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Unpublished Cafe

Unpublished Cafe, hosted by veteran radio journalist Ed Hand, provides an unfiltered prospective on Canadian current affairs free of bias and political partisanship.

Unpublished Cafe is the official podcast of Unpublished Media Inc.
Unpublished Cafe, hosted by veteran radio journalist Ed Hand, provides an unfiltered prospective on Canadian current affairs free of bias and political partisanship.

Unpublished Cafe is the official podcast of Unpublished Media Inc. << Show Less
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Liberal Budget 2022 This is the first budget after the Liberals and NDP announced their supply and confidence agreement, which would see them prop up the government until 2025. In terms of new spending, this budget comes with much less than previous as Covid support programs come to an end. Just over 31 billion over the next five years. This budget will also see the deficit drop to $52 billion, down half from last year. That windfall comes in the form of higher oil prices and revenues. While the country has more than made up for lost jobs that evaporated during the pandemic, some money minds are looking for growth. Our Unpublished dot vote question asks: Does the 2022 federal budget address your economic concerns? YesNoUnsureYou can log on and vote right now at Unpublished dot vote.Listen to the podcast, read the articles, cast your vote, email your MP to tell them why, and then take a moment to check out the new Unpublished.ca portal for politics and current affairs in Canada, as we roll it out one section at a time in the coming weeks. Guests: Warren Kinsella, Political commentator and former special advisor to PM Jean ChretienJim Stanford is an Economist and the Director of the Centre for Future WorkDan Kelly is the President of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business
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Liberal Budget 2022 This is the first budget after the Liberals and NDP announced their supply and confidence agreement, which would see them prop up the government until 2025. In terms of new spending, this budget comes with much less than previous as Covid support programs come to an end. Just over 31 billion over the next five years. This budget will also see the deficit drop to $52 billion, down half from last year. That windfall comes in the form of higher oil prices and revenues. While the country has more than made up for lost jobs that evaporated during the pandemic, some money minds are looking for growth. Our Unpublished dot vote question asks: Does the 2022 federal budget address your economic concerns? YesNoUnsureYou can log on and vote right now at Unpublished dot vote.Listen to the podcast, read the articles, cast your vote, email your MP to tell them why, and then take a moment to check out the new Unpublished.ca portal for politics and current affairs in Canada, as we roll it out one section at a time in the coming weeks. Guests: Warren Kinsella, Political commentator and former special advisor to PM Jean ChretienJim Stanford is an Economist and the Director of the Centre for Future WorkDan Kelly is the President of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business
Liberal-NDP Cooperation Pact The whispers circling around Parliament Hill became louder this week as the federal Liberals and NDP announced a “supply and confidence agreement”, which could keep the Liberals in power until 2025. Will it last that long? The talks were off and on since January and really ramped up during the Ottawa occupation by the so called trucker convoy. The deal means the NDP will support the Liberals on a number of policies they mutually agree upon. Think dental care and pharmacare. It will also see the NDP support the Liberals on confidence votes like budgets. It could spare Canadians a trip to the ballot box for three years. Our Unpublished dot vote question asks:Will the supply and confidence agreement between the two last until 2025? Yes, No or Unsure. You can log on and vote right now at Unpublished dot vote and have your voice heard. GuestsLydia Miljan, Professor of Political Science at the University of Windsor.Karl Nerenberg of Rabble who covers the Hill. Karl Bélanger, President of Traxxion Strategies
The Russian—Ukrainian War More than 10 million Ukrainians or 1/4 of the population, have fled their homeland nearly a month after Russia began shelling its neighbor. It has created a humanitarian crisis. While not referred to as a war in Russia but rather a “special military operation”, the aim is to remove the current Ukrainian government. While most of the West has levelled punishing economic sanctions on Russia, others have stood by Russia’s aggression. Ukraine has made no qualms about joining NATO which Russia sees as provocation, despite Ukraine being a sovereign nation. NATO members have rejected a no-fly zone over Ukraine for fear of being dragged further into the fray. Our Unpublished Vote question this week asks: Should NATO put boots on the ground to defend Ukraine? Our audience voted: Yes = 59%No = 35%Unsure = 6%However you’re watching and listening to our show, whether through our social media channels on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, or on our podcast channels—iTunes, GooglePlay, Spotify, iHeartRadio and more—We would like to remind you that you can cast-your-vote on this topic at Unpublished.vote, and then email your MP to tell them why.Joining us to discuss the Russian invasion of Ukraine and Canada’s role to play…Guests: Elliot Tepper, Senior Fellow, Norman Paterson School of International Affairs; Peggy Mason, President, Rideau Institute; Gilles Breton, Former Canadian diplomat in Russia; and Gar Pardy, Former Canadian Ambassador
