer Wright - 00:13 - This is The Prepared. Today, my guest is Kipp Bradford. Kipp is qualified in all kinds of ways that I can't even really put my mind around. Kipp Bradford - 00:34 - Not sure that I can either. Spencer Wright - 00:35 - Cool, Kipp. Well, welcome. Kipp Bradford - 00:38 - Thank you, Spencer. It's good to be here. Spencer Wright - 00:40 - Why don't we actually start with who are you? What do you do? Kipp Bradford - 00:46 - I call myself an engineer because academically, I have two degrees as a biomedical engineer, but I've spent a lot of time designing and building things. I like to be much more hands-on than the theoretical academic background that I have as a research science engineer. Despite my biomedical engineering background and interest in medical devices, I actually spent the first ten years of my career as a toy inventor. Five years into that career as a toy inventor, I had some overlap as an entrepreneur, so I started three businesses in that time period with some colleagues. One was a medical device, one was a golf club, one was a hearing aid. Those businesses all failed for various reasons. And various reasons are not that atypical, they usually come down to people more than they come down to money or ideas. By the time, you get venture capital investment, enough people have vetted your ideas and your market and your technology to know that there's a chance. But it's really hard to understand how your partners will behave when things go south or when things even get the slightest bit tough. Startups are really fragile. It's easy to break them. And that's what happened in these cases. Then after that string of startups and winding down the toy inventor career, I became faculty at Brown University and taught entrepreneurship and innovation and design and then launched a couple of more startups. Then was manufacturing some products under my own brand. Then got hired, I left Brown, had another startup, then got hired to a funky position. I interviewed for a job at MIT called Professor of Other at the Media Lab. I got hired and then promptly told, “well, here’s the funny thing. We’re
Danielle Applestone, Bantam Tools We talk with Danielle Applestone, CEO of Bantam Tools, about the state of desktop manufacturing, the gender gap in engineering, and doing business with DARPA.Listen and subscribe on iTunes, Overcast, Google Play and Stitcher!



































Danielle and a Bantam CNC, as seen in a recent profile in Make.













Notes:Daughters of Rosie, Danielle's recently launched organization to build women-only programs at local training facilities and retention plans for manufacturers that hire women.Four regional women-in-manufacturing organizations that Danielle recommends:The Southern Automotive Women's Forum.Tradeswomen, Inc.Oregon Tradeswomen.Chicago Women in Trades.A recent profile of Danielle & Bantam.Deloitte's report on the skills gap in US manufacturing.Saudi Arabia's Vision 2030 program.John Deere's Moline, Iowa headquarters.Eagle's new built-in Gerber file viewer.The Cricut CNC cutter.Show TranscriptSpencer Wright - 00:00 - So yeah, move that. Yeah, you're the master of the microphone. Danielle Applestone - 00:03 - Hello. I’m the master of the microphone. Spencer Wright - 00:10 - This is The Prepared. Spencer Wright - 00:23 - Today, my guest is Danielle Applestone. Danielle is CEO of Bantam Tools which makes desktop CNC milling machines for PCB and mechanical prototyping. Danielle, thanks for coming on the podcast. Danielle Applestone - 00:33 - Thanks for having me. This is great. Spencer Wright - 00:35 - So, I have a moderately hard-hitting prompt. I don't know, maybe not.Danielle Applestone - 00:35 - Great. Right out of the gate. Spencer Wright - 00:46 - I want to talk about the state of desktop manufacturing in general. Obviously, maybe, your market's a little bit distinct from the 3D printing market obviously, but it also is part of it in some ways and the desktop 3D printing market has gone through a crazy couple of years. How do you evaluate desktop manufacturing in general right now? And where do you see that going in your role now? D
Tara Pham, Numina We're back! For the second full episode of Season 2 we talk with Tara Pham, CEO of Numina. Numina makes vision & analytics systems that cities use to understand traffic, usage, and other aspects of urban space.Subscribe on iTunes, Overcast, Google Play and Stitcher!Notes:












































A 2015 blog post describing how Numina developed their early prototypes with a Knight Foundation Prototype Fund grant.Numina's #pointingatinfrastructure posts on Instagram, which capture the feeling I get from spending time with the team.The Official Guide to Tactical Urbanism.A good piece on how the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation reduced drive-alone rates by (among other things) forcing employees to pay a day rate for parking.Show transcriptSpencer Wright - 00:00 - Yes, so I have a sentence and then I have one question and then we can kind of see where it goes.Tara Pham - 00:05 - Okay. Cool.Spencer Wright - 00:06 - Cool. Okay. This is The Prepared. Today, my guest is Tara Pham. Tara is CEO of Numina, an NYC based company that makes sensor kits for traffic monitoring and analytics. Tara, thanks for coming on.Tara Pham - 00:34 - Thanks for having me.Spencer Wright - 00:36 - So if you'll humor me, I want to start a little bit philosophical. You guys recently moved to New York, which is, I think, by most metrics, the biggest and most urbanized city in the US at least?Tara Pham - 00:49 - Yes. By all metrics.Spencer Wright - 00:52 - Cool. Great. And Numina, I think of you guys working on problems that are, if not like specific to, at least most acute in urban areas. So I'm just curious—what do you find compelling about cities? And what are the challenges that you think are particularly acute to American cities over, say the next like 50 years or something like that? Sorry, it's a big question.Tara Pham - 01:22 - Wow. Big question to start. So what I think just personally interests me in cities—I grew up in a city. I'm glad I grew up in a city. My—Spencer Wright - 01:30 - Where'd you grow up?Tara Pham - 01:31 - I grew up in San Francisco. I think it's just, put simply, it's density, it's running into people and ideas and things that are different than you or even that are the same as you, but in ways you don't expect. You have enough people to have meaningful numbers and even really tiny tribes culturally in a city. And also just being outside. I mean this is a little different than New York, but in San Francisco, it's enjoyable to walk around all day.Spencer Wright - 02:03 - It is here too, just not all the year. Tara Pham - 02:04 - Yeah, most of the year it is there. I think also in San Francisco, one thing that's really unique is the terrain. You can kind of know where you are with very little context just because you always have a view of another part of the city or something like that because of the hills. Walk
Max Haot, Launcher Space We talk with Max Haot, CEO of Launcher Space. Max cofounded Livestream in 2007, and in 2017 founded Launcher. Launcher is developing rockets purpose-built for delivering small satellites into orbit.Subscribe on iTunes,&nbsp;Overcast,&nbsp;Google Play&nbsp;and Stitcher!












































Notes:Launcher's twitter and instagram feeds, which are a little more active than their website ;)A good explainer on the differences between pump- and pressure-fed liquid rockets.A 2017 piece on Blue Origin's BE-4 test failure.NASA describes the risk of space debris &amp; the Kessler Syndrome.The New York Times' 1920 article on Robert H. Goddard.A history of the ex-Grumman facility in Calverton, NY&nbsp;where Launcher now does their test flights. See also this 1994 article on Grumman's exit from Calverton.A new method to add propulsion to cubesats, which typically can't carry fuel due to increased risk of explosion: Water vapor jets.And of course, see this video of Launcher's pressure fed 500 lbf engine being tested:
Season 2 intro The Prepared's new recording setup, thanks to our donors on Patreon!













A quick intro to Season 2 of The Prepared's podcast! The first real episode of the season will drop in the next few days; in the meantime, get yourself subscribed via iTunes, Overcast, Google Play and Stitcher!
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