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Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission split in two The city of Portland’s Planning and Sustainability Commission is being split into two different boards — with one focused on sustainability, the other on planning and land use. The broad purpose of these boards is to help create policy and make recommendations to their specific city bureau. Willamette Week reporter Sophie Peel joins us to explain what led to this shake up and most importantly, why it matters.
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The new federal Inflation Reduction Act will have many impacts in Oregon President Biden is expected to sign the Inflation Reduction Act into law soon. Environmental advocates hail it as the first major environmental law since 1990, and the country’s most significant investment in the fight against climate change. Nora Apter, climate program director at the Oregon Environmental Council, tells us what it will mean for Oregon.
TriMet faces historic driver shortage Portland’s public transit agency, TriMet, is in need of more drivers. The agency is currently facing a historic low of people who can go behind the wheel. In fact, starting mid-September Portlanders will see the agency scale back services for 10 of its bus lines. JC Vannatta is the executive director of public affairs at TriMet. He joins us to share how this staffing issue is affecting the agency and their plans to bring in new applicants.
REBROADCAST: Pasta By Hand Portland chef Jenn Louis was named Best New Chef by "Food and Wine Magazine" and her work has appeared in "The Wall Street Journal," "Bon Appetit," "SHAPE" and "The New York Times." We listen back to our conversation with her from 2015 about her cookbook "Pasta By Hand." The book is a collection of recipes gathered from homes and restaurants throughout Italy, and is the only known work to have cataloged the country's wide variety of hand-shaped pasta and dumplings. Her Portland restaurant Lincoln has closed since this interview first aired.
Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission split in two The city of Portland’s Planning and Sustainability Commission is being split into two different boards — with one focused on sustainability, the other on planning and land use. The broad purpose of these boards is to help create policy and make recommendations to their specific city bureau. Willamette Week reporter Sophie Peel joins us to explain what led to this shake up and most importantly, why it matters.
Sex trafficking survivors call for changes, more support The Northwest Survivor Alliance was founded by survivors of sex trafficking. Members support each other and advocate for more services to help people deal with the trauma of their abuse. They say law enforcement and the criminal justice system has made some changes in the way they handle those who force children and adults into sex trafficking. But too often victims are still being charged with crimes related to being trafficked, they say, and far more is needed to help them recover and make sure they’re not trafficked again. We hear more from Northwest Survivor Alliance co-founder Jay Benke and one of its members, Robin Miller.
New research focuses on resilience of Oregon’s coastal roads and bridges Researchers at Oregon State University used computer modeling to assess the resilience of roads and bridges on the Oregon coast and how this critical infrastructure would fare in the event of a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. A recently published study focuses on local roads as well as transportation infrastructure like highways that connect communities to each other. The researchers looked at how different factors would impact recovery on the entire coast from Warrenton to Gold Beach. OSU Civil and Construction Engineering Professor Dan Cox was one of the co-authors of the study. He joins us to dig into the details.
Cities continue to pass homeless camping ordinances Three years ago, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that punishing people for sleeping on the street amounts to cruel and unusual punishment if they have no place else to go. That case, Martin v. Boise, and others have since helped to shape the way that cities and municipalities approach homelessness. We’ll hear from Seattle University School of Law Professor Sara Rankin about what the current legal framework is for cities addressing homelessness.
Why one downtown Portland business is moving to the Lloyd Center After 16 years in Old Town, Portland’s Floating World Comics is moving out of the neighborhood. Customers will now need to head to the Lloyd Center to see the comic store’s new location, which is already open. Jason Leivian is the owner of Floating World Comics. He is hopeful his move will inspire other small businesses to open shop in the mall and ultimately create a new community. Leivian joins us to share what prompted his move and what he’s hoping for the future of the Lloyd Center.
Using ‘green infrastructure’ to promote equity is a key goal for new Oregon forestry manager In June, the Oregon Department of Forestry hired Scott Altenhoff to lead its Urban and Community Forestry Assistance program. Previously, Altenhoff worked as an urban forester for the City of Eugene, where he became aware of temperature disparities due to differences in tree cover between economically disadvantaged and affluent neighborhoods. In 2014, he worked with community members to direct city crews to plant more trees in West Eugene and launched annual maintenance cycles for their upkeep. Today, Altenhoff has a new target: school campuses which he says are in dire need of “green infrastructure” to promote health, improve air quality and combat social inequity. Scott Altenhoff joins us to talk about his vision and the key threats facing urban forests, from climate change to invasive species.
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