Russia's invasion of Ukraine In the early morning of February 24th the world woke up to an invasion of Ukraine by Russia. Almost 200,000 Russian forces had been congregated along the Russian—Ukrainian border under the claim of “military training”. For some, it was a signal that an invasion was imminent. Where will it lead the world? All apologies to those who thought the Cold War was over, but here we are. While Russia has the numbers and firepower, the Russian army is being held back by Ukraine. And, while Vladimir Putin watches from the Kremlin, Ukraine President Voldimir Zelensky has taken up arms with his forces, while still communicating with world leaders. The scenes of destruction are devastating for those on the outside. NATO members have been offering assistance in the form of equipment but will not enforce a No-Fly Zone out of fear of escalating the conflict. Our Unpublished Vote question asks: Should NATO put boots on the ground to defend Ukraine? Yes, No or Unsure. You can log on and vote right now at Unpublished.vote and have your voice heard. Guests: Colin Robertson, former Canadian diplomat/Vice President at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute; Elliot Tepper, Senior Fellow Norman Paterson School of International Affairs Jane Boulden, Professor, Department of Political Science, Royal former Canadian diplomat /Vice President at the Canadian Global Affairs Institute @CAGlobalAffairs @DonaldColinRob1Military College
Extremism in Canada: Is it on the rise? Canadians like to think we’re more tolerant, nicer, more welcoming than our American neighbours. The images of racial conflict in the US are prevalent, but when something like that occurs north of the 49th parallel, we’re shocked. Should we be? The freedom convoy is out of downtown Ottawa but the 3-week occupation is something the residents won’t soon forget. As the collection of truckers made their way across the country, there were rumblings that other groups were using the movement for their own gain. The Confederate and Nazi flags that were seen on the first weekend solidified that view for many. Extremism in Canada has increased 320% over the last 5-years according to the Institute for Strategic Dialogue. Our Unpublished Vote question this week asks: Do you feel “extremism” is on the rise in Canada? Our audience responded: Yes      = 41.6%No        = 56.4%Unsure = 2.5% However you’re watching and listening to our show, whether through our social media channels on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, or on our podcast channels—iTunes, GooglePlay, Spotify, iHeartRadio and more—We would like to remind you that you can “cast your vote” on this topic at Unpublished.vote, and then email your MP to tell them why. Guests: Barbara Perry, Professor Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, Ontario Tech University @CHBEOntarioTechAmarnath Amarasingam, Assistant Prof. School of Religion, Queen’s University; Senior Fellow with the International Centre for the Study of Radicalization; Senior Fellow with the Institute for Strategic Dialogue @AmarAmarasingamAndrew Crosby, PhD Candidate, Sociology at Carleton University
Extremism in Canada The 3-week occupation of downtown Ottawa has dissipated. What began as a ‘trucker convoy’ against vaccine mandates was co-opted by some extremists, such as the ones waving the Nazi and Confederate flags. They were dubbed “a few bad apples” among a peaceful protest, which was anything but peaceful. It also shone a light on a troubling aspect of Canada—that extremism is alive and well here. What will it take to stop it? The world got a glimpse inside the power of extremism during the January 6th insurrection at the US Capitol. For the residents of downtown Ottawa, the occupation of their neighborhoods felt eerily similar. Canadians, at least on the world stage, like to promote our tolerance for everyone, but that is an illusion. Hate grows here too. Our Unpublished Vote question asks: Do you feel “extremism” is on the rise in Canada? YesNoUnsure Unpublished.caListen to the podcast, read the articles, cast your vote, email your MP to tell them why, and then take a moment to check out the new Unpublished.ca portal for politics and current affairs in Canada, as we roll it out one section at a time in the coming weeks. Podcast Guests: Barbara Perry, Professor Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, Ontario Tech University; Stephanie Carvin, Associate Professor of International Relations at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs
Can the Conservative Party unite after the Freedom Convoy? Call it what you will...’The Karen Convoy’, ‘The Freedom Convoy’ or ‘FluTruxClan’, the two week occupation of downtown Ottawa has claimed one political life, that of Conservative Leader, Erin O’Toole, who was ousted as leader of the party when two thirds of his caucus voted to go in another direction. It will spawn a leadership race for the Tories. Can a new leader stop the party from shooting itself in the foot or unite all the views in the Big Blue Tent? The so called ‘Freedom Convoy’ has turned downtown Ottawa on its head. It has also ignited similar protests at border crossings in Alberta, Manitoba and Canada’s busiest crossing to the US, the Ambassador Bridge in Windsor. And in just a few days, the interim Conservative Leader, Candice Bergen has flip flopped from supporting the convoy to now telling them to go home. If you were a Conservative supporter, you might wonder what they’ll say tomorrow. The Conservatives were disappointed in their performance in the last election and mumbling about new leadership has been around since late September. Which direction will the party sail now? Our Unpublished dot vote question asks:Can the Conservative Party of Canada be united? Yes No Unsure You can log on and vote right now at http://Unpublished.ca and have your voice heard. Guests: Scott Gilmore, Maclean’s columnist and self-described, self-loathing Tory Frank Graves, Ekos Research Lori Turnbull, Dalhousie University Warren Kinsella, Political commentator and Former advisor to PM Chretien
Canada and the Russian—Ukrainian Crisis Diplomatic efforts are doubling up to avoid war between Ukraine and Russia. Will it be enough? Since November, 100,000+ Russian troops have been stationed along the Ukraine-Russia border for what Russia calls military exercises. Ukrainians are growing more nervous about the prospect of war. Since the 2014 annexation of Crimea, Ukrainians have been dealing with violent insurgencies that have left thousands dead and their homes in tatters. French President Emmanuel Macron is meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin to try and reach an agreement. The US has been warning of a possible invasion since late last year. Canada is keeping close tabs on the situation as the largest Ukrainian diaspora outside of Ukraine and Russia reside here: 1.2 million. This country has sent funding and non-military equipment along with troops for training Ukrainian military. It has not sent lethal military weapons. Macron refers to today’s meeting as “dialogue and de-escalation”. This is a pivotal moment in the standoff. Guests:Dr. Alexander Lanoszka, Assistant Professor, Political Science Balsillie School of International Affairs, University of Waterloo;Gilles Breton, Former Canadian diplomat to RussiaAndrew Rasiulis, Canadian Global Affairs InstitutePeggy Mason, President of the Rideau Institute
Canada and the Russian-Ukrainian Conflict Canada is home to the largest Ukrainian population outside of the Ukraine and Russia. Over 1.3 million make Canada their home here and they are looking for more from the federal government when it comes to their homeland. Modern day Ukraine came into existence with the collapse of the U.S.S.R, after which it became an independent nation. But, it also has an old nemesis leering across the border. Russia has been building up troops and equipment along its border with Ukraine in what it’s calling military exercises. From the Ukrainian side, they view it as intimidation leading to a possible invasion. Canada has sent military aid in the form of funding, more soldiers to train Ukrainian military and non-lethal equipment such as night vision goggles and Kevlar vests. At this point, the federal government is backing off on lethal equipment. Should Canada revisit that decision? Russia does not like the western influence in Ukraine and in particular it’s desire to join NATO. Russia sees that as encroaching on its sphere of influence. At the same time, the West is watching as more than 100,000 Russian troops amass on Ukraine’s border. US President Joe Biden has been working the phones with allies to put together a response which would likely include sanctions. Russian leader Vladimir Putin has seen his approval dip considerably in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. In the past, when his approval plummeted, he found refuge by invading Georgia in 2008 and later, the Crimea during the Winter Olympics in Sochi.  Some international analysts see this as a way for Putin to shore up his support. Our Unpublished Vote question asks: Should Canada send military weapons to the Ukraine to defend itself? Yes NoUnsure Log and vote right now at Unpublished.ca and have your voice heard. Guests: Gilles Breton, Former Canadian Diplomat to RussiaMarcus Kolga, Founder of Disinfowatch and Senior Fellow at the Macdonald Laurier Institute
